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  • Hey folks, welcome back to the channel! At the  end of my last high speed rail explained video  

  • covering Italy, I gave my viewers the choice of  which high speed rail explained would be next  

  • from a list of three small high speed rail  systems, with the votes tabulated

  • Taiwan High Speed Rail won, and I couldn't be more  excited to cover this excellent system. I'll  

  • do more votes at the end of HSR Explained  videos so make sure to stay tuned for them!

  • In the future as the number of large  high speed rail systems I haven't  

  • covered continues to decline I'll be covering  more and more small high speed rail systems,  

  • which are far from boring as THSR will  illustrate! THSR consists of only one  

  • line along the West Coast of Taiwan, but  it's very interesting so let's get into it!

  • If you're not already, consider supporting the  channel on Patreon to help me bring you more  

  • content like this high speed real explainedget direct access to exclusive transit chats,  

  • and for behind the scenes content, you also  get a station on the channel Metro Map! You  

  • should also consider following me on Twitter  and Instagram for all the latest updates.

  • Taiwan is very interesting: with an incredibly  high human development index and GDP per capita,  

  • it's at the center of the technology  revolution the world has seen in recent  

  • decades, with the world's largest contract  semiconductor manufacturing company TSMC,  

  • a number of major technology  manufacturers like Pegatron,  

  • Wistron, Foxconn and Quanta, as well as well  known technology brands like MSI and Asus.

  • Much like Japan, Taiwan is very dense and hastraditional rail network composed of narrow gauge.

  • Of course with the high degree of development, the  dense urban landscapes, and the massive economic  

  • development it was only a matter of time before  Taiwan developed its own high speed rail system.

  • Serious discussion of a high speed rail  line for Taiwan started in the 1980's but,  

  • it was not until 1996 that  tendering for the project began.

  • As it turns out bidding for the project was  tumultuous with a build operate transfer  

  • model being used, with rolling stock bids  from a consortium of Alstom and Siemens,  

  • and a Japanese consortium battling it out.

  • A build operate transfer procurement is whereconsortium builds and operates a project for a  

  • set period of time, before transferring it back to  the government who will develop its own contracts.  

  • The Alstom-Siemens consortium known as Eurotrain  was initially selected to provide rolling stock,  

  • proposing a hybrid train with ICE  locomotives and TGV Duplex passenger cars.

  • Unfortunately for Eurotrain, a changing landscape  in the high speed rail world led to a swap to the  

  • Japanese rolling stock option. This led tolegal battle which ultimately left Taiwan's  

  • high speed rail service with Japanese rolling  stock, and with damages being paid to Eurotrain.

  • Interestingly, to some degree the consortium was  created to reduce competition between European  

  • companies for the bid, as had happened in the  earlier competition for contracts for KTX,  

  • Korea's High Speed Train System.

  • In 2000 construction began on the projectand the better part of a decade later in 2007  

  • operations began between Taipei and  Kaohsiung with a total of 8 stations.

  • Taipei Main Station which allows for connections  to the Taipei MRT Red and Blue Lines as well as  

  • TRA services (Taiwan's JR esque National Railway  operator) and the Taoyuan Airport MRT Line.

  • Banqiao Station which allows  for connections to the Taipei  

  • MRT Blue and Yellow Lines and TRA Services.

  • Taoyuan Station which allows for  connections to the Taoyuan Airport MRT Line.

  • Hsinchu Station, which allows  for connection to TRA Services.

  • Taichung Station which allows  for connection to the brand new  

  • Taichung Metro and it's Green  Line as well as TRA Services.

  • Chiayi Station which doesn't  provide rail transfers.

  • Tainan Station which provides  transfers to TRA services.

  • And Zuoying which provides connections to the  Kaohsiung Metro Red Line and TRA Services.

  • Furthermore, in 2015 3 new infill stations  opened at Miaoli, Changhua, and Yunlin  

  • and a year later another new station opened  with an extension to Nangang Station to the  

  • East. Unfortunately though, the new stations  are also the least used on the system.

  • Miaoli provides connections to TRA services while  

  • Nangang provides connections to the  Taipei MRT Blue Line and TRA services.

  • Of course, the system is set to expand along  with Taiwan's incredible economic success in  

  • recent years, extensions are planned to  both Pingtung, East of Kaohsiung, and to  

  • Yilan Southeast of Taipei. While the extension  to Pingtung should be fairly simple, crossing  

  • the mountainous terrain to Yilan, a city-region  of only half a million, will be very complex.

  • Of course, the most notable notable part  of the Taiwan High Speed Rail project  

  • is that it is the most substantial export  of Shinkansen technology outside of Japan  

  • (if you haven't seen my video on high speed rail  in Japan I recommend you pause the video and go  

  • check it out), with the 700T rolling stock used  being a variant of the 700 series Shinkansen,  

  • not the most unique naming scheme I knowbut I might have misspoken when I said  

  • the 500 series Shinkansen was my favorite  design, because the 700T is very attractive,  

  • it looks quite unique because the front does not  have the distinctive long Shinkansen nose and the  

  • reason why is a whole other discussion, also  worth noting the 700T operates in 12 car sets,

  • unlike the 16-car sets most often used for the 700 series.

  • Something else worth noting is that the system has  four underground stations all on the northern end  

  • of the line, something which is not common  on the Japanese High Speed Rail Network.

  • As it turns out that blunt nose  is possible because tunnels are  

  • built to European standards for  safety and cross section sizes,  

  • unlike the narrow single track tunnels  on the Japanese high speed rail network,  

  • which create tunnel boom and hence necessitate the  long drawn back noses of most Shinkansen trains.

  • As it turns out, this tells the story of  much of the infrastructure and system for  

  • Taiwan High Speed Rail, the system is a hybrid  of Japanese and European high speed rail systems.  

  • The system features Japanese rolling stock,  

  • extensive viaducts, a cut down earthquake  early warning system, and slab track  

  • with European tunneling standards, switches  and train control and signalling systems.

  • The system also provides impressive service  with trains every 10 to 15 minutes all day long,  

  • and with a variety of express and semi-express  services, fares are reasonable and lots of options  

  • are available including free travel for childrenstrong discount fare programs and walk up options.

  • The obvious question is how does  the service perform on ridership?  

  • The system initially had ridership  which fell far below expectations,  

  • but it has grown steadily and surpassed  60 million riders per year in 2017.  

  • Perhaps more importantly though, high speed  trains have had a substantial effect on plane  

  • travel between Western Taiwan's cities as well  as on coach buses, displacing significant CO2  

  • emissions which in my eyes should be seen as  a top priority for any high speed rail system.

  • All of this combines to make the Taiwan High Speed  Rail system one of my favorites in the world,  

  • it combines elements of systems from various  nations while providing a high quality service  

  • to millions of residents all while reducing  GHG emissions and improving interconnection  

  • to local transit systems. The system should in  many ways be looked to as the best example of  

  • a new high speed rail system being built to  serve a high density high demand corridor.

  • Thanks for watching the latest  episode of high speed rail explained!  

  • Make sure to subscribe to the channel for future  videos, and stay tuned for more videos!

Hey folks, welcome back to the channel! At the  end of my last high speed rail explained video  

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台灣高鐵介紹(Taiwan's High Speed Rail System Explained)

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    Alan 發佈於 2021 年 07 月 08 日
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