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  • Good afternoon!

  • It's a very special afternoon, so I want to welcome distinguished guests, students, faculty,

  • and friends to this really special event.

  • The inaugural Ernest S. Kuh distinguished lecture.

  • Each year, the Kuh lecture will bring to campus an outstanding leader in the field of engineering.

  • We are delighted that Dr. Andy Grove will launch this wonderful event today.

  • I'd like to thank our student co-sponsors for helping with today's event.

  • The Berkeley chapter of the bioengineering society, and a new group on campus that was

  • chartered just this year - we are proud to welcome them, they are called "O Stem", Out

  • in Science, Technology, Mathematics to the college community.

  • And those are the guys in the engineering shirts - Here, and they should be all around.

  • I want to pay special tribute today to Ernie Kuh, the former dean of the college of engineering,

  • professor emeritus, and a trailblazer in the design of integrated circuit systems.

  • Kuh Lecture was endowed through the generosity of Ernie and his wife Patine, and they're

  • both here with us today.

  • Ernie's achievements are many.

  • His pioneering work has had a huge impact on electronics.

  • Particularly the design of IC's.

  • He was a cofounder of cadence design, transferring his research achievements to industry.

  • At Berkeley, he was teacher and mentor to some 40 PHD students.

  • As Dean of Engineering, from 1973-1980, he contributed nationally to the advancement

  • of engineering education.

  • His tenure was marked by great growth in the college - in fact, the Bechdel Engineering

  • Center where we sit today is a part of Ernie's efforts as dean.

  • Ernie is a member of the national academy of engineering, the Chinese academy of sciences,

  • and the recipient of a host of top ons.

  • In 2008, he was inducted into the silicon valley hall of fame.

  • It's an honor to be his Berkeley colleague.

  • And I might say he was dean when I was a student at Berkeley, as well.

  • Ernie, I'd like to present you with a memento to commemorate this inaugural event.

  • [applause]

  • This would normally have been my cue to say, "I'd like to join you in this case to say

  • a few words", but professor Kuh has a very, very sore throat.

  • And as a result, he has lost his voice.

  • So, I will welcome his son to the stage, and please Tim come to the stage to

  • But before I hand it off to you, come up to the stage!

  • Come on!

  • [laughter]

  • Come on!

  • Come on!

  • [laughter]

  • Before I do that, I'd like to aknowledge and thank Patine, for her many years of support

  • to the college.

  • And we are all most grateful.

  • Thank you very much Patine!

  • [applause]

  • Ernie and Patine's two sons are both alumni of Cal, and Tony is on the faculty as the

  • chair of electrical engineering and science at the University of Hawaii.

  • He can't be here, but his wife and family are here.

  • And Ted is also an alumnus from the Haas school of business, and he's here, and I think he's

  • now going to pitch in for Ernie and talk a few words.

  • Please.

  • [applause]

  • Good afternoon.

  • Well, today started with a 7am call from my mother, who unfortunately told me that my

  • father was under the weather and had totally lost his voice, so I'm a pinch hitter for

  • my father's speech.

  • I asked my mom actually to give the speech because she was, is, significantly responsible

  • for my dad's success and I have nothing to do with his success.

  • [laughter]

  • So I've made a few editorial changes - dad, I hope you don't mind.

  • [laughter]

  • Here goes.

  • Thank you Dean Shastry for your generous remarks.

  • I am truly grateful.

  • Thank you Chancellor Bourgenoe for attending.

  • Patine and I are so very happy to endow this wonderful lecture series.

  • I came to UC Berkeley in 1956 from Bel Labs.

  • I supervised many excellent PHD students.

  • Some of them are here today.

  • And I enjoyed working with faculty, staff, and campus leaders, including chancellor Elbert

  • Boucher, chancellor Michael Hayman, and chancellor Tian.

  • Meeting my wife Patine some 55 years ago has been the highlight of my life.

  • I want to also mention our two sons, Tony and Ted.

  • Tony is a professor and chair of electrical engineering at the university of Hawaii.

  • Ted is an investment banker, most recently with Citigroup, and next term he will teach

  • a finance course at Cal at the Haas school of business.

  • I owe a great debt in my career to many faculty colleges whose friendship I have greatly valued.

  • I want to mention just a few.

  • My good friend and schoolmate from Stanford, Don Peterson, brought me here from New Jersey,

  • and I have been here ever since.

  • With Charlie Dissor, my classmate from MIT, I wrote two well-received textbooks.

  • The best teacher I ever had was Ernie Gilleman of MIT, who taught me how to teach.

  • And finally, Lot Fizade, a Berkeley computer science professor whom I succeeded as chairman

  • of EECS and gave me invaluable support and advice when I served as dean.

  • I also want to say a few words about our distinguished speaker.

  • I have read Andy Grove's books, and have always been enormously impressed by his achievement

  • in science and technology.

  • His role in the invention of the microprocessor changed the world.

  • When I visited him at Intel when he was CEO, he sat in a cubicle in the middle of a huge

  • room, working side-by-side with his fellow employees.

  • Indeed, he was a pioneer in both technology and modern management.

  • I thank Andy and all of you for being here.

  • Thank you.

  • [applause]

  • Well, thank you so much everyone for coming to this lecture, and thank you Ernie for making

  • the lecture possible in the first place.

  • This new Kuh lecture expands the wonderful legacy that you've given Berkeley as dean

  • and professor, and we're deeply grateful.

  • One of the special privileges of being chancellor is that one gets to meet many remarkable people.

  • Great leaders, great spirits, big thinkers, captains of industry.

  • But it's very unusual to find all of the attributes that I just described in one single person.

  • But this case, in today's speaker, Andy Grove, we indeed have such a rare individual.

  • As everyone here knows, Andy is a true legend in the electronics industry and in the growth

  • of silicon valley.

  • Not only because of his achievements and leadership in technology and business, but because of

  • his personal dynamism and his commitment to reaching for big, new, game changing ideas.

  • I guess, Shankar, that means he was the inventor of big ideas.

  • Andy earned his PHD at Berkeley in chemical engineering in 1963.

  • Five years later, he founded INTEL corporation, with fellow Berkeley alumni Robert Noice and

  • Gordon Moore.

  • He's lead the company as it's former chairman, CEO, and president.

  • And today, he remains as senior advisor at Intel.

  • He's done pioneering work for technology, is the author of six books, and nearly single-handedly

  • shaped what today are the best practices for managing high tech enterprises.

  • He's won nearly every honor around, from election to the national academy of engineering, and

  • I have to say Andy, the following I like especially - he was selected one year as Time Magazine's

  • "Man of the Year".

  • Recently, some of you may have seen that the Wall Street Journal published an article about

  • Silicon Valley Leaders who are involved in helping undocumented young people gain access

  • to higher education and jobs.

  • Andy Grove, together with his spouse Eva, are among those admirable leaders who have

  • courageously supported educational access for undocumented youth.

  • Understanding that it is an issue important not only to sustaining equal opportunity but

  • also to the economic health competitiveness of California and US more broadly.

  • In fact, I wish we'd had you here yesterday because at the end of the day yesterday we

  • had a reception to celebrate the first scholarships that we've been able to give to our undocumented

  • students because of the path they chose, AB130, and next year, as of AB131 we'll be able to

  • provide them conventional financial aid, including cal grants, and it was probably one of the

  • most inspiring events I've been at since I became chancellor of Berkeley.

  • We though there were about 50 undocumented students, and 140 have turned up and gotten

  • financial aid.

  • These are courageous, wonderful young people.

  • At Berkeley, we are proud to call Andy a very good friend.

  • He's been a benefactor and a sound advisory to a succession of chancellors, including

  • myself and deans of engineering, including the two of them sitting there and several

  • others in the audience.

  • In recent years, he has turned his efforts to advancing medicine and patient care.

  • He's been patient advocate at UCSF and has worked to further research on prostate cancer

  • and Parkinson's disease.

  • He does great work in many areas, through the Grove Foundation, and we are proud to

  • have with us today his partners in that effort, his wife Eva, but also his daughter Karen,

  • who's a Berkeley engineering alumni.

  • [applause]

  • As you will learn today, he is passionate about shortening the time it takes to translate

  • new technology to better, affordable patient care.

  • Central to that effort, he has been a driving force in the creation of a master of transnational

  • medicine degree program, which is awarded jointly by UC Berkeley and by UC San Francisco.

  • It is my great pleasure to welcome Dr. Andy Grove.

  • [applause]

  • One more remark.

  • [applause]

  • Andy, before you begin your talk, I'd like to mark this occasion in a special way.

  • The Chancellor's Citation is given to distinguished visitors whose presence honors our campus

  • and achievements the university salutes.

  • And to celebrate your remarkable career and your long partnership with your alma mater,

  • we are delighted to award you the chancellor's citation.

  • [applause]

  • As I was listening, I wondered if you were counted among the immigrants?

  • Congratulations!

  • [applause]

  • Before I start my talk, I would like to explain the title.

  • The title is a little bit of history.

  • As the chancellor said, I have been concerned about the speed with which medical developments

  • take place and compared several occasion how we do similar things, how we increase the

  • learning process to get results faster.

  • I discovered that whenever I made these comparisons, fairly aggressive blog writers crapped on

  • my head.

  • Berkeley.

  • Mario Savio would agree.

  • The only good news about this - he was consistently complaining about microchips are not men,

  • and men are not microchips.

  • But as he kept doing this, he decided to call the possibility of comparing these two things

  • as the andigrove fallacy.

  • If you knew me well, you would know that I am green with envy every time I hear about

  • Moore's law.

  • [laughter]

  • Well, Gordon, you don't have a fallacy.

  • [laughter]

  • The problem with the speed of discovery is that

  • a small part of - it's a very serious problem.

  • Economically, it is single-handedly capable of doing major harm to the US economy, comparable

  • to a handful of wars, financially.

  • The more we drive the engine, the less it wants to move.

  • This is one of an infinite number of statistics showing that when you compare the United States

  • to advanced countries, life expectancy - there is an advantage to being in the US.

  • US medicine did do something with all the money that we spent on it, but it seemed like

  • we are driving the whole thing into separation.

  • So how do we break out of that situation where the more we spend, the best we can hope for

  • is to not make things worse.

  • Before even thinking about that question, I want to tell you about the US government's

  • part and participation in this problem is.

  • It takes the shape of two very major organizations.

  • Lots of PHD employees of longterm standing, dedicated and hardworking people - not alltogether

  • different from an academic campus.

  • The NIH is responsible for developing science for medical use, the FDA is supposed to make

  • sure that when the science becomes a drug it is safe and effective.

  • And CMS is - how many of you know what CMS is?

  • Two?

  • Four?

  • CMS is your building agency and healthcare matters.

  • Every time you get a statement Your treatment - which I will not remind you what it is - would

  • have cost you two million dollars.

  • But since we give a major discount, it only costs 20,000 dollars.

  • That is the work product of this CMS driven financial system.

  • I want to talk a little bit about each of these blocks.

  • By the way, I should say the person who writes the blogs might as well say that these are

  • my personal opinions.

  • Occasionally supported by data.

  • [laughter]

  • My data is no worse than his data.

  • My opinion is better than his.

  • [laughter]

  • The NIH is responsible for the scientific work.

  • And there's a phrase using the principle of the phrase to prioritize what gets funded

  • and what doesn't.

  • And that phrase is, "When everybody has left these medical science business, we want the

  • best science."

  • Best is hard to quantify, but at least it ought to be directionally definable.

  • It isn't.

  • It is the instruction given to groups of people to judge the merits of different proposals.

  • Best wins.

  • And if the people disagree, there's no metric.

  • Relatively few facts that set the value.

  • Consequently, there seems to be an arbitrary referendum to make decisions of the NIH which

  • over a long period of time average out.

  • But in facing any given problem, this vague instruction does not help focus.

  • The second building block I want to talk about is the FDA.

  • The food and drug administration.

  • That doesn't have anything to do with food, it has a great deal to do with drugs, and

  • it is probably one of the strengths of the US medical system we have a strong organization

  • dedicated to make sure that drugs are safe.

  • This responsibility was given to the FDA many years ago back in the 1930s.