Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Have you ever thought it’s a good idea to take a nap in the middle of the street? Or,

  • maybe, you cleaned your entire school when you were a teenager? If not, then youre

  • probably not Japanese. Here’s a little something for you from the Land of the Rising Sun — I

  • think we could all learn a thing or two from them!

  • On average, the Japanese live 4 years longer than Americans. Their life expectancy is the

  • second longest in the world at 85 years, beat only by Monaco with 89 years. (But they have

  • more yachts per capita.) By other accounts, though, San Marino also has a higher life

  • expectancy. On the topic of age, by the way, Japan has

  • many more elderly people than children. In fact, 21% of Japanese people are over the

  • age of 65 — this is the largest proportion in the world.

  • This might be since the quality of life, especially when it concerns the crime rate, is way better

  • in Japan than in most countries. For example, as per 2018 statistics, there are just 3 robberies

  • per 100,000 people in Tokyo. A paradise for law-abiding citizens!

  • The situation with work, especially office jobs, is a wholenother issue. Japan has

  • a 40-hour work week, but most employees voluntarily work overtime, generally extending it to 60

  • hours. This is a habit taken from the mid-20th century, when the government encouraged people

  • to work long hours to restore the country’s economy after the war.

  • That’s why it’s become normal to take naps right in the workplace or even in the

  • streets. Strolling around Tokyo in the evening, youll notice people dressed in neat suits

  • just sleeping on the ground like it’s their own cozy bed. There’s even a word for it

  • in Japanese: inemuri. Falling asleep on the job shows that youre working hard, so some

  • people even fake it to get appreciation! Wow, getting a pay raise for napping in your office

  • chairSounds like fun to me! Zzzzzzz. Still, companies and the government alike

  • are doing their best to make people go home earlier. One IT company, for example, makes

  • its employees wear purplecapes of shameon the last Wednesday of a month if they work

  • too many hours. I wonder how hardworking these people are, then?

  • Well, theyre like that for a reason, after all. All students are required to tidy up

  • in their school during the day. The tradition is called o-soji, and it includes mopping

  • floors and cleaning bathrooms. It teaches the students to help and respect other people,

  • and they sure take it seriously! High social standards have a downside, though.

  • There are currently over half a million people in Japan called hikikomorithese are young

  • adults who seclude themselves at home and won’t go out no matter what. The government

  • links this phenomenon to the psychological and social pressure, and frankly, I couldn’t

  • agree more. Anyway, rigorous practice in education makes

  • the Japanese successful in life most of the time. The literacy is close to 100%, which

  • is the highest in the world, and the unemployment rate is only about 4%, which is, as you may

  • guess, pretty low compared to most countries. But don’t think the Japanese don’t know

  • how to have fun! There are numerous festivals taking place all over Japan, and oh how strange

  • they are to us westerners. For example, Hadaka Matsuri, ornaked festival,” is where

  • thousands of men and boys take off their clothes and fight for a sacred object to gain luck

  • for the year. Well, okay. Whatever makes you happy, guysHakuna Matata. (oops sorry,

  • that’s not Japanese, that’s Disney…) About happiness, there arecuddle cafes

  • in the Land of the Rising Sun, which are made specifically for lonely and miserable people.

  • There, you can pay to lay next to a person and share a moment of peace and understanding.

  • For an additional fee, you can also stare at each other for a minute or stroke their

  • hair. Hmm. I don’t know if that’s sweet or creepy.

  • One of the reasons for loneliness might be that the Japanese are socially required to

  • hang out with their colleagues after work. So you don’t just meet up with friends and

  • forget about work after leaving the office; you go to a bar and drink with your coworkers,

  • and sometimes even your boss. Now that’s a frightening perspective for some.

  • Japan is a traditionalist society, so men are commonly breadwinners and seen as heirs

  • to their families. That’s why an unusual thing has happened: there are more adults

  • adopted there than children. Most often the adopted are men aged 20 to 30 years; this

  • is done to have an heir or, for instance, to pass down a business.

  • Remember I told you about their diligence? Well, it concerns every sphere of life, including

  • public transport. Japanese trains are almost never late, and if they are, they must issue

  • official delay certificates for passengers. This way, they have proof they weren’t late

  • because of their own tardiness. Politeness is one of Japan’s trademarks

  • known all over the world. There are numerous formalities to be observed in communication

  • with different people, and theyre all rather strict. They also have about 20 ways to say

  • sorry.” Now let that sink in. What is considered polite in Japan may sometimes

  • surprise foreigners, though. For example, slurping your noodles with gusto is a way

  • to show your appreciation to the cook. So don’t restrain yourself, slurp! Ahhh!

  • Avoid walking down the street with your food, however. It’s not exactly rude today, but

  • still not very classy. Don’t be surprised when you see the Japanese standing right at

  • the spot where they bought some treat, and eating itthey just don’t want to walk

  • with it. It’s also considered impolite to talk on

  • your phone in a confined public space, such as public transport. Great idea. Shall I repeat

  • that one? There, youre expected to put your phone in your bag or pocket, turn off

  • the sound, and only answer it if it’s urgent. And even then, you should keep your voice

  • down. You don’t want dirty looks from the locals, do you?

  • Youll probably find it next to impossible to talk on the phone on a subway train in

  • Japan anyway. This is especially true for Tokyo, where there are special people called

  • pusherson many stations. They do exactly what their name implies: pushing people into

  • the train cars. Try pulling out your phone when youre pinned to the wall!

  • Back to work issues: if you ever find yourself in a Japanese restaurant, don’t even think

  • about tipping your waiter. It’s considered rude, and the reason is simple: they do their

  • job, and they do it well because it’s an honor. If you give them a tip, you offend

  • them by assuming they do it for extra cash. You sporting tattoos? Then Japanese public

  • baths are off limits for you, sorry. Tattoos are considered ugly and associated with yakuza

  • (or organized Japanese criminal gangs), so no one will allow you entry to a public bath

  • without them at least covered. Recently, though, this has changed in many baths because Japan

  • is trying to be more open to tourists. Slippers are a real thing in all Japanese

  • homes and in many establishments. When entering someone’s home, youll be offered a pair,

  • so make sure you always take your shoes off. If no slippers are offered, you should still

  • leave your shoes outside. Cleanliness is a virtue, you know. Make sure you wear sox without

  • any holes.

  • So, what other curious things do you know about Japan? Sound off in the comments below!

  • If you learned something new today, then give this video a like, share it with a friend,

  • and here are some more cool videos to check out from the Bright Side of life!

Have you ever thought it’s a good idea to take a nap in the middle of the street? Or,

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級 美國腔

22 Strange Japanese Habits That Confuse Foreigners(22 Strange Japanese Habits That Confuse Foreigners)

  • 10 0
    Julianne Sung 發佈於 2021 年 10 月 13 日
影片單字