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  • Is the global economy slowing down? The World Bank

  • thinks we're heading for recession.

  • This is News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • I'm Neil. And I'm Beth.

  • Make sure you watch to the end to learn vocabulary to talk about this story.

  • And don't forget to subscribe to our channel, like this video

  • and try the quiz on our website.

  • Now, the story.

  • As prices continue to rise,

  • the global economy is getting closer to a recession.

  • That's according to a prediction by the World Bank.

  • This year, the economy is expected to rise by the smallest percentage

  • since 1991. Reasons for slow growth

  • include Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the impact of the pandemic.

  • You've been looking at the headlines,

  • Beth, what's the vocabulary?

  • We have 'overcoming', 'doom and gloom' and 'turbulent'.

  • This is News Review from BBC Learning English.

  • Let's take a look at our first headline.

  • This is from the Daily Star in Bangladesh.

  • Overcoming looming economic challenges

  • in 2023.

  • OK. Let's start with a definition of 'recession',

  • because that's what this story is about. 'A recession' is a period

  • of two or more quarters

  • that's three-month periodswhen the economy shrinks.

  • Now, in this headline, it's saying that hard economic times are coming.

  • But the word

  • we're looking at is 'overcoming' and it's made up of two parts, 'over' and 'coming'.

  • I know both of those parts,

  • but when we put them together,

  • what's the sense?

  • Well, 'overcome' means you successfully deal with a problem, and a problem

  • that is quite difficult to cope with. So, in this case, 'economic challenges'.

  • OK. So, 'overcoming' is similar to 'defeat' or 'control'.

  • Yeah, that's right. So, if you are very shy,

  • you might overcome your shynessyou gain control of it

  • and become more confident.

  • Yeah, or you might be playing sport,

  • let's say football,

  • and if you 'overcome' the opposition,

  • it means you beat them. But it's not just beating. With 'overcome',

  • there is a sense of real struggle

  • it wasn't easy to win.

  • Yeah, that's right. And we also use this in the passive,

  • but it has a slightly different meaning, doesn't it?

  • Yes. If you are overcome by emotion,

  • it means you have a very strong reactionyou feel it very strongly.

  • You might have a physical reaction.

  • You might shake with fear or cry.

  • Yeah. And it's not only used with negative emotions,

  • it's used with positive ones as well,

  • like joy or excitement.

  • OK, let's look at that again.

  • Let's take a look at our next headline.

  • This is from Business Live.

  • It's far from being all doom

  • and gloom on the economy.

  • So, the headline is saying that, actually,

  • it's not as bad as you think. It's not all doom and gloom.

  • Now, 'doom and gloom' is the expression we're looking at.

  • I like this expression

  • it's got two words and they both rhyme.

  • But, what do they mean?

  • Well, it's a general bad feeling

  • really. So, 'doom' actually means

  • death and destruction. 'gloom' is to do with darkness

  • imagine a miserable, grey, rainy day

  • so it's really quite a negative thing. But in this headline it's saying

  • that the opposite is true. It's saying that

  • it's not all 'doom and gloom'.

  • Yes. And we use the expression in this way

  • quite often to say that something, isn't as bad as you think. So,

  • for exampleat the moment, Beth,

  • I'm actually not feeling very well.

  • It's freezing cold outside, my train was late again...

  • But the sun is shining, so it's not all doom and gloom.

  • Now, a word about this expression

  • we don't say 'I'm doom and gloom'.

  • We use it to comment on how bad

  • a situation is.

  • That's right. So we can list

  • a number of things that are bad or wrong

  • and then comment on that by saying 'it's all doom and gloom' or 'it's a bit,

  • it's a bit doom and gloom, isn't it?'

  • Let's have a look at that again.

  • Time for our next headline.

  • This is from the New Straits Times. Global recession imminent

  • after turbulent 2022.

  • OK, so a recession is 'imminent' –

  • it means it's just about to start. The word

  • we're looking at, though, is 'turbulent'.

  • Now, this word, Beth,

  • reminds me of a situation

  • you can experience on a plane.

  • Yeah. You're probably thinking about 'turbulence' – that's a noun.

  • So, if you're on a plane and the pilot says'

  • 'put your seatbelt on', the plane is going to get a bit unsteady,

  • things might start falling down.

  • This is 'turbulence'. Yes, that is 'turbulence' –

  • I really don't like turbulence.

  • The word we're looking at though, is 'turbulent', which is the adjective.

  • Tell us more. So 'turbulent' describes

  • something that isn't calm,

  • it might be unstable.

  • Now, we often use this in relation to the state

  • or maybe the history of a country or a place.

  • So, if we are describing that country as 'turbulent',

  • they might have experienced some conflict, maybe some violence.

  • And so the headline describes 2022 as 'turbulent'.

  • Last year was very turbulentwe had the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

  • We had various environmental disasters.

  • We had famine.

  • We had lots of protests around the world.

  • Yeah, you're right. There were lots of issues

  • that made it an unstable or a turbulent year.

  • Let's look at that again.

  • We've had 'overcoming' – dealing

  • with a difficult problem. 'doom and gloom' –

  • we use this to describe a generally bad situation.

  • And 'turbulent' – not calm; unstable.

  • Don't forget, there's a quiz on our website

  • at BBCLearningEnglish.com.

  • Thank you for joining us

  • and goodbye. Bye.

Is the global economy slowing down? The World Bank

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Global economy slows down: BBC News Review

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    KERRY 發佈於 2023 年 01 月 18 日
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