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  • (TRAIN WHISTLE)

  • (VIOLIN POLKA)

  • What a business this wedding has been, what an expense.

  • You know, sometimes, my dear sister, I envy you your little country parsonage.

  • You two married for love, I know.

  • Now, of course, Edith can afford to do that.

  • Go on, Captain! Dance! Dance with your bride.

  • - You are bored, Miss Margaret. - No.

  • - I'm tired. - Oh.

  • I'm exhausted. And a little too grown-up for ornaments like this.

  • (SIGHS) When I get married, I want to wake up on a sunny day,

  • put on my favorite dress and just walk to the church.

  • There.

  • There. Is that better?

  • - I think you look very well. - (CHUCKLES)

  • You would look very well whatever you wore.

  • (CHUCKLES) I love my cousin dearly. I've been very happy in this house.

  • But I'll be even happier to go home to Helstone, tomorow.

  • Ah, the wonderful Helstone. You cannot be kept away?

  • No. I cannot.

  • It's the best place on earth.

  • (EDITH GIGGLES)

  • (GIGGLING ECHOES)

  • (BIRDSONG)

  • (MAN) Margaret. Is that you?

  • M... Mr. Lennox. W... what's happened?

  • - Is it Edith? Some accident? - No, no, calm yourself. No such calamity.

  • I have come to visit paradise...

  • ...as you suggested.

  • Well...

  • Mr. Lennox.

  • Y... You'd better sit down.

  • (LAUGHS NERVOUSLY)

  • This is home.

  • Mama, you remember Mr. Lennox?

  • Oh, yes. Yes. Yes, of course, I...

  • I could walk this route with my eyes closed.

  • I've been visiting Father's parishioners since I was a very small girl.

  • Did you hear what I just said?

  • - (CHURCH BELL RINGING) - Sorry, I...

  • I was just remembering your prescription for a perfect wedding.

  • "I should like to walk to church on a sunny morning."

  • Was this the path you were describing?

  • Why, yes, I suppose so, I...

  • wasn't actually thinking of MY wedding, you understand.

  • - I was wondering, Margaret, whether... - Please, don't won...

  • ...whether you might consider making that walk,

  • sharing that morning with one who... Please, listen.

  • Please. Don't continue.

  • I'm sorry.

  • Excuse me. I...

  • You led me to believe that such an offer would not be unwelcome.

  • A London girl would know not to talk of wedding days in such ambiguous terms.

  • Excuse me, I... said nothing I am ashamed of.

  • I... I'm sorry if you have been mistaken in my affections for you.

  • Is there someone else, someone else you prefer?

  • No.

  • I do like you, Henry.

  • But I am not ready to marry anyone. You must believe that I mean what I say.

  • Henry, I...

  • ...I- I'm sorry.

  • (COUGHING) We'll be on the streets...

  • in a strange place.

  • Mama, I told you, we'll stay at a hotel until we find a house. It won't take long.

  • Perhaps Dixon and I could stay on the coast while you look.

  • Yes... as the misses is so delicate.

  • No, Maria. Your place is with us. It will not take us long to find a house.

  • My old college friend, Mr. Bell, has agreed to help.

  • He's already organized a list of potential pupils. There'll be plenty of teaching for me.

  • There will be no people there like us in Milton. How can there be?

  • We will manage, Mother. It's not another planet.

  • (GUARD) Outward, Milton!

  • Outward, Milton!

  • All change!

  • All change for stations north!

  • (WEEPING) Why have we come here, Dixon?

  • It's going to be awful.

  • - I know it is. - Shh.

  • - Outward, Milton! - Dixon. Take care and find a porter.

  • We have arrived.

  • - All change! - (WHISTLE BLOWS)

  • (GIRL) I see 'im!

  • Porter! Take these, please.

  • (GUARD BLOWS WHISTLE)

  • We'll find a house faster if we go separately.

  • - Are you sure? - Of course.

  • Eggs, fresh-laid eggs this mornin'! Come and get your eggs!

  • (BARROWMEN SHOUT)

  • Fresh fruits! Fresh fruits! Fruit and vegetables!

  • - (MAN) Hello, how are you? - (MAN) All right.

  • (CHICKENS SQUAWKING)

  • - The living room's quite spacious as you can see - The property's not for me.

  • I'm enquiring on behalf of one of me master's business acquaintances.

  • The man is still living as a clergyman. Or rather a former clergyman.

  • He's used to living simply. He's never been a man of great property or fortune.

  • (MUFFLED TALK)

  • - A matter of conscience, I believe. - Ah, conscience.

  • That never put bread on the table.

  • - South, eh? - Mm-hm.

  • A little, er... indiscretion took place, maybe?

  • Well, they do say the Devil makes work for idle hands.

  • - Maybe his hands weren't so idle. - (BOTH MEN CHUCKLE)

  • - He'll find things a mite different up north. - Oh, aye.

  • I'll make good the repairs, but the decoration's good enough.

  • What a business, eh? For a man to uproot his wife and child come all the way to Milton.

  • Conscience or no conscience, that's strange behavior.

  • - Excuse me, madam, can I help you? - My name is Margaret Hale. Who are you?

  • I'm Williams, Mr. Thornton's overseer.

  • He asked me to look out properties for your father.

  • How much is the rent for the year?

  • These are details that Mr. Thornton will discuss it with your father. No need to concern yourself in money matters ma'am

  • I've no idea who your Mr. Thornton is. I thank him for his trouble,

  • but my father and I are sharing the task of securing a property.

  • I have spent two days viewing what Milton has to offer,

  • so I have a fairly good idea of price.

  • - Mr. Thornton thinks this will do very well for you father. - Where is Mr. Thornton?

  • - Excuse me? - Take me to see this Mr. Thornton.

  • If he won't deal with me, I'll have to deal with him.

  • - Does Mr. Thornton live here? - Aye, but he'll be at work.

  • Stay here, miss. I'll find Master.

  • (COUGHS)

  • (COUGHS)

  • (MUFFLED CLATTERING)

  • (MACHINES CLATTERING)

  • Stephens!

  • Put that pipe out!

  • I saw you!

  • Stephens!

  • Stephens!

  • Come here!

  • (STEPHENS GRUNTS)

  • - Smoking again. - I wasn't!

  • - Where is it? - I wasn't smoking, I swear.

  • Still warm. I warned you.

  • No! No! Please, sir!

  • - Please don't... Please! - You stupid... idiot!

  • - Please! - Look at me!

  • - Look at me! - (MARGARET) Stop!

  • - Stop! Please, stop! - Who are you? What are you doing in here?

  • - My name is Margaret Hale. - Miss Hale!

  • - Sorry, Mr. Thornton, I told her to stay in the office. - Get her out of here!

  • Aye, crawl away on your belly and don't come back!

  • Please, sir... I have little ones.

  • You know the rules!

  • - My children will starve! - Better they starve than burn to death!

  • Get out before I call the police! Get that woman out of here!

  • Please, miss.

  • Miss. Miss, please.

  • Miss, please, miss... Please!

  • (EDITH) My darling Margaret, we are back at last from our honeymoon in Corfu.

  • We've been away so long I'm almost fluent in Greek - or so the Captain says.

  • But you know, everything he says is always so agreeable.

  • Dear Margaret... Now I'm going to say something that will make you very angry,

  • but I can't help it.

  • What was Uncle thinking of, taking you all so far away from home?

  • Why on earth are you in that awful place where they make cotton,

  • where no one who is anyone wishes to buy it?

  • I am sure we'll always wear linen.

  • (MARGARET) Dear Edith, I'm pleased to report

  • that we've replaced the horrible wallpapers with altogether more agreeable colors.

  • Dixon has only - if you think this possible - grown in energy.

  • She has set herself the task of engaging an under-maid,

  • but as yet there isn't anyone within a radius of 50 miles

  • who is remotely suitable to wait on us hand and foot.

  • I'll sit, if you don't mind (!)

  • Hm. You'll be expected to be well up before the family to light the fires.

  • I'm sorry, I'm not getting up at five in the morning.

  • And I'm not working for those wages.

  • I can get four shillings as a piecer at Hamper's.

  • Anyway, if you don't mind me asking,

  • where's the money coming from to pay for me?

  • This house must be £30 a year, and there's not much coming in from what I've heard.

  • I'll come and go as I please!

  • And I don't need no bossy, jumped-up servant

  • to tell me what's what and how to behave! You can keep your rotten job!

  • Me, a servant, indeed (!)

  • I don't know what the master was thinking of, subjecting us to all this gossip!

  • Margaret?

  • What's the matter?

  • (CLEARS THROAT)

  • There is some talk...

  • Margaret?

  • Margaret? What does she mean, talk?

  • I did hear some people talking, when we were house-hunting.

  • About why we moved to Milton... so abruptly. Why you left the church.

  • People are... talking?

  • Well, it's only natural, after all, that people should wonder.

  • It's not usual for clergymen to leave their parish,

  • travel hundreds of miles, as if to escape something.

  • Just because we follow you without question...

  • (OPENS LETTER)

  • It's from the bishop.

  • - It's not about Frederick? - No. I keep that letter with me all times.

  • To reassure me that I made the right decision.

  • I... is this all?

  • "I ask that all rectors in the diocese of the New Forest

  • "reaffirm their belief in the Book of Common Prayer."

  • Exactly. The effrontery! The man's ten years our junior.

  • He tries to treat us all like children.

  • But this is a formality, surely... to reaffirm.

  • My conscience will not let me.

  • I can and have lived quietly with my doubts for...

  • well, for some years now, but...

  • I cannot swear publicly to doctrines I am no longer sure of.

  • Now, we men of conscience have to make a stand.

  • - We? - Yes, there are others who have doubts.

  • We all agreed. We could not reaffirm.

  • Are you telling me that all the rectors of the New Forest

  • have decamped to industrial towns?

  • Well...

  • some thought it possible to yield,

  • but... I did not.

  • - How many? How many refused? - I could not avoid it. I was forced into it.

  • You must understand.

  • I understand

  • (INHALES SHARPLY)

  • I understood...

  • that the very worst must have happened...

  • that you had lost your faith...

  • or that you felt that God wished you to preach His word in these new places.

  • That some very great matter must have happened to make you uproot us all,

  • dragging us up to this God-forsaken place!

  • - Maria. - You gave up your livelihood...

  • ...our source of income...

  • ...on a formality. - It was not like that, Maria.

  • Really. It IS not like that.

  • I already have work, teaching.

  • And I... I will find more.

  • And... and maybe I will discover

  • that is my real vocation after all.

  • The people here don't want learning.

  • They don't want books

  • and culture.

  • It's all money and smoke.

  • That's what they eat and breathe.

  • - (BABY CRYING) - (MARGARET) You're right, Edith.

  • Milton is very far from home,

  • but it is quite an interesting and modern sort of place.

  • There are at least 20 mills, all very prosperous, in and around the town,

  • and it's full of new industry of one sort or the other.

  • It is of course not remotely green like Helstone,

  • and so large that I often lose my way.

  • But the people are friendly enough

  • and there is nearly always someone to point me in the right direction.

  • (HORNS BLAST)

  • (RUSHING FOOTSTEPS)

  • (URGENT CHATTER)

  • 'Ey up, what have we got here?

  • Watch out, lass!

  • - (RAUCOUS LAUGHTER) - (WOMAN) 'Scuse us!

  • (GASPS) Please.

  • Please... Please don't.

  • Just stop.

  • - Please... please stop. - (RAUCOUS LAUGHTER)

  • - Leave the lass alone. - Here y'are!