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  • CARL AZUZ: A large chunk of the US

  • is shivering in what meteorologists

  • are calling the coldest temperatures in a generation.

  • Bundle up, because that's where we're starting

  • today's edition of "CNN 10."

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • And I'm thankful to be inside the CNN Center.

  • On Wednesday morning, about 80% of the continental US

  • saw temperatures below freezing.

  • If they all stepped outside at once,

  • more than 224 million people would have felt it.

  • And over the next couple of days,

  • temperatures are expected to stay that way

  • for most of the country.

  • In many places, it actually feels colder than what

  • thermometers say it is.

  • That's because of the wind chill,

  • the temperature combined with wind speed.

  • At International Falls, Minnesota,

  • the wind chill registered more than 60

  • degrees below 0 Fahrenheit.

  • That's less than 10 degrees away from an all-time record.

  • Wednesday night, Chicago, Illinois

  • was expected to tie its record of 27 degrees below 0.

  • That's colder than some parts of Antarctica were expected to be.

  • And experts expected that records would

  • be broken from the Midwest, to the Northeast,

  • to some parts of the South.

  • In the coldest places--

  • we're talking about you guys in Minnesota and Iowa--

  • forecasters say frostbite injuries can occur in just

  • five minutes to exposed skin.

  • The most common places that happens

  • are on the fingers, toes, ears, nose, cheeks, and chin.

  • The National Weather Service is telling

  • people where the wind chill is negative 50 to stay inside.

  • This cold snap has been linked to at least five deaths

  • this week.

  • But forecasters say it should be over by this weekend.

  • - Nearly 3/4 of the US bracing for bitter cold--

  • - I feel like I'm going into a freezer.

  • - --digging out, as life-threatening

  • low temperatures and ferocious winds grip the Midwest.

  • - It's hard to take a breath in.

  • It's affecting my lungs a little bit.

  • - Slippery roads making travel a nightmare.

  • This dash cam video capturing the treacherous driving

  • conditions in Minnesota, where police say 193 crashes

  • were reported on Tuesday.

  • The wind chill at the Benson, Minnesota airport clocking

  • in at 62 degrees below 0.

  • - It's really, really dangerous out right now.

  • - This 13 vehicle pileup in Michigan bringing the highway

  • to a standstill for hours.

  • ERIC WESTVEER: Slow down and leave space between you

  • and the vehicle in front of you and be prepared

  • for whiteout conditions.

  • - In Illinois, giant patches of ice blanketing

  • the Chicago River, residents insisting they're

  • ready for the deep freeze.

  • - Well, I'm dressed in layers, so--

  • I have two pairs of pants on.

  • - But as long as I bundle up, have a hat, have a coat,

  • I think I'll be fine.

  • - Dangerously cold air predicted to make temperatures here

  • feel like 50 below.

  • JB PRITZKER: These conditions are

  • and can be life-threatening.

  • Even short periods of exposure to this type of weather

  • can be dangerous.

  • - Winds also whipping in North Dakota,

  • where it's expected to be negative 20 degrees.

  • Across the Nation, airlines canceling thousands of flights

  • because of the deep freeze.

  • - And they were putting the de-icer on, and the de-icer

  • froze on the plane.

  • - And for Amtrak customers, all Chicago trains suspended.

  • The flames on these tracks international,

  • crews setting them on fire to keep commuter trains going.

  • The weather's so cold, the United States Postal Service

  • is suspending deliveries in multiple states

  • across the country.

  • JENNIFER GRAY: There are basically

  • three types of winter precipitation--

  • snow, freezing rain, and sleet.

  • Snow is pretty simple.

  • Basically, the temperature at all levels of the atmosphere

  • are below 32 degrees.

  • When it lands, you have the beautiful white stuff.

  • Where it gets tricky is when you have freezing rain or sleet.

  • And to understand this, you have to go high into the atmosphere.

  • Both sleet and freezing rain start as a snowflake high

  • in the atmosphere.

  • As it makes its descent, they both melt into a raindrop.

  • As it's entering the lower levels of the atmosphere,

  • sleet will refreeze into basically an ice pellet.

  • At this point, freezing rain is still just a raindrop.

  • The difference is, as it gets closer to the surface,

  • it makes contact, sleet you will be able to hear.

  • It bounces off of everything because it's

  • that little ice pellet.

  • Freezing rain, though, will freeze on contact,

  • making an icy glaze over everything--

  • the roads, the bridges, your car, even the power lines,

  • making freezing rain one of the most dangerous

  • types of winter precip.

  • But if you're going to have winter precipitation,

  • snow is what everyone hopes for, especially

  • if you're at a place like this.

  • CARL AZUZ: 10-second trivia.

  • What would you most likely find on the surface of the Moon?

  • Regolith, dark side, liquid water, or Sea of Placidity.

  • Regolith, also known as lunar soil or moon dust,

  • is all over the Moon.

  • Of course, regolith is all over the Earth too.

  • But that's not the kind the European Space

  • Agency wants to start mining.

  • It recently said it was teaming up

  • with the European aerospace company

  • to look into mining lunar soil.

  • Why?

  • Lunar regolith, like regolith on Earth,

  • has water and oxygen in it.

  • But being able to mine those elements on the Moon

  • could help support a potential base there.

  • And if scientists are also able to extract helium 3, an isotope

  • that's believed to be in lunar soil,

  • they think that could be used to develop

  • rocket fuel on the Moon.

  • All that would add up to using the Moon as a jumping

  • off point to exploring deeper into space.

  • Scientists hope to get this mission off the ground

  • by the year 2025.

  • But there are some obstacles to overcome.

  • For one thing, the rocket that would

  • carry mining equipment to the moon hasn't been built yet.

  • It's currently under development.

  • Also, the lander that would actually

  • place the equipment on the Moon still has to be made.

  • So the European Space Agency is really just taking

  • the first step here to see if mining the Moon is possible

  • and if it makes sense in terms of funding

  • and the resources it would require.

  • Still, according to fortune.com, China and India

  • are also looking into the Moon as a possible source

  • of helium 3.

  • So there could be an international competition

  • to mine the Moon taking place about

  • 240,000 miles away from it.

  • For decades, the film industry has had the technology

  • to alter pictures or sound to make something

  • that never happened looked like it really did.

  • A great example is when the movie character Forrest Gump

  • appeared to meet the real life President Lyndon Johnson.

  • But this wasn't easy to do.

  • It took a lot of time, a lot of skill, a lot of money.

  • Because of advancements in artificial intelligence,

  • though, it's getting easier and cheaper

  • to manipulate audio or video.

  • And the government and the military

  • are concerned this could be used to spread false information.

  • Here's a look at what they're doing

  • to separate fact from fiction.

  • - I seek to manipulate people's voices.

  • AARON CAWSON: It's actually quite difficult.

  • And people are very good at picking this up.

  • When it does fool people is when it's in a lot of noise.

  • You create a noisy environment where you

  • can't hear things very clearly.

  • Then it becomes difficult to tell that this is fake.

  • And that's where we really need these automatic techniques that

  • can learn to ignore the noise.

  • - You're building this technology.

  • How would you guys be able to detect it?

  • ROBERT BOLLES: For anybody that's enrolled--

  • by enrolled, we mean we've taught the machine

  • what the person looks like and what they sound

  • like-- we use voice recognition combined

  • with this face recognition.

  • - Whose woods these are.

  • ROBERT BOLLES: So in this case, it

  • shows when the face recognizer thinks it knows who this is,

  • Chris, in this case.

  • And it also shows when it thinks the voice.

  • - This is one of your colleagues, Chris?

  • ROBERT BOLLES: Yes.

  • - What if somebody sounds really like Chris?

  • ROBERT BOLLES: So I've got a case where

  • it's not far off from Chris.

  • And they tried to align the words so that it's similar.

  • - He gives his harness bells a shake to ask

  • if there is some mistake.

  • The only others--

  • ROBERT BOLLES: So it recognizes Chris's face.

  • But it recognizes somebody else's voice.

  • So it says, hey, there's an inconsistency here.

  • So here, I show a little bit more

  • about how we track the mouth to check to make sure

  • that the motions of the mouth correspond

  • to the words being spoken.

  • - His woods are lively, dark and deep,

  • but I have promises to keep.

  • ROBERT BOLLES: The line down at the bottom

  • says, there's a lot of problem with the lip sync

  • over most of the video.

  • - So what if there is a video, it's Chris's real voice,

  • but it's just been cut up to make

  • it look like he said something here that he

  • actually said previously?

  • AARON CAWSON: Yeah, so there'd be a change in lip sync.

  • There'd also be some pretty obvious artifacts

  • that, even if they aren't obvious to your ear,

  • would be obvious in the audio, that it's not just a recording.

  • It's a synthesis.

  • One of the big things that I think differentiates what we're

  • doing from a lot of others is rather than just focusing

  • on a single modality, be it imagery or video or audio,

  • we're looking at how those interact.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: At Gatwick Airport, in London, UK,

  • a new type of parking attendant is making headlines

  • for being completely robotic.

  • It's named Stan.

  • It looks a little like a miniature flatbed truck.

  • But when a car is ready to be parked or picked up,

  • Stan shows up, hoists up like a forklift,

  • and then ferries it to its space.

  • The company that makes the robot says

  • it can create up to 50% more spaces for cars,

  • apparently by parking them closer together.

  • It reportedly comes at a cost of several million dollars,

  • though.

  • So the question will be if airports can stand the fee,

  • and if travelers can stand the wait if Stan shows up va-late.

  • It could mean less parking and less tipping,

  • unless the robot starts slipping.

  • And then renters have to find a space to park themselves.

  • Can you Stan the puns on "CNN 10"?

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

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中新網10日電】2019年1月31日。 ([CNN 10] January 31, 2019)

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