Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • you guys.

  • It's about to get serious.

  • Hang on.

  • Yeah, Real serious.

  • Um oh, no, no, no.

  • Back one.

  • There we go.

  • Uh, just for a heads up.

  • That shot of me proudly wearing a towel and a tampering with clothes pins on my head on the right was, um, taken in October.

  • So here we go.

  • I've got good news and bad news, and I'm going to tell you the bad news.

  • First, the bad news is you're going to spend the rest of your lives trying to get back to the place where you were when you were a child, and everything felt fearless and effortless and curious.

  • But the good news is you get the chance to spend the rest of your life trying to get back to the place where you were when you were a child and everything felt effortless.

  • Okay, So the theme for this year's Ted X's revision Not that anybody has heard that word yet today.

  • Um, there are a lot of different ways to look at it.

  • And on the one hand, we have no choice in the matter.

  • Right?

  • Life is a constant series of molting, constant series of experiences And if we are awake enough to absorb those experiences, life is a constant path of evolution.

  • So, really, this theme is about the universality of what it means to be alive, which is a very challenging question to answer in the context of a 15 minute talk, more or less, let's bring it into a personal life perspective.

  • Might I'll give you some background?

  • I spent the better part of seven years of my childhood sailing around the world with my family, my older sister, my mom and my dad.

  • When you drop that on people, you usually hear things like Oh my God, what a unique experience.

  • You are so fortunate.

  • This is true.

  • Wow, you must have had such incredible adventures.

  • You're so blessed, this perspective that you must have had you have the best childhood.

  • This is true.

  • What is also true is that I grew up with an enormous amount of free floating anxiety that I spent a very long time in therapy trying to figure out and a really a yearning for roots and stability and freedom, and that might sound like a paradox.

  • But when you spend several years on a really small vessel with just your family.

  • Your life is deeply confined.

  • If you add to that the fact that you never have a chance to put down roots, you start to feel settled.

  • You start to feel familiar.

  • Time to go to the next place.

  • As a child, you have no control over this.

  • Furthermore, because there was always this undercurrent of tension, this potential for danger potential for rials survival situations.

  • I celt as a young child that it was my job to be as good and as quiet and as well behaved as possible to stay out of the way of the grown ups keeping us safe, which of course leads you to a tendency to be selective with your feelings.

  • You tamp them down.

  • You have a tendency to pretend that everything is nice and good and happy all the time.

  • Well, that's not realistic.

  • Life isn't happy and nice all the time.

  • Nothingness.

  • You see where I'm going As a young, sensitive creative kid yearning to express that which we've been taught to tamp down, yearning to feel music became my outlet became my source of expression and music.

  • You're allowed to be dramatic and music you're allowed to stop your feet and music.

  • You're allowed to dance.

  • You're allowed to sing about sorrow.

  • You're allowed to scream if the song calls for it.

  • Right?

  • So this childhood it was a gift.

  • It laid the foundation for my path as a creative.

  • So I grew up.

  • I went to school.

  • I became a singer songwriter.

  • I spent the better part of 20 years earning my living recording, performing, touring.

  • Um, and a bunch of other life happened, too.

  • But a couple of things happen.

  • As I got close to 40 I went through a really tough break up.

  • I was burned out.

  • I was exhausted, and I joined my family's boat business and as a new kind of structure took the place of my old life.

  • And as the concerns of making rent and booking the next gig fell away, I was given the mental time and freedom to sit back and really think about my life.

  • Why had I done what I had done?

  • Why do we define success the way we define it?

  • Why did I feel like such a failure?

  • What do you do when you wake up and you realize you didn't make it.

  • Well, in my case, I got fairly depressed.

  • I come from a pretty accomplished family, and like a lot of American families, that accomplishment is measured in terms of financial gain and public recognition.

  • Okay, so I paid rent for 17 years.

  • So what?

  • I didn't sell out arenas.

  • Why do I even care?

  • What was I trying to prove?

  • It came down to this overriding question.

  • What does it mean to be a creative when that has been your life's identity and no longer pays all your bills?

  • Heads up?

  • This is a work in progress, so I do not have it all figured out.

  • If you're looking for one definitive answer, If I had it completely figured out, I doubt very much I would be here.

  • I would be ascended laughing at everybody from the next dimension.

  • So but you remember my opening statement about the young child?

  • I'm about to get back to that.

  • Okay, so a couple of years ago, a dear friend of mine called me up and she said, Sarah, it's the weirdest thing.

  • I have this feeling.

  • You're supposed to write a book, and my response was like, What?

  • I'm a songwriter I like short structure structure.

  • I like those boundaries within which I can go crazy, right?

  • Stability and freedom.

  • I mean, I've, you know, blogged.

  • I've written some articles but a book.

  • Then she said, and I think it's supposed to be a Children's book and you're supposed to illustrate it.

  • To which my response was laughter.

  • Because I am the world's worst visual artist.

  • I cannot draw.

  • There's no talent there.

  • I like to doodle.

  • Doodling is very different.

  • Never will I show my doodles.

  • And also Children's book.

  • Well, she said.

  • Well, maybe it's a metaphor for the feel of childhood.

  • I don't know, keep in your back pocket.

  • So I did mostly for gotten.

  • And then last year, I quit my job.

  • After seven years, it didn't fit me anymore.

  • Okay, here we go again.

  • Change what now and now I'm 47 years old, and I'm thinking I'm going to dive back into music and do you want with it?

  • I'm not sure.

  • So I let it rides.

  • I started writing songs again, and there was one song in particular that just came pouring out, which is what happens when, um, my favorite songs come.

  • It's like a channeling.

  • It's like if I could just get out of the way long enough, the thing is going to make itself shown to me.

  • Well, what showed itself to me in this and you'll forgive me for messing around with the guitar because, um, this is a loner and we had to borrow somebody's shoe lace, and I don't know whose shoe lace it waas.

  • So whoever you are, thank you.

  • And I hope you get your shoe lace back to make the to make this work.

  • Um, add to that the fact that I just forgot my cape.

  • Oh, so we're going to transpose this song.

  • But anyway, what showed itself to me was so interesting.

  • It was a dialogue, and that hasn't happened to me much before.

  • It was called Do you hear the call?

  • And I've always felt this calling.

  • It's his undefined thing, this yearning that I've expressed through music.

  • But in this case, it was my self now talking to my very young childhood self, and I was telling already, Come in, plop yourself down and tell me your stories and it went something like this, but in a different key.

  • Come on in.

  • Sit with me.

  • Way.

  • What?

  • She has Get up and okay.

  • Do you hear the call?

  • Remember?

  • Be little digging in the dirt.

  • I remember.

  • Remember how cold do you hear?

  • Four.

  • Anyway, it goes on, but I'm running out of time.

  • So But I did finish it.

  • It is a really It's an entire song.

  • But what I realized Waas that child, she was fearless.

  • That child, you know, learning to tamp down your feelings and anxiety.

  • Whatever.

  • Notwithstanding that child would look at approaching a new Anchorage even if she had been seasick and throwing up for days with nothing but excitement, her first thoughts were I wonder what new friends I'm going to make.

  • I wonder what I'll see you the first time I go snorkeling.

  • Fearless.

  • I haven't visit memory of being.

  • I think it was the Solomon Islands when I was five or six years old.

  • And a boy came out in his canoe and he had some wood and a knife and he started wiggling and I was into it.

  • We didn't speak each other's language.

  • It was about the play.

  • He brought some extra wood for me.

  • He wanted me to try it, and I did.

  • It was he was building, Ah, carving a miniature dugout canoe.

  • Mine didn't work.

  • It wasn't a canoe.

  • Of course it wasn't.

  • It was It was a stick with a with a chunk notched out of it.

  • But I didn't care.

  • It was about the experience, right?

  • Fearless.

  • And then I realized, Oh, my God, I've been spending the rest of my life trying to get back to that kid.

  • That's what the urine and has been about.

  • That's what the calling has been about.

  • I never cared about making it.

  • Really.

  • I never cared about proving myself better than you.

  • I just wanted to sing.

  • I just wanted to play.

  • I just wanted to feel holy moly.

  • When we're very young, we don't judge until we're told to.

  • We don't feel shame until we're told to.

  • We don't worry about feeling until we're told to.

  • Okay, I get it.

  • We live in a fairly primitive world, and it can be quite brutal.

  • And some of this is for our own good, right?

  • We have to have some rules.

  • We have to figure out how to get along, but how far off balance we get, Okay, So I'm a 47 year old.

  • Used to be independent singer, songwriter chick who doesn't want to go back to the old ways.

  • And now what?

  • Well, I wrote the book.

  • I wrote the book with my terrible visual artistic abilities.

  • I didn't want Thio, but that song, that song fell to me like a picture book.

  • So I wrote the lyrics in my equally terrible handwriting, and I illustrated it.

  • I illustrated it as an act of defiance.

  • I illustrated it as a statement of alliance with that young child.

  • I illustrated it as a tribute to unself conscious creation.

  • I illustrated as a call to everyone to put down the measuring stick by which all other accomplishments are defined, and drop the insecurity and just draw or just sing or just right, or just fill in the blank.

  • When you do that, something will happen, something will happen, and it might be the last thing you expect.

  • But some was gonna happen.

  • And what you do with that thing is gonna take you to the next thing and the next thing and the next.

  • And you might look up one day and find that you are happily married that you have a beautiful home in Phoenix, Arizona, of all places that you are helping your talented designer wife, her projects and your meeting and engaging with all these artists you never knew existed.

  • And people are responding to your weird pseudo not Children's book that's actually for grown ups and asking them to be more like kids again.

  • And you're writing more songs.

  • You might so at the end of it, look, here's the thing about revision.

  • Revision happens whether we like it or not.

  • But when we take an active part an hour revising when we shed the mantle of insecurity around which everybody else's opinions matter and around which everything else has been defined about how our revision should look, the most beautiful surprises await thanks.

you guys.

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

A2 初級

你聽到呼喚了嗎|Sarah Dashew|TEDxWakeForestU (Do You Hear the Call | Sarah Dashew | TEDxWakeForestU)

  • 0 0
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字