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  • Welcome back to top words.

  • My name is Alicia, and in this episode we're going to talk about 10 words for injuries.

  • So let's get started.

  • Break fracture.

  • The first word is break or fracture, so these two verbs are used interchangeably.

  • Actually, they both refer to a broken bone or a fractured bone so two pieces of bone become separated or a bone becomes broken so fractured it comes apart.

  • So to break a bone in present tense is I broke a bone in past tense Fracture is a regular for, which means the past tense is fractured.

  • So in a sentence, I broke my wrist when I fell snowboarding.

  • That's true.

  • That's true.

  • I broke my wrist when I felt a little warning, and that inspired today's lesson sprain.

  • The next word is spraying sprain to spraying.

  • Something refers Teoh A refers to hurting or two injuring a ligament.

  • So a ligament.

  • Are these sort of like fibrous things, like kind of Ah, they connect their the parts of the body inside your body.

  • They connect bones, two muscles, our bones to ER to like organs.

  • They hold the parts of the body together inside.

  • So a sprain is damaged to a ligament.

  • A sprain.

  • So we can say, for example, to sprain a part of the body.

  • A specific part of the body.

  • Um, some common examples come from sports injuries like he sprained his ankle playing basketball last week, or I sprained my wrist.

  • Ah, working in the garden or something, I don't know, but I think a sprain happens when you push the like the joint or you push that part of the body beyond the possible or the reasonable range of motion.

  • So my example.

  • Sudden has already said it, but he sprained his ankle at the basketball game last week.

  • Bruise.

  • The next word is bruised Bruce, So a bruise refers to taking like a taking an impact, something that's not a sharp impact.

  • It's usually like a blunt impact, I suppose.

  • I don't know, kind of depends, but anyway, ah, bruise.

  • We can use it as a noun or as a verb, actually, to Bruce, something means you damage usually like this.

  • The a certain area of skin and blood collects under the skin, creating like a black or blue, or maybe even like greenish color purple, maybe to use it as a noun.

  • We can say that that spot is a bruise.

  • We refer to that damaged area as a bruise to use it as a verb.

  • However, we can say I bruised my arm or I bruised my leg.

  • So to bruise something means to cause damage.

  • But it's like under the skin.

  • We can see the color change because of the damage, the blood collecting there.

  • So that's to bruise something in ascendance.

  • I bruised my arm when I ran into the door cut.

  • The next word is cut cut, so cut is done with a sharp object.

  • It cut.

  • A cut refers to an injury, which causes blood to emerge, usually unless it's a very shallow cut.

  • Shallow is the opposite of deep, so a cut is caused by a sharp object.

  • So a knife is probably the most common thing that comes to mind when talking about cuts, though another very common type of cut is called a paper cut as a noun.

  • So if you've ever tried to take a piece of paper and the paint.

  • The piece of paper has kind of made a small cut on your hand that's called a paper cut, a paper cut.

  • So it's that kind of slice motion that injures the body is a cut all right in a sentence.

  • Be careful not to cut yourself when using a knife wound.

  • The next word is wound wound, so a wound is just a place of injury on the body.

  • We have a couple of different words we can use to be specific about wounds there, like an open wound and a closed wound, I suppose you could say, But usually people say things like Don't touch open wounds.

  • So an open wound is usually like a fresh wound.

  • So something has been recently damaged on the body recently injured, and the wound is fresh.

  • Maybe we can see blood.

  • Or maybe we could see into the body or something that's considered an open wound.

  • So a closed wound would be perhaps a wound, which has been fixed by a doctor or for small wounds like maybe the body has created a a new layer over the top of the wound that's called a scab.

  • You, you scabs you, but that's that's not an open wound then, but we should still care for it.

  • So a wound is a place on the body that is injured in some way a wound.

  • Um, that's used as a noun.

  • We can also use wound as a verb, which means to hurt something like I wounded my arm.

  • But wound is not so common, and I think in everyday speech.

  • Instead, we use the verb hurt.

  • I hurt my arm, but I'll talk more about this later.

  • So in a sentence, don't touch open wounds.

  • Inger.

  • The next word is injure.

  • Injure.

  • So I've been talking a little bit about the word injure.

  • To injure means to hurt a part of the body.

  • So to injure your arm, to injure your head, to injure your neck thes mean to take damage on that part of the body to injured something.

  • Um, so it's typically a bad thing to injure something.

  • Ah, the noun form of this word is injury injury.

  • So I have an injury.

  • We use this word more with ah likes prep sports, I guess Military.

  • I guess so.

  • But for for every day, like just small.

  • I don't know.

  • For small injuries, I suppose, like paper cuts, for example, Or, like maybe a cooking accident?

  • Um, I suppose we don't really say injury.

  • We will say we'll use the verb hurt.

  • Actually.

  • Again, I'll talk about that word a little later.

  • But injury injury is damaged.

  • Taking damage to a part of the body in a sentence.

  • She injured her shoulder this morning.

  • Tear.

  • The next word is tear tear.

  • Be careful.

  • This word is spelled T e a r.

  • It looks like tear, but used as a verb.

  • It is tear tear to talk about an injury.

  • So a tear if you can imagine, like a piece of paper when we want to Ah, separate it into two pieces.

  • We can tear the piece of paper.

  • Now imagine that same idea, but with a muscle in the body.

  • So a muscle tear refers to that kind of damage to the muscle.

  • So quite painful.

  • I think you can imagine.

  • So to tear a muscle requires, yes, some serious recovery time.

  • I imagine I have never torn a muscle.

  • Yeah, that's a good point.

  • The past participle form is Tord Tauron.

  • Have you ever Tauron a muscle or in the past tense.

  • The past tense is tour.

  • I tour my shoulder muscle last week.

  • Awful, awful in a sentence.

  • Tearing a muscle is painful.

  • Po pull pull.

  • So we use pull again with muscles.

  • But this is different from tear, so to tear a muscle refers to this kind of break motion.

  • So to pull a muscle means to stretch a muscle too much.

  • So it's the muscle is like, just taken beyond its limits, essentially, and so it kind of causes some discomfort.

  • There's kind of a bad feeling in the muscle.

  • Ah, a sentence.

  • I think I pulled a muscle.

  • Ouch!

  • Dislocate, dislocate, dislocate.

  • So here we see the word locate referring to location and dis dis, which means not in other words, so to dislocate.

  • Something refers to removing a part of the body from its correct position and shifting it slightly.

  • So this is something that you hear with joint.

  • So a joint is a part of the body where two things come together.

  • So, for example, of a shoulder, we can talk about the shoulder and dislocate together.

  • So if we say a sentence like I think I dislocated my shoulder.

  • Maybe the correct position of part of the shoulder is to fit into another bone like this.

  • But maybe dislocating the shoulder means like it moved this way, or I don't know how to dislocate a shoulder.

  • But either way, the correct position is here.

  • The dislocated position is maybe here here, I don't know.

  • So the bone is not broken.

  • There's no crack.

  • There's no break there.

  • It's just a shift in position.

  • So the word we use is dislocate to dislocate something in a sentence.

  • He dislocated his shoulder and popped it back into place.

  • Hurt hurt to hurt something.

  • I've talked about this verb a few times already in this lesson, but to hurt means to injure or to wound.

  • It's like the very general verb that we can use to describe all damage to the body.

  • So hurt generally means kind of a small injury like, Ah, I hurt my finger.

  • I slammed it in the door, or I think I hurt my arm playing tennis last week.

  • We usually use this for kind of minor injuries, not such big injuries.

  • So in this case, for example, if I say I hurt my wrist it sounds a little too minor.

  • Actually, this is probably a more severe injury.

  • I would probably say, Yeah, I I broke my wrist.

  • I would use something very specific instead of hurt.

  • To refer more generally to just small every day.

  • Damage to the body, you can say hurt.

  • We also use this word to refer to pain in the body to like how my arm hurts how my wrist hurts.

  • Instead of saying painful, we use the verb hurts more often, so it's less natural to say my wrist is so painful.

  • Instead, we say my wrist hurts.

  • It hurts, is better than painful.

  • So try that out in a sentence.

  • I hurt myself a lot on accident, So those are 10 words you can use to talk about injuries.

  • I hope that that's helpful for you.

  • And now you have some specific vocabulary to talk about the various ways.

  • Weaken, damage our body.

  • If you have any questions or comments, or if you want to share about a time you were injured.

  • Please let us know in the comments section below this video.

  • If you like the video, please make sure to give it a thumb's up subscribe to our channel if you haven't already and check us out of English Class 101 dot com for some more.

  • Good resource is thanks very much for watching this episode of top words.

  • And I will see you again soon by my It's kind of a terrible image.

  • A terrible image.

  • Ah, that I'm very sorry.

  • Way can call that a now waken call that announced This is a noun.

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學習英語中傷害的10大詞彙 (Learn the Top 10 Words for Injuries in English)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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