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  • Thankyou.

  • Well, it has been a great pleasure to meet you Sam, and Lin.

  • Yes, we've enjoyed meeting you too Victor.

  • Yes, it's been great. What a pity you have to go home.

  • Well, all good things must come to an end. But I'm sure we'll meet again.

  • Yes, I hope so.

  • And good luck with your business. I'm sure it will go well.

  • And I wish you every success too.

  • Well, I think we should drink a toast to the end of the conference, and to ourselves. Here's

  • to us. Cheers

  • Cheers

  • Cheers.

  • We should keep in touch.

  • Yes. Have I given you my card?

  • No - thanks very much. Here's mine.

  • Do you have a card Lin?

  • Yes.

  • Thank you. I'll send you an email. And if you're ever in Singapore, you must look me

  • up.

  • We certainly will. And you have my number. When you're next in Sydney, give me a call

  • - we'll have a drink.

  • May I take these?

  • Well, I'd better get going or I'll miss my flight.

  • Have a good flight home. Bon voyage.

  • Goodbye. Until next time.

  • Goodbye. For the final program in the series we're

  • looking at some of the phrases you may use when you're saying goodbye to someone - either

  • for a short time, or a long time. In our example, Victor is from another country, and he's about

  • to go back home. At a conference, he's met Sam and Lin.

  • It has been a great pleasure to meet you Sam and Lin.

  • We've enjoyed meeting you too Victor.

  • Yes, it's been great. What a pity you have to go home.

  • There are various phrases you can use to express how enjoyable it was to meet someone. Which

  • one you use depends on how well you got to know them. Practise some of these phrases

  • with Victor. It's been a great pleasure to meet you.

  • I have enjoyed meeting you.

  • I'm so glad to have met you.

  • Nice to meet you. The phrase 'nice to meet you' would be used

  • after one short meeting. You can also use this phrase when you are introduced to someone.

  • What about the replies? Practise them with Lin.

  • Nice to meet you. You too.

  • It's been a pleasure to meet you. And you.

  • Glad to have met you. Glad to have met you too.

  • Notice that the reply should match the statement. So if someone says: I have enjoyed meeting

  • you, the reply can be, So have I.

  • If someone says, "It's been a pleasure to meet you," the reply can be, "A pleasure to

  • meet you too", or just "And you". Victor also says, "I'm sure we'll meet again."

  • Here are some useful phrases to do with meeting again. Practise them with Victor.

  • I'm sure we'll meet again.

  • Hopefully we'll meet again.

  • I hope we'll meet again soon. Notice again here that the reply should match

  • the statement, so if someone says, "I'm sure we'll meet again," then the reply also uses

  • 'am': So am I. After the statement, "I hope we'll meet again", the reply should be, "So

  • do I".

  • Another part of saying goodbye can be wishing someone well for the future.

  • And good luck with your business. I'm sure it will go well.

  • And I wish you every success too. Sam proposes a toast. Watch how he does this.

  • Well, I think we should drink a toast to the end of the conference, and to ourselves. Here's

  • to us. Cheers.

  • Cheers.

  • Cheers. This is an informal toast. Sam says, "I think

  • we should drink a toast".

  • Another phrase he could use is 'Let's drink to'. For example, 'Let's drink to the end

  • of the conference' or 'Let's drink to our future meeting'. Then they clink their glasses

  • together and say 'Cheers'.

  • Here's another version of the toast: Let's drink to our next meeting.

  • Our next meeting!

  • Cheers And of course, the toast doesn't have to be

  • alcohol, it can be any kind of drink.

  • The next part of their conversation is about keeping in touch, or keeping in contact.

  • We should keep in touch.

  • Yes. Have I given you my card?

  • No - thanks very much. Here's mine.

  • Do you have a card Lin?

  • Yes.

  • Thank you. I'll send you an email. Repeat the phrases after Sam.

  • We must keep in touch.

  • We must keep in contact.

  • Here's my card.

  • Would you like my card?

  • Do you have a card? The next part of their conversation is about

  • meeting again. Listen: And if you're ever in Singapore, you must

  • look me up.

  • We certainly will. And you have my number. When you're next in Sydney, give me a call

  • - we'll have a drink. To 'look someone up' just means to arrange

  • a meeting. When Victor says, "You must look me up", he is inviting Sam and Lin to meet

  • him if they are in Singapore. This is more of a social invitation, than a business one.

  • Using the word 'must' is not like an order here - it suggests that Victor will be very

  • happy if Sam sees him in Singapore.

  • In the same way, Sam says, "Give me a call" to Victor. It sounds like an order, but in

  • fact it's an invitation. It's important to get the intonation - the way you say it - right,

  • so that it sounds like an invitation, and not an order.

  • You must look me up when you're in Singapore.

  • And if I don't?

  • I'll never speak to you again! Practise these kinds of invitations with Victor.

  • You must look me up next time you're in town.

  • You must come and see me.

  • Why don't you give me a call when you're in town?

  • Ring me if you're in town. Finally let's look at how the three friends

  • say goodbye. Remember this is a semi-formal situation.

  • Well, I'd better get going or I'll miss my flight.

  • Have a good flight home. Bon voyage.

  • Goodbye. Until next time.

  • Goodbye. There are a few ways of saying goodbye but

  • the simplest and best is simply 'good bye'. Sam says "bon voyage" - a French phrase which

  • is also quite common for someone who is travelling.

  • Now, let's review and practise some of the phrases we've learnt today.

  • It's been a pleasure to meet you.

  • I'm sure we'll meet again.

  • We must keep in touch.

  • Give me a call when you're in town.

  • I've enjoyed meeting you.

  • I wish you every success for the future.

  • May I give you my card?

  • Best wishes for the future.

  • I hope you have a good flight home. The language you use in each situation may

  • be slightly different depending on how well you know the other people, and how friendly

  • you are with them. If the situation is social, and you have become quite friendly, you may

  • use slightly less formal language. But it's important not to forget the usual expressions

  • of good wishes - such as for a good flight home, and to say how you've enjoyed meeting

  • the other person. But don't go too far. Well, I'd better get going or I'll miss my

  • flight.

  • I'm going to miss you Victor.

  • So am I. What will we do without you?

  • Be strong.

  • Will we meet again?

  • I know we will.

  • Goodbye.

  • Goodbye Victor - and bon voyage.

  • You forgot my card! Well, I've enjoyed helping you with The Business

  • of English, and I hope you've enjoyed learning some useful phrases and expressions in English

  • - and that you'll be able to put them into practice soon.

  • Goodbye and good luck!

Thankyou.

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A2 初級

The Business of English - Episode 15: Until next time(下回見) (The Business of English - Episode 15: Until next time)

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    Ching Hung Lin 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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