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  • Friends, Romans, countrymen. I have a dream. Four score and seven years ago, in a

  • galaxy far far away, we took one small step for man and asked not what we could

  • do for our country but whether to be or not to be.

  • (Hold for applause, smile winningly)

  • Hi there Kelsey Tonner here from Be a Better Guide coming to you live with a

  • giant pineapple. Today, we're going to be looking at getting the attention of your

  • group. Now this is something that we as tour leaders and experienced hosts need

  • to do all the time. So after over a decade of leading tours and experiences,

  • here are seven of our best strategies for getting the attention of your group.

  • One, always start with the group's attention. This is worth staying at

  • the beginning because I'm always surprised by how many tour leaders will

  • just sort of start speaking in the hopes of the rest of the group will just kind

  • of tune in but, I would recommend against doing this and always signal to your

  • group that you're beginning and, don't say anything of substance until you've

  • got everyone's attention. Why? Because your beginnings should be awesome right?

  • This should be when you hook people. When you pique their curiosity or you lay out

  • what's about to happen. We don't want people missing your great beginnings. Two,

  • only speak with full attention. Now this technique is gonna signal to your group

  • that you're only going to speak unless you have complete silence from everybody.

  • This is a fantastic strategy. It can be a little intimidating if you haven't done

  • it before but what happens is, the group begins to south enforce. So if they see

  • you up at the front patiently waiting, maybe even looking at those people who

  • are still chattering and being disruptive, other group members will

  • quiet them down and say "Hey we're starting". It's a really guest focused

  • thing to do because those people who are chatting, there's a good chance they're

  • disrupting the people next time. Three engage disruptive guests. This is a

  • fantastic way of drawing individuals or small groups who may have drifted away

  • or being a little bit disruptive. You can do it in lots of subtle ways. Maybe

  • walking over and gently placing your hand on the shoulder if somebody is

  • being disruptive while still giving your presentation. You can also do it by

  • gently calling groups out. You might say something like, "Hey girls can I have your

  • attention for a second? Yeah, I don't want you to miss this" and then going in. You

  • can also use names if you know the names of your group members, all the better

  • because people love the sound of their own name. So you can say something as

  • simple as "and Steve, I know you're gonna get a kick out of this" and just by

  • saying Steve's name, he's gonna perk right back up and tune it. Four, use the

  • silent Fox. Now there are many variations on this technique but they all involve

  • the same basic rules which is you explain to your group at the beginning

  • that if they see you holding up a particular hand gesture like this little

  • fox here, they too have to make the hand gesture holding their hand high in the

  • air and they can't speak. So basically this spreads through a

  • group and it's a way of getting their attention without having to holler and

  • yell. So in Germany, I think in schools, they use the silent fox I've heard. I've

  • been to conferences where I've seen that pinkie use. The gesture doesn't matter.

  • You just have to explain it at the beginning and you can have a little fun

  • with it too you know, getting your group to talk amongst themselves and then go

  • and see how fast they can quiet down. It's a great technique to use. Five, use

  • claps and snaps. This is another technique and works as follows in your

  • regular speaking voice. Say, "if you can hear me clap twice" and then you wait and

  • hopefully someone near you heard you will give you two claps. You then repeat

  • with a different number of claps or snaps. "If you can hear me clap three

  • times", and you keep repeating until everyone in the group is clapping or

  • snapping a lot. Now this works super effectively because one, you don't have

  • to shout or yell and two, all this clapping and snapping get the attention

  • of other folks. They're curious as to what's going on. Other great thing is you

  • don't need to explain this game at the beginning. You just use that technique

  • whenever you want and then launch directly into your content. After people

  • have done it once or twice, it becomes that much more effective. Six, leverage

  • your physical environment. A great tour leader is always thinking about physical

  • space when leading their tour. For example, is there a shady place, if it's

  • too hot for your group to be in, is there an opportunity for them to sit down, is a

  • protection from the wind, is there a quiet place if you were in a crowded

  • area where they can hear you better. This physical environment is super

  • important to pay attention to and also try and get yourself elevated any

  • opportunity you can. Are there some stairs that you can climb, can you hop up

  • and sit on a balcony allowing people to see you and hear you, is gonna be super

  • important for keeping their attention. Seven, treat attention with the respect it

  • deserves. Once you actually have the attention of an audience, don't squander

  • it treat it as sacred and don't waste it for a moment. This can happen with any

  • leader really. Once they have that group's attention, they get distracted by

  • side conversation or they ramble or they have to fish something out of their bag

  • or they're just not prepared people will learn that you're wasting their time and

  • they'll stop tuning in so, be brief, get to the point educate, entertain,

  • inspire and then give people back their freedom. In other words, treat attention

  • as a scarce commodity. To summarize, always start with the

  • group's attention, only speak with full attention, engage disruptive people, use

  • the silent Fox, use claps and snaps ,leverage your physical environment and

  • treat attention with the respect it deserves. Want some additional

  • inspiration on captivating audiences? check out our PDF below "10 incredible

  • speeches by 10 incredible speakers". This is a fantastic PDF that has 10 YouTube

  • leaks where you can go and check out these speakers in action for your own

  • inspiration. But before you do that, in the comments section below, what

  • techniques do you use to get your group's attention? Know somebody who

  • might benefit from this video. Every share like is greatly appreciated. Thanks

  • so much for being here and we'll see you next time.

  • Okay as a quick bonus, I made a short list of ways that you can get people's

  • attention that are really effective but not recommended right like taking off

  • your clothes, it's a good one, screaming at the top of your lungs, swatting

  • invisible bats, it's fun, faking a medical emergency, setting off firecrackers,

  • firing off air horns or making a sound like this "Hey, I hear the most annoying

  • sound in the world".

Friends, Romans, countrymen. I have a dream. Four score and seven years ago, in a

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如何在群體面前說話,如何吸引人們的注意力--公眾演講技巧 (How to speak in front of a group and How to get people's attention - Public Speaking Tips)

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    Robert 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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