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  • (gentle music)

  • - Hello, everyone,

  • and welcome back to English With Lucy.

  • Today, I have got lots of idioms relating to time.

  • It's a very important lesson.

  • I can't believe I haven't already covered this topic,

  • so grab a pen and paper and make sure you take notes.

  • Quickly, before we get started,

  • this video is going to help you with your speaking

  • and your listening and your reading and your writing.

  • It's gonna help with everything

  • because it's building your vocabulary,

  • but I know a lot of you want to improve

  • your listening, in particular, and your pronunciation.

  • I highly recommend listening to audiobooks

  • and reading the actual book at the same time.

  • It's like creating your own listening exercises.

  • Audible is offering one free audiobook

  • and a 30-day free trial.

  • You can sign up by clicking the link

  • in the description box.

  • Download the audiobook of your choice.

  • I've got lots of recommendations in the description box

  • for ones with British English narrators.

  • Listen to it as you multi-task

  • or you commute to work or whenever you like.

  • Or listen whilst reading the actual book.

  • That's the best thing you can do

  • for your listening and pronunciation

  • because you're hearing how the words are pronounced

  • as you are seeing them written down.

  • Just a little tip from me there.

  • Let's get on with the lesson.

  • Number one.

  • To be or not to be, that is the question.

  • No.

  • To be or not to be born yesterday.

  • If you are born yesterday, it means you are easily fooled

  • or very naive.

  • It's often used in a sarcastic, ironic way.

  • Do you think I was born yesterday?

  • Do you think I'm an idiot?

  • Or I wasn't born yesterday.

  • I'm not an idiot.

  • I don't believe you.

  • Number two.

  • Better late than never.

  • This one's kind of self-explanatory.

  • It means that doing something late

  • is better than not doing it at all,

  • but I mention it in this video

  • because it's also used in a sarcastic way.

  • I might say (scoffs) better late than never

  • if somebody is especially late.

  • Number three.

  • At the 11th hour.

  • At the 11th hour.

  • This means almost too late or at the last possible moment.

  • It's often used in business situations.

  • For example, we barely made the deadline.

  • I turned in my project at the 11th hour.

  • Number four.

  • To beat the clock.

  • To beat the clock.

  • This means to finish something before time is up

  • or before a deadline.

  • In game shows, the hosts will normally talk

  • about beating the clock, finishing the game

  • or the competition before time is up.

  • Number five.

  • It's high time.

  • It's high time means it's the right time

  • or actually past the appropriate time to do something.

  • For example, if I say it's high time we met

  • to talk about the issue, I'm trying to say

  • that it's actually past the appropriate time,

  • we should've met before,

  • and we really need to meet right now.

  • Number six.

  • I wonder if you've heard this one before

  • or if you've got an equivalent in your language.

  • Time flies, or time flies when you're having fun.

  • This means that time passes incredibly quickly.

  • And time flies when you're having fun

  • means time passes quickly when you're having a good time,

  • and that is so incredibly true.

  • Number seven.

  • Third time's a charm or third time lucky.

  • This means that the third time you do something,

  • it will usuall work.

  • It's normally said ironically

  • if you've had to repeatedly try something

  • and you've been failing each time.

  • (tongue clicks)

  • Third time's a charm.

  • Number eight.

  • In the long run.

  • In the long run means in the long term

  • or over a long period of time.

  • For example, studying English is hard,

  • but in the long run, it will be worth it.

  • Number nine.

  • In the nick of time.

  • This, like the 11th hour, means at the last possible moment,

  • at the latest possible moment.

  • For example, I made it to the bus in the nick of time.

  • I only just made it.

  • Number 10.

  • The ship has sailed.

  • This means that an opportunity has been missed.

  • I wanted to apply for the job, but the ship had sailed.

  • I missed the opportunity.

  • I ran out of time.

  • And the last one, in next to no time.

  • In next to no time.

  • And this means in almost no time at all.

  • In next to means almost,

  • so next to nothing means almost nothing.

  • Next to no time means almost no time at all.

  • For example, I arrived at the the club

  • and then next to no time, I was asked to leave.

  • (chuckles)

  • Right, that's it for today's lesson.

  • I hope you've learned something

  • and I hope you enjoyed it.

  • Don't forget to check out Audible.

  • You've got your free audiobook waiting there

  • in the description box.

  • Click on the link and sign up.

  • And don't forget to connect with me

  • on all of my social media.

  • I've got my Instagram, I've got my Facebook,

  • and I've got my Twitter.

  • And I will see you soon for another lesson.

  • (lips smack)

  • (gentle music)

(gentle music)

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A2 初級 英國腔

11個時間習語和表達方式|英語詞彙課 英式英語常用表達方式 (11 time idioms and expressions | English Vocabulary Lesson Common British English Expressions)

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    Sophie   發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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