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  • It was the colonial era in what's now called the United States of America.

    那是現在所謂的美利堅合眾國的殖民時代。

  • A man of the lower classes had been accused by his Puritan overlords of the contemptible

    一個下層階級的人被他的清教徒統治者指責為卑鄙無恥的人。

  • crime of stealing a loaf of bread from the local bakery.

    從當地麵包店偷麵包的罪行;

  • The judge quickly dismissed the man's hunger, saying that an empty stomach was no excuse

    法官很快就駁回了該男子的飢餓感,稱空腹不是藉口。

  • for a person to reduce himself to the state of a vulgar criminal.

    讓一個人淪落到庸俗罪犯的地步;

  • Outside the courthouse, a frantic crowd waited, many of the people armed with wooden paddles,

    在衙門外,一群人瘋狂的等待著,很多人都拿著木槳。

  • feathers, rotten fruit, and the putrid innards of farm animals.

    羽毛,腐爛的水果,還有農場動物的腐爛內臟。

  • The judge, a stern and unforgiving man, looked down at the condemned from his bench.

    法官是一個嚴厲而又不留情面的人,他在法官席上俯視著被判刑的人。

  • “I sentence you to public humiliation,” he said in a grave voice, telling the unfortunate

    "我判處你當眾羞辱。"他語重心長地對不幸的人說。

  • thief he hoped he would see the error of his ways.

    賊他希望他能看到自己的錯誤。

  • For two full days, the condemned had his feet tickled by kids.

    整整兩天,犯人被孩子們撓腳。

  • Bitter neighbors beat his toes with sticks.

    苦逼的鄰居用棍子打他的腳趾頭。

  • Even his acquaintances joined in the fun and covered his face with any kind of garbage

    連他的熟人也加入進來,用任何一種垃圾遮住他的臉

  • they could find.

    他們能找到。

  • Ok, so you might now be thinking that out of all the punishments we've ever talked

    好吧,所以你現在可能會想,在所有的懲罰中,我們曾經談過

  • about, this one doesn't sound too bad at all.

    關於,這個聽起來一點也不差。

  • You're quite sure you could handle a bit of old cabbage being rubbed into your face

    你很確定你能接受一點老白菜被揉進你的臉。

  • and even though the paddle would sting a bit, it's nothing compared to having your head,

    而且即使槳會有點刺痛,但和你的頭相比,這不算什麼。

  • fingers, or toes crushed.

    手指,或腳趾被壓碎。

  • As for tickling, isn't that supposed to be kind of enjoyable?

    至於撓癢癢,是不是應該是一種享受?

  • Well, that's debatable.

    嗯,這是值得商榷的。

  • There's such a thing as tickle torture you know, something that goes back centuries and

    有這樣的事情作為癢癢的折磨,你知道的, 東西是可以追溯到幾個世紀前,和。

  • has been used as a form of interrogation.

    已被用作一種審訊形式。

  • You're not going to die, but when you experience what the Japanese used to callmerciless

    你不會死,但當你經歷了日本人常說的 "無情的

  • ticklingfor hours on end, you're going to lose your mind a bit.

    撓癢癢 "幾個小時,你會有點失去理智。

  • But tickling is just one thing that happened to people in the stocks.

    但撓癢癢只是股票中人的一件事。

  • As you'll find out later in the show, there was also a form of the stocks that result

    在後面的節目中,你會發現,還有一種形式的股票,結果是

  • in a person losing an ear or two, or perhaps a pair of eyes, and if the madding crowd took

    在一個人失去了一兩隻耳朵,或者是一雙眼睛,如果狂亂的人群中採取了

  • a profound disliking to the condemned, well, that person could die in those stocks in the

    如果你對死刑犯深惡痛絕,那麼,這個人可能會死在那些股票裡。

  • most gruesome way.

    最可怕的方式。

  • So, you can stop sneering now about us putting the stocks in the worst punishments series.

    所以,你現在可以不用再譏諷我們把股票列入最嚴重的懲罰系列了。

  • It was for some people.

    對某些人來說是這樣。

  • It was hell on Earth, and the torture was not over quickly.

    這簡直就是人間地獄,折磨也不會很快結束。

  • We're getting ahead of ourselves hereSome of you might not even know what we're talking

    我們在這裡超越了自己......你們中的一些人可能甚至不知道我們在說什麼。

  • about.

    關於。

  • Ok, the stocks.

    好吧,股票。

  • This part of the toolkit of punishers throughout history is one of the easiest to describe

    歷史上懲罰者的工具箱中,這部分是最容易描述的一個環節

  • we've featured.

    我們的特色。

  • The stocks basically consisted of a wooden frame through which a person's legs were

    襪子基本上是由一個木架組成,人的雙腿穿過木架。

  • held.

    舉行。

  • The frame could open up of course so the legs could lie on the lower half, and then the

    當然,框架可以打開,這樣雙腿就可以躺在下半身,然後再把下半身打開。

  • top half went over the top and the thing was lockedlike solid bar handcuffs for the

    上半部分翻過了頂,那東西被鎖住了--就像堅固的條形手銬一樣,對於

  • legs.

    腿。

  • There were other versions of the stocks, but this is the one we'll start with.

    還有其他版本的股票,但這是我們要開始的。

  • They were usually reserved for the lower classes, a distinction that back in the day people

    他們通常是為下層階級保留的,這在以前是人們的區別。

  • didn't mind tagging folks with.

    不介意標記的人與。

  • Being such a simple device you won't be surprised to find out they go back a long

    作為一個簡單的設備,你不會驚訝地發現它們可以追溯到很久以前。

  • way.

    辦法。

  • They even get a mention in the Old Testament, and a couple of Jesus's disciples also once

    他們甚至在《舊約》中得到了提及,耶穌的幾個門徒也曾經提到過

  • found their legs bound in the stocks.

    發現自己的雙腿被捆綁在股票上。

  • You can find that information in the bible in Acts 16:24.

    你可以在《使徒行傳》16:24中找到這些資訊。

  • Apparently, while fastened in they prayed and sang hymns.

    很顯然,在被固定住的時候,他們祈禱,唱讚美詩。

  • This kind of punishment was popular from the 1300s until the mid-1800s, and you won't

    這種刑罰從1300年代一直到18世紀中期都很流行,而且你不會

  • be surprised to hear that the Brits had stocks in most villages and towns.

    驚訝於英國人在大多數村鎮都有股票。

  • Those Puritans that arrived in the New World were also partial to putting folks in the

    那些來到新大陸的清教徒也是偏向於把鄉親們放在。

  • stocks.

    股票。

  • The punishment was supposed to be a public one, thus the person in the stocks was almost

    懲罰應該是公開的,是以,被關在股票裡的人幾乎是。

  • always subjected to humiliation from the people that lived in the vicinity.

    總是受到住在附近的人的羞辱。

  • That's why the stocks were situated in the place where just about everyone passed through.

    這也是為什麼股價坐落在剛要人人經過的地方。

  • The marketplace was often the location of choice.

    市場往往是選擇的地點。

  • Some people might not have known what crime the person had committed, but there was a

    有些人可能不知道這個人犯了什麼罪,但有一個......。

  • solution for this.

    對此的解決方案。

  • Often the condemned would have a letter on their clothing.

    通常被判刑的人的衣服上會有一個字母。

  • An adulterer would get an A, a thief a T, a blasphemer a B, and someone who'd been

    姦夫會得A,小偷會得T,褻瀆者會得B,而一個人被

  • bothersome while under the influence of alcohol, a D for a drunkard.

    在酒精的影響下,麻煩的,D為醉漢。

  • As you'll soon find out, that letter was also sometimes branded on the person's face.

    你很快就會發現,那封信有時也會烙在人的臉上。

  • These crimes were the equivalent of what today you call misdemeanors.

    這些罪行相當於今天你們所說的輕罪。

  • Back then, the person would only get the stocks for petty theft, such as the bread heist we

    那時候,人只有在小偷小摸的情況下才會得到股票,比如我們的麵包搶劫案。

  • earlier described.

    前文所述。

  • For armed robbery, which in the past could have been called highway robbery, a much more

    對於持槍搶劫,過去可以稱為公路搶劫,一個更。

  • brutal kind of stocks awaited.

    殘酷的種股票等待著。

  • We'll get into that soon.

    我們很快就會進入這個問題。

  • One of the reasons why every town and village in England had stocks was mostly down to something

    英格蘭每個城鎮和村莊都有股票的原因之一,主要歸結為以下幾點

  • called the Statute of Laborers 1351.

    稱為《勞動者規約》1351。

  • In short, this was created after the Black Death, which as you know, wiped out vast portions

    簡而言之,這是在黑死病之後產生的,你也知道,黑死病消滅了大量的人。

  • of the public all over Europe, including in England.

    包括英國在內的全歐洲公眾的。

  • Post-plague, the lords of the country were faced with a problem.

    瘟疫過後,各國諸侯都面臨著一個問題。

  • Many of their workers had died and so there weren't enough folks to get the work done.

    他們的很多工人都死了,所以沒有足夠的人去完成工作。

  • The workers who survived, seeing an opportunity, started to demand higher wages.

    活下來的工人看到了機會,開始要求提高工資。

  • Asking for more cash was soon outlawed, as was refusing to work at all, which was a crime

    要求更多的現金很快就被取締了,就像拒絕工作一樣,這是一種犯罪。

  • of idleness.

    的閒置。

  • We found this written in English law.

    我們發現這是用英國法律寫的。

  • Every town and village is to maintain a set of stocks in which to punish vagabonds,

    "每個鎮和村都要保留一套股票,用來懲罰流浪漢。

  • layabouts, and drunkards.”

    外行和酒鬼。"

  • If a person, say a plowman or a servant or shoemaker or a shepherd demanded a higher

    如果一個人,比如說耕夫、僕人、鞋匠或牧羊人,要求更高的工資。

  • wage or refused to work, the resulting punishment was often the stocks.

    工資或拒絕工作,由此產生的懲罰往往是股票。

  • This usually meant being confined to the stocks by their feet, but finger stocks were also

    這通常意味著他們的腳被限制在股上,但手指股也被限制在股上。

  • common.

    常見的。

  • It made no difference really, since the person couldn't go anywhere.

    其實也沒有什麼區別,因為這個人哪裡也去不了。

  • Throughout the centuries it really depended on the crime as to what happened to a person

    幾個世紀以來,一個人的命運如何,真的要看犯罪情況

  • while they sat there in the stocks.

    當他們坐在那裡的股票。

  • If they'd upset the village, perhaps by an act of aggressive drunkenness or speaking

    如果他們讓村子裡的人不高興了,也許是喝醉了酒,或者是說了些什麼話。

  • words that everyone found rather offensive, well, they got more punishment.

    大家都覺得相當不爽的話,嗯,他們得到了更多的懲罰。

  • Sometimes that would just be verbal abuse, along the lines of, “You carbuncle of my

    有時,這只是口頭上的辱罵,如 "你這個我的癰"。

  • eye!

    眼睛

  • You gouty-legged, copper-nosed rogue.”

    你這隻癩蛤蟆腿,銅鼻子的流氓。"

  • Hopefully, YouTube doesn't demonetize for language that was bad 400 years ago.

    ......希望YouTube不要因為400年前的語言不好而停播。

  • All those insults are related to diseases by the way.

    對了,這些侮辱都與疾病有關。

  • Diseases were on people's minds a lot back then, unlike now of course

    那時候人們對疾病的關注度很高,當然不像現在... ...

  • Ok, so you got cursed at, and you had your feet tickledespecially by kidsand

    好吧,所以你被罵了,你有你的腳癢癢 - 特別是孩子們 - 和。

  • you might just get a few kicks to the back and punches in the face.

    你可能只是得到一些踢到後背和拳頭在臉上。

  • It wasn't the end of the world, but it wasn't very nice, either, especially if you were

    這不是世界末日,但也不是很好,特別是如果你是... ...

  • covered in rotten eggs.

    滿身都是臭雞蛋。

  • Are they still used now?

    現在還在用嗎?

  • We found a news article from Columbia which said in 2012 a 34-old year woman and her 18-year

    我們發現了一篇來自哥倫比亞的新聞,說在2012年,一個34歲的女人和她18歲的。

  • old lover were put in the stocks for 3 days for the crime of infidelity.

    舊情人因不忠罪被關進監獄3天。

  • Another case in Colombia involved a young man that was high and attacked his parents.

    哥倫比亞的另一起案件涉及一名年輕男子,他嗑藥後襲擊了他的父母。

  • In 2020, several people in that country were put in the stocks for violating social distancing

    2020年,該國有數人因違反社會疏導規定而被關進了監獄

  • orders in the municipality of Tuchín.

    圖欣市的命令;

  • From what we can see, no eggs or feathers or paddles were used during the ordeal.

    從我們看到的情況來看,在考驗過程中沒有使用雞蛋或羽毛或槳。

  • The punishment almost happened in the USA in 1989 in the small town of Dermott in Arkansas.

    1989年,美國阿肯色州的德莫特小鎮幾乎發生了懲罰。

  • There was a curfew at the time and the punishment was sought after for parents who'd allowed

    當時有宵禁,對於允許父母的懲罰是追尋的。

  • their kids out at night.

    他們的孩子晚上出去。

  • The owner of the Dermott Pawn Shop was one of the people asking for the law to be instituted,

    德莫特當鋪的老闆就是要求制定法律的人之一。

  • saying the kids were out of control and had broken his windows.

    說孩子們失去了控制,並打破了他的窗戶。

  • He thought the stocks would do the trick in changing their wayward behavior.

    他認為股票能起到改變他們的行為方式的作用。

  • Ok, now for something a little more serious.

    好了,現在說點更嚴肅的事。

  • When the stocks got blood on them.

    當股票上有血跡時。

  • For poor folks and their misdemeanors, there were the stocks for the feet, but when the

    對於窮苦人和他們的不軌行為,有股票為腳,但當。

  • poor, or rich for that matter, transgressed in a big way, there was something else.

    窮人,或者富人,大肆越軌,還有其他的事情。

  • This was called the pillory, which was the same idea as the stocks but instead of putting

    這就是所謂的枕頭房,這和股票的想法是一樣的,但不是把。

  • a person's legs between two boards, it was the head and arms that went inside.

    一個人的雙腿在兩塊木板之間,進去的是頭和胳膊。

  • You've likely all seen a fun version of this at country fairs when people throw soaked

    你可能都見過一個有趣的版本,在鄉村集市上,當人們把浸泡的

  • sponges at the condemned.

    在譴責的海綿。

  • Let's go back some time and now think about how it would feel if those sponges were replaced

    讓我們回到過去,現在想一想,如果這些海綿被換掉,會是什麼感覺?

  • with stones and dead animal parts?

    用石頭和動物屍體?

  • How would that feel?

    那會是什麼感覺?

  • What if the person in the stocks had committed a terrible crime in a local town, a crime

    如果被關在股票裡的人在當地的小鎮上犯下了可怕的罪行呢?

  • that made people's blood run cold, a crime of violence?

    讓人熱血沸騰的暴力犯罪?

  • Can you imagine what happened to the person in the pillory?

    你能想象那個在藥房裡的人的下場嗎?

  • Imagine what would happen to them nowadays?

    試想一下,如今他們會怎樣?

  • So, the pillory for one thing was a lot more uncomfortable than the stocks.

    所以,一物降一物的藥房比股票要不舒服得多。

  • The reason being, a person had to bend forward in an awkward position.

    原因是,一個人不得不以一種尷尬的姿勢向前彎腰。

  • It was even more uncomfortable if your ears were nailed to the wood, which happened from

    如果耳朵被釘在木頭上就更不舒服了,這種情況從

  • time to time.

    時而。

  • A lot worse happened, too.

    還有很多更糟糕的事情發生。

  • Nonetheless, you could get out of the pillory almost unscathed just as a person could have

    儘管如此,你可以走出監獄幾乎毫髮無損,就像一個人可以有。

  • gotten out of the stocks with nothing more than an embarrassed look on their face.

    從股票中脫身,臉上只有尷尬的表情。

  • Still, rotten vegetables and buckets of offal and blood were often thrown at someone, but

    不過,腐爛的蔬菜和一桶內臟和血跡還是經常被扔到某人身上,但。

  • worse, the missile of choice was sometimes human or animal excrement.

    更糟糕的是,選擇的飛彈有時是人類或動物的排洩物。

  • Let's now have a look at some examples.

    現在我們來看看一些例子。

  • Unlike the stocks where the poor were fastened, the pillory was the punishment of more well-known

    與固定窮人的股票不同的是,監獄是對更多知名的人的懲罰。

  • people and so there are lots of examples to choose from.

    人,所以有很多例子可以選擇。

  • Take the story of James Nayler, an English Quaker who thought it would be fun to ride

    以英國貴格會教徒詹姆斯-奈勒的故事為例,他認為騎馬很有趣。

  • a horse into the city of Bristol pretending to be Jesus Christ riding into Jerusalem.

    一匹馬進入布里斯托爾城,假裝是耶穌基督騎馬進入耶路撒冷。

  • You couldn't really get away with that back in 1656.

    在1656年的時候,你真的無法逃脫。

  • It offended people.

    它得罪了人。

  • Right after the reenactment he was grabbed by the authorities and charged with the crime

    重演之後,他就被當局抓了起來,並被控以罪名。

  • of blasphemy.

    褻瀆神靈的。

  • Parliament almost decided to execute him, but instead, he ended up in the pillory.

    議會幾乎決定處死他,但他最終卻被送進了監獄。

  • No feathers were used for this man.

    這個人沒有使用羽毛。

  • Once contained in the device he was branded with a red hot poker.

    一旦包含在裝置中,他就被烙上了紅紅的烙印。

  • The brand, which went on his forehead, was the letter B for blasphemer.

    他額頭上的烙印,是褻瀆者的字母B。

  • If that wasn't bad enough, his tongue was pierced with another red hot piece of iron.

    如果這還不夠糟糕,他的舌頭又被一塊紅熱的鐵片刺穿了。

  • Did the crowd feel sorry for him?

    眾人是不是覺得他很可憐?

  • Hell no, they took their turn beating on the guy.

    該死的沒有,他們輪流毆打那個人。

  • He died two years later during his sentence of hard labor.

    兩年後,他在服苦役期間去世。

  • Then there was the pillorying of the famous writer Daniel Defoe.

    然後是對著名作家丹尼爾-笛福的掠奪。

  • You've probably heard of his name from the novel Robinson Crusoe, but he was more than

    你可能從小說《魯濱遜漂流記》中聽說過他的名字,但他不僅僅是...

  • a fiction writer.

    一個小說家。

  • He wrote about society, politics, economics, and culture, but being an outspoken critic

    他寫的是社會、政治、經濟和文化,但作為一個直言不諱的批評家

  • of the way things were back then could result in something much worse than medieval trolling.

    的方式,當時的事情可能會導致更糟糕的東西比中世紀的巨魔。

  • For his thoughts, he was charged with the crime of seditious libel and sent to the pillory.

    因為他的想法,他被指控犯有煽動性誹謗罪,被送進了監獄。

  • The thing was, a large part of the public liked Defoe's writings, and so as the story

    事情是這樣的,很大一部分公眾喜歡笛福的作品,所以隨著故事的發展。

  • goes, no one threw anything at him that could hurt or humiliate.

    去,沒有人向他扔任何能傷害或羞辱他的東西。

  • In fact, it's said that people threw flowers on him during the three days he was stuck

    事實上,據說在他被困的三天裡,人們向他扔了花

  • in that very uncomfortable position.

    在那個非常不舒服的位置。

  • Other controversial writers weren't so lucky.

    其他有爭議的作家就沒那麼幸運了。

  • Sometimes they faced the symbolic gesture of having their ears cut off in the pillory,

    有時,他們面臨著在藥房裡被割掉耳朵的象徵性姿態。

  • an act known ascropping.”

    一種被稱為 "裁剪 "的行為。

  • It happened to Thomas Barrie, who in 1538 was accused of spreading rumors.

    這事發生在托馬斯-巴利身上,他在1538年被指控散佈謠言。

  • It happened to William Prynne and Henry Burton in 1637 because they'd been critical of

    1637年,威廉-白蘭因和亨利-伯頓就發生過這樣的事,因為他們一直在責備威廉-白蘭因和亨利-伯頓。

  • the Church hierarchy.

    教會等級制度。

  • In the US during the 1800s, the people pilloried the most were slaves.

    在19世紀的美國,被掠奪最多的人是奴隸。

  • The punishment didn't usually happen for all the town to see, the slave would be fastened

    懲罰通常不會發生在全城人的眼皮底下,奴隸會被綁起來。

  • in the device where he or she was enslaved.

    在他或她被奴役的設備中。

  • You could find sets of pillories in barns or in the fields.

    你可以在穀倉或田野裡找到成套的枕木。

  • During the slaves' confinement, they would usually be flogged.

    在奴隸被禁錮期間,他們通常會被鞭打。

  • It was reported in 1830 that a slave girl in the British colonies was pilloried by an

    據報道,在1830年,英國殖民地的一名女奴被一名男子掠奪。

  • English woman and she had pepper rubbed in her eyes for 17 days so she couldn't sleep.

    英國女人,她的眼睛裡擦了17天的胡椒粉,所以她睡不著。

  • Now back to the depravity of the town square.

    現在回到城市廣場的墮落。

  • Unlike punishment these days, what happened to a person in the pillory much of the time

    不像現在的刑罰,在很多時候,一個人在藥房裡發生了什麼事?

  • depended wholly on how the crowd felt about someone.

    完全取決於民眾對某人的感覺。

  • That's why writers have said the punishment created a “carnival-like atmosphere” a

    所以作家們都說,這種懲罰營造了一種 "狂歡式的氛圍 "一。

  • kind of theater event that folks really looked forward to.

    樣的戲劇活動,鄉親們真的很期待。

  • If someone had had a bad day at the office (or farm), they could take their anger out

    如果有人在辦公室(或農場)度過了糟糕的一天,他們可以把他們的憤怒發洩出來。

  • on the poor soul who was trapped between the beams.

    在可憐的靈魂誰是被困在梁之間。

  • When a girl named Sarah Thomas stood in the pillory, the crowd gave her wine and hot pot.

    當一個叫莎拉-托馬斯的女孩站在枕頭房裡時,眾人給她酒和火鍋。

  • When in 1751 two highwaymen named Egan and Salmon were subject to the crowds' whims,

    當1751年,兩個名叫伊根和沙門的公路工人受到眾人的異想天開。

  • they were pelted with anything and everything.

    他們被潑了一身的冷水,什麼都有。

  • Egan took a stone to the head that killed him and Salmon died from his injuries after

    伊根拿石頭砸他的頭,使他喪命,而薩爾蒙也因傷勢過重而死。

  • being released from the device.

    從設備中釋放出來。

  • We found a report from 1680 which talked about a midwife named Elizabeth Cellier.

    我們找到了一份1680年的報告,其中提到了一位名叫伊麗莎白-塞利埃的助產士。

  • She was basically an activist back in the day that fought for women's rights and human

    她基本上是當年的一個活動家,為婦女權利和人權而奮鬥的

  • rights in general.

    一般權利。

  • For her service to humanity, this is what she got according to the report:

    報道稱,這是她為人類服務的結果。

  • She had been hauled out of bed, though she could not rise, set on the pillory, twice

    "她被從床上拖起來,雖然她無法起身,被放在枕頭上,兩次

  • struck down with stones by the rabble but lifted up again by the sheriff's officers,

    被烏合之眾用石頭打倒,但又被治安官抬起來。

  • and had been kept there till 2 o'clock, though her sentence was to remain only between 12

    並一直被關在那裡到2點,雖然她的刑期只在12點之間。

  • and 1.

    和1.

  • She had been grievously bruised and, several officers had been wounded in her defense.”

    她被打得傷痕累累,而且,有好幾個軍官在她的防守中受傷。"

  • You heard that right.

    你沒聽錯

  • The mob even got the officers with their missiles.

    暴徒甚至用飛彈打到了軍官。

  • Here's what a newspaper said about highwayman John Waller when he was in the pillory:

    這是報紙上關於公路客約翰-沃勒在監獄裡時的報道。

  • On Tuesday, the 13th of June, 1732, this wicked man was put in the pillory, pursuant

    "1732年6月13日,星期二,這個惡人被關進了監獄,依據是:

  • to his sentence, at the Seven Dials, in London; where, so great was the indignation of the

    他在倫敦七錶盤被判刑。

  • populace, that they pelted him to death.”

    民眾,他們把他砸死了。"

  • Often people were sentenced to two or three times in the pillory, sometimes one week after

    往往有人被判處兩到三次刑罰,有時一週後就會被判處死刑。

  • the other.

    另一個。

  • The weekend was chosen so the crowd was bigger.

    選擇了週末,所以人流量比較大。

  • The scene of the punishment was usually the marketplace.

    懲罰的現場通常是市場。

  • In 1732, a woman named Eleanor Beare was charged with performing an illegal abortion and supplying

    1732年,一位名叫埃莉諾-波爾的婦女被指控進行非法墮胎,並提供以下物品:

  • a man with poison so he could kill someone.

    一個人用毒藥,所以他可以殺人。

  • This kind of thing really rankled the mob and they let that be known.

    這種事情真的讓黑道上的人很不爽,他們也讓人知道了。

  • On her first few hours in the pillory, she was hit with rotten vegetables and mud, but

    在她入獄的頭幾個小時裡,她被打成了爛菜和泥巴,但是... ...

  • it was the stones that drew blood.

    是石頭吸了血。

  • She was then taken back to prison.

    隨後,她被帶回了監獄。

  • The next week, the newspaper wrote that her face was still badly swollen.

    第二週,報紙上寫道,她的臉還是嚴重腫脹。

  • The report noted that again she was pelted withall the apples, eggs, and turnips,

    報道指出,她又被潑了 "所有的蘋果、雞蛋和蘿蔔。

  • that could be bought, begged, or stolenbut also with stones.

    可買、可乞、可偷",但也用石頭。

  • That report said sheappeared a moving heap of filth.”

    那篇報道說她 "出現了一堆移動的髒東西"。

  • She survived, though.

    不過,她還是活了下來。

  • After three years in prison, she apparentlyrecovered her health, her spirits, and

    在監獄裡呆了三年後,她顯然 "恢復了健康,恢復了精神,也恢復了身體。

  • her beauty.”

    她的美麗。"

  • And get this, the fickle mob cheered and played music for her on her release.

    而得到這個,變幻莫測的暴徒在她出獄時為她歡呼並播放音樂。

  • In England, you had such things as Poor Laws and Vagrancy Acts, and that meant if someone

    在英國,你有諸如窮人法和流浪法之類的東西,這意味著如果有人