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  • Hi, I'm Vanessa from SpeakEnglishWithVanessa.com.

  • What are your hobbies?

  • Let's talk about it.

  • What are you going to do this weekend?

  • Are you going to stay on the couch relaxing or are you going to have a lot of friends

  • and family over to your house for a big dinner?

  • Everyone has different activities that they like to do in their free-time, and these activities

  • are a common topic in daily conversation.

  • So, today I'm going to help you learn how to talk about your hobbies in English.

  • I have something that I need to get off my chest.

  • This means I have something important that has been weighing me down that I need to share

  • with you.

  • And that's this.

  • In daily natural English conversations, we never use the word hobbies.

  • What?

  • We never say, "What are your hobbies?"

  • "I have a lot of hobbies."

  • Nope.

  • Unfortunately, this is a common word that's used in English textbooks, but in real conversation,

  • we never use the word hobbies.

  • You might occasionally see this in news programs or some kind of situation like this, but in

  • daily conversation, we don't use hobbies.

  • In today's lesson, I'm going to use the word hobby as you can see up here in the title

  • because it's like a news article presenting about hobbies.

  • But don't worry, I'm also going to share with you some natural ways that you can discuss

  • hobbies without actually using that word, but we'll get to that in a moment.

  • First, let's talk about how to describe your hobbies in English.

  • There are four common sentences that we use when we're talking about our hobbies and they're

  • pretty simple.

  • They are, I like to, I love to, when I have time, I usually, I wish I had more time to.

  • They seem pretty simple, right?

  • Well, I would like to present to you 20 common hobbies.

  • We're going to be practicing these sentences.

  • You're welcome to say these sentences out loud with me or after you watch the video,

  • you can go back and say them out loud with me to exercise your pronunciation muscles

  • and it's a great way to remember them by speaking out loud as well.

  • All right, let's practice these sentences.

  • I like to meet up with my friends.

  • I love to have a good meal with my family.

  • When I have time, I usually have friends over.

  • I wish I had more time to just chill on the couch.

  • I like to watch TV.

  • I love to go to the movie theater.

  • When I have time, I usually surf on the internet.

  • I wish I had more time to play video games.

  • I like to play the piano.

  • I like to play the guitar.

  • I like to play the drums.

  • Whatever instrument you like to play.

  • I love to listen to music.

  • When I have time, I usually sing, I usually dance.

  • I wish I had more time to go to concerts.

  • I like to learn English.

  • I love to travel.

  • When I have time, I usually take pictures of nature, of my friends, of my kids.

  • I wish I had more time to read books about self-improvement.

  • I wish I had more time to read something.

  • I like to work in the garden.

  • Or just use garden as a verb, I like to garden.

  • I love to go for a hike.

  • I love to go for a walk.

  • You can say, "I love to hike."

  • "I love to walk," but it's a little bit more natural in conversation to say, "I love to

  • go for a hike."

  • "I love to go for a walk."

  • When I have time, I usually play with my dog.

  • When I have time, I usually play with my kids or I wish I had more time to play soccer.

  • I wish I had more time to play tennis.

  • We can also use the word do for some activities.

  • I wish I had more time to do yoga.

  • I wish I had more time to do aerobics.

  • The difference between play and do has a lot of different rules.

  • That's another video for another time, but you can use this to talk about your hobbies.

  • Now that you know how to talk about free time activities, let's go back to the problem of

  • the word hobby.

  • How can you ask someone about their hobby if you can't use the word hobby?

  • Well, I'd like to tell you four common questions that we use to bring up the topic of free

  • time activities.

  • Question number one, "What did you do this weekend?"

  • This is not a specific question.

  • This is not directly asking, "What activities do you like to do?"

  • This is indirect, but when I say, "I went to an outdoor skating rink because it was

  • freezing outside and it was a lot of fun."

  • You learned something about me.

  • You learned about an activity that I like, skating.

  • Ooh, you've taken that information now.

  • This shows that we often ask about hobbies or about free time activities in an indirect

  • way.

  • Let's take a look at the next question.

  • When someone asks you, "What did you do this weekend?"

  • Or, "What did you do yesterday?"

  • You might say, "I went for a hike.

  • Have you ever been to Craggy Gardens?"

  • This is a common popular hiking destination in my city, Craggy Gardens.

  • When you ask, "Have you ever?"

  • Related to something that you've done, you're trying to find something in common, and this

  • is a really popular way to ask someone if you share the same hobbies without using the

  • word hobbies.

  • So you might ask, "Have you ever read science fiction?"

  • If you mention, "Oh yeah, I just read a great book, this science fiction book."

  • You might ask someone, "Oh, have you ever read science fiction?"

  • If they say, "No."

  • Okay, you know you don't share a hobby, but they might say, "Yeah, I read this once,"

  • and you can talk about it.

  • Or you might say, "This weekend I went to the movie theater and I saw Toy Story 4.

  • Have you ever seen Toy Story 4?"

  • Or, "Have you seen Toy Story 4?"

  • You're trying to find a connection with them and it's an indirect way to ask about their

  • hobbies, but you're trying to find something in common.

  • The third question is, "What kind of things do you like to do?"

  • You're not asking what kind of hobbies do you like to do?

  • We're using the general word things, which is certainly less exciting than the word hobby,

  • but it's more natural and that's what I want to help you speak is natural English.

  • This question is more direct.

  • What kind of things do you like to do?

  • It feels like it's better to use this question in a more structured situation.

  • So, if you're on a date and you want to get to know someone else, the other person, you

  • could use this kind of structured question as you're getting to know them, but if you're

  • in the office and your boss introduces you to your new coworker and you're just having

  • some small talk, you probably wouldn't use this direct question because it feels a little

  • bit like an interview maybe, but when you're on a date that's fine, right?

  • You want to get to know more information about the other person directly.

  • So, you can use this in more structured situations.

  • When you're having that conversation with a coworker, a new coworker you've never met,

  • you can use those first two questions.

  • On the other hand, you can use this more direct question with a really casual tone so that

  • it doesn't feel like an interview.

  • For example, recently my husband and I went on a hike with a friend who we don't know

  • very well, we just talked with him a couple of times.

  • But we went on a hike together and as we were driving to that hike I said, "What other things

  • do you like to do besides hiking?"

  • I know that he already likes hiking because we're going hiking together, but I want to

  • know what other activities, what other hobbies does he have?

  • So, I'm just asking this in a really casual way just to dig deeper and get to know more

  • about him without it being like an interview.

  • "Oh, what other kinds of things do you like to do besides hiking?"

  • Very casual if you ask it with that casual tone.

  • The fourth question is also for structured situations and that is, "What do you like

  • to do in your free time?"

  • This is similar in that it's better for maybe a date when you're really trying to get to

  • know someone else or maybe for an interview in a structured situation because it is direct

  • to usually in daily conversation, we're not so direct about getting to know someone else

  • in this interview type of way.

  • Instead, we'll ask more indirectly like, "What did you do this weekend?"

  • Or, "I like to do this.

  • Have you ever done this?"

  • Those first two questions are going to be much more indirect for daily conversation,

  • but the second two questions can be used in structured situations, which we all do encounter

  • in life.

  • They're just in different places.

  • Let's go to the final and possibly the most important section, how to ask follow up questions.

  • When someone shares a free time activity with you and they say, "Yeah, when I have time,

  • I like to garden."

  • Oh, great.

  • This is your chance.

  • Don't lose it.

  • You have received a key piece of information.

  • This is your mission impossible, except it's not impossible because you've watched this

  • lesson.

  • You've received the information that this person likes to garden.

  • All right, it's time to dig deeper.

  • Dig deeper in the garden, yes, but dig deeper and get to know more about this interest that

  • they have.