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  • CARL AZUZ: Hi, I'm Carl Azuz.

  • And welcome to "CNN 10."

  • It's always good to see you.

  • A growing number of countries around the world

  • are grounding a popular type of passenger plane.

  • And that's the first story we're explaining.

  • On Sunday, an Ethiopian Airlines flight

  • crashed shortly after takeoff in the capital of Ethiopia.

  • All 157 people aboard were killed.

  • It happened less than six months after an incident on October

  • 29, when a Lion Air flight crashed shortly after takeoff

  • in the capital of Indonesia.

  • All 189 people aboard that flight were killed.

  • The one thing these two flights have in common

  • is that they were aboard new models of the same airplane,

  • a Boeing 737 Max 8.

  • It was introduced two years ago.

  • It's a very technologically advanced jet.

  • And it might be that technology that's causing its problems.

  • - Boeing bills its 737 Max as the fastest selling airplane

  • in the company's history.

  • A high-tech, single-aisle jet, there are more than 5,000

  • on order for 100 airlines worldwide.

  • Many of them are in China and India.

  • The 737 has a long history.

  • Since the first twin jet Baby Boeing was introduced in 1967,

  • it's grown into the best-selling line

  • of commercial jets in history.

  • The Max 8 variant, launched in 2017,

  • seats up to 200 passengers.

  • It was designed to offer airlines

  • greater range, better fuel efficiency than the models that

  • came before.

  • Like any new series, Boeing introduced brand-new technology

  • and features into the 737 series,

  • including the automatic safety system.

  • DAVID SOUCIE: This particular aircraft

  • has a new, something new, as far as how the autopilot responds.

  • When the angle of attack, when the aircraft nose

  • goes up too high, it pushes that nose down,

  • even when the autopilot is off.

  • And a lot of pilots aren't used to that.

  • - In the case of Lion Air, Indonesian investigators

  • say pilots repeatedly fought to override

  • that system before the fatal crash

  • of the plane back in October.

  • The preliminary crash report said faulty sensors

  • led the automated system to push the nose of the plane

  • down again and again.

  • It's not clear why the pilots did

  • not follow the recognized procedure

  • and turn the system off.

  • Now, this crash, the second in a brand-new model

  • plane shortly after takeoff.

  • It's provoking more questions about the plane's design

  • and what Boeing has told the airlines.

  • CARL AZUZ: The CEO of Ethiopian Airlines

  • says the pilot had flight control problems shortly

  • before the plane crashed.

  • But both accidents involving this Boeing model

  • are under investigation.

  • And there's no evidence at this point

  • that the same problem caused them.

  • Still, countries from Australia, to China, to the European Union

  • and India have grounded the 737 Max 8

  • airplanes, making it illegal for them to fly

  • in or over these nations.

  • According to the Reuters news organization,

  • Boeing says it's been developing a software update for the plane

  • that's quote, "designed to make an already

  • safe aircraft even safer."

  • The US Federal Aviation Administration also

  • said earlier this week that the aircraft is safe,

  • though it has ordered Boeing to make some design changes to it.

  • Some US senators are now saying the FAA

  • should temporarily ground it until it's proven airworthy.

  • The US and Canada are the only two

  • countries where substantial numbers of these planes

  • are still flying.

  • The United States government is trying

  • to keep American wireless companies and countries

  • around the world from buying telecommunications

  • equipment made by a Chinese company named Huawei.

  • This is the world's largest telecom manufacturer.

  • It's taken such a lead in developing

  • 5G wireless technology that many carriers can't replace it.

  • 5G is said to be many times faster and more reliable

  • than 4G.

  • China and Huawei have denied doing anything wrong.

  • But the US says Huawei has connections

  • to Chinese government intelligence

  • and that Huawei's equipment could

  • allow China to potentially spy on people who use it.

  • It's not just civilian security the US is concerned about.

  • - Hidden beneath this vast, snowy prairie land in Central

  • Montana are more than 100 nuclear-armed

  • intercontinental ballistic missiles ready for launch.

  • It's desolate terrain, but vital to American national security,

  • which experts worry could face a threat from China.

  • This fenced-in area is a missile silo controlled

  • by Malmstrom Air Force Base.

  • Right next to it, a cell tower belonging to a company

  • called Triangle Communications system.

  • It's an American company.

  • But its network uses radio transmitters and receivers made

  • by the Chinese company, Huawei, a telecom giant that

  • has been called a national security risk

  • by US intelligence officials.

  • CHRISTOPHER WRAY: We're deeply concerned about the risks

  • of allowing any company or entity that

  • is beholden to foreign governments that don't share

  • our values to gain positions of power

  • inside our telecommunications networks.

  • - Given the power of the Chinese government

  • over Chinese companies, experts say the Huawei technology

  • could be weaponized by Beijing.

  • JAMES ANDREW LEWIS: If they asked Huawei,

  • turn off the phones, tell us what people are doing,

  • scramble the data going over it, block calls,

  • make random phone calls, there's nothing we

  • could really do to stop that.

  • [BEEP]

  • - These bases use encrypted communications.

  • But valuable intelligence could be gathered on the people

  • working with the ICBMs.

  • - 2, 1, turn.

  • - And the area could also be targeted with network attacks.

  • There's no evidence that anything like this

  • has happened.

  • But CNN has identified dozens of cellphone towers equipped

  • with Huawei technology, some dispersed among the Malmstrom

  • Nuclear Missile Fields.

  • JAMES ANDREW LEWIS: ICBMs are supposed to be pretty hard.

  • That might not be easy to do.

  • But that doesn't mean our opponents

  • won't try and figure out if they can do it.

  • - Areas like this are so remote that often

  • the only cellphone service comes from small networks.

  • Unlike major carriers like Verizon and AT&T,

  • smaller companies depend on government subsidies.

  • And many buy cheaper equipment made by Chinese companies

  • like Huawei.

  • While the company is barred from US government contracts

  • and federal employees can't use their devices,

  • rural carriers have no such restrictions.

  • The companies that own these towers are part of the Rural

  • Wireless Association, who say a quarter of their members

  • buy Huawei because it's far cheaper,

  • and say it would cost up to $1 billion to replace.

  • The Pentagon would not say what kind of relationship, if any,

  • it has with these carriers.

  • But Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan

  • told CNN in a statement, they are "working closely

  • with our industrial and research partners

  • to develop comprehensive and innovative solutions

  • for both the department and commercial industries."

  • CARL AZUZ: 10-second trivia.

  • Which of these American universities

  • is the oldest, Wake Forest, Georgetown,

  • Stanford, or the University of Southern California?

  • [BEEPING]

  • The oldest university here, and the only one

  • on this list that was founded in the 1700s, is Georgetown.

  • 50 people across the United States

  • have been formally charged with cheating

  • to get students in the highly respected colleges.

  • The FBI'S criminal investigation was

  • called Operation Varsity Blues.

  • It covers crimes allegedly committed

  • between 2011 and 2019.

  • And it led to the arrests of athletic coaches, DAT and ACT

  • administrators, and dozens of parents.

  • What they're accused of doing is helping students cheat

  • on college entrance exams like the SAT and paying some sports

  • coaches to say certain students should be admitted

  • to their colleges because the students were good athletes,

  • even when they weren't.

  • In some cases, this involved creating

  • fake athletic profiles for students to make

  • them look like good athletes.

  • Prosecutors say the cheating was carried out mostly

  • without the students' knowledge, according to ABC News,

  • and that it was done to get them into schools like Yale,

  • Georgetown, Stanford, and the University of Southern

  • California, among others.

  • The interim president of USC called it "immensely

  • disappointing that school employees would allegedly abuse

  • their positions in this way."

  • A US attorney involved in the investigation

  • said, "for every student admitted through fraud,

  • an honest, genuinely talented student was rejected."

  • US officials say this was the largest

  • college cheating scam the federal government

  • has ever prosecuted.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • When you see this winterized car for the first time,

  • don't be fooled.

  • It's no Mustang.

  • It's snow Mustang.

  • A Nebraska State trooper found this and shared it

  • on social media, saying that while some people

  • make snowmen, in this part of the country,

  • they make snow cars.

  • The officer even gave it a ticket--

  • a fake one, of course--

  • for being double parked.

  • Apparently, a local businessman and his kids

  • formed this frosty Ford.

  • Forget 5.0, it's a five point snow.

  • It's a cold weather curbside car you can't tow.

  • Only where it's chilling could you

  • shape one if you're willing.

  • But there's no way to be telling when

  • your sculpture will be melted.

  • So if you're going to make one, it has to be a fake one.

  • You'd be sure to break one if you ever tried to take one.

  • It's a truly cool vehicle that no one's going to seize.

  • And maintenance is easy because it needs no anti-freeze.

  • I'm Carl Azuz on the loose for CNN.

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中新網10日電】2019年3月13日。 ([CNN 10] March 13, 2019)

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