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  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • CARL AZUZ: Hi, I'm Carl Azuz.

  • Welcome to "CNN 10."

  • This isn't the first time we've started the show reporting

  • on a crisis in Venezuela.

  • But it is the first time we've told you

  • that someone besides the president

  • has declared himself the acting leader of the country.

  • The South American nation has been struggling for years.

  • Though Venezuela is officially a federal presidential republic,

  • which is considered a type of democracy,

  • its executive branch has become increasingly

  • authoritarian since Hugo Chavez served

  • as president from 1999 to 2013.

  • He steered Venezuela towards socialism.

  • And his policies were continued by his hand-picked successor,

  • President Nicolas Maduro.

  • One of the government's biggest problems is its economy.

  • It's heavily dependent on oil sales, and it has crumbled.

  • Oil prices have fallen.

  • The nation's oil wealth was wasted.

  • And people have suffered.

  • Millions have moved to other countries

  • in search of basic necessities like food and medicine.

  • President Maduro was sworn in for a second term

  • earlier this month.

  • But political groups that oppose him boycotted the election

  • and said it wasn't free and fair.

  • Maduro said there is a permanent campaign of lies about him

  • and the late President Chavez and that Venezuela

  • is a real democracy with a truly democratic president.

  • But most other countries in the Americas

  • recently voted not to recognize his government.

  • And on Wednesday, the leader of Venezuela's National Assembly,

  • its legislative branch, declared himself

  • to be Venezuela's new interim or temporary president.

  • Shortly afterward, US President Donald Trump

  • said he'd officially recognize Juan Guaido

  • as Venezuela's new leader.

  • So did the leaders of several other countries

  • in the Americas.

  • President Maduro said his nation's opposition is

  • attempting a coup and announced he would end diplomatic ties

  • with the United States.

  • MAIKEL MORENO: [SPEAKING SPANISH]

  • AMARA WALKER: Venezuela's Nicolas Maduro

  • started his controversial second term in an elaborate ceremony

  • this month, promising to build socialism in the 21st century.

  • - [CHANTING IN SPANISH]

  • AMARA WALKER: For the country's opposition,

  • this moment marked an unprecedented power grab.

  • JUAN GUAIDO: [SPEAKING SPANISH]

  • INTERPRETER: Venezuela has a de facto government

  • for the first time since 1958.

  • We have a dictatorship in Venezuela.

  • It's a government which was not elected with sovereignty.

  • Maduro kidnapped the state for his own benefit.

  • AMARA WALKER: The head of the National Assembly, Juan Guaido,

  • said he would be ready to take over as president, a statement

  • that led Venezuela's pro-government Supreme Court

  • to nullify the body's power.

  • Still, the opposition appears emboldened in a fight

  • to unseat Venezuela's president.

  • - [SPEAKING SPANISH]

  • AMARA WALKER: A man claiming to be

  • a military sergeant called on Venezuelans

  • to support an uprising.

  • "People of Venezuela, we need your support,"

  • he said in a video posted to social media this week.

  • He and a group of soldiers were detained,

  • but the message of resistance spread.

  • Protests in the capital turned violent .

  • Officials using tear gas to break up the crowd.

  • Those demonstrations perhaps a preview of mass marches

  • called by the opposition, which received a ringing

  • endorsement from the US.

  • MIKE PENCE: We say to all the good people of Venezuela,

  • estamos con ustedes.

  • We are with you.

  • We stand with you.

  • And we will stay with you until democracy is restored.

  • NICOLAS MADURO: [SPEAKING SPANISH]

  • AMARA WALKER: The US vice president's message

  • receiving an angry rebuke from the Venezuelan president,

  • who said Pence was openly calling for a coup.

  • And from others in Maduro's camp incensed by America's show

  • of support to the opposition.

  • - Yankee, go home.

  • AMARA WALKER: Maduro's government

  • has long blamed the US for stoking anger inside Venezuela.

  • And for sanctions, which they claim have damaged the economy.

  • But critics point to corruption and failed

  • policies for the difficulties Venezuelans face.

  • An astronomical inflation rate.

  • Chronic shortages in food and medicine.

  • And a mass exodus since 2015 of millions looking

  • for more stable conditions.

  • The once oil rich country now in crisis.

  • Its citizens desperate for change.

  • Amara Walker, CNN.

  • CARL AZUZ: The US Senate votes Thursday

  • on two bills concerning the partial shutdown

  • of the US government.

  • The bill that's supported by Republicans

  • would provide the funding for a border wall between the US

  • and Mexico and allow some people who are in the US illegally

  • to stay for three years without the threat of being deported.

  • The bill that's supported by Democrats

  • would fund the government through February 8

  • but not include the money for the wall.

  • Both bills would end the partial government shutdown,

  • but neither is expected to get the 60 votes needed to pass.

  • Still, analysts say the Senate debates

  • could be a step toward ending the deadlock in the government.

  • It's directly affected 800,000 federal workers, who could miss

  • a second paycheck on Friday, though they will

  • be paid when the shutdown ends.

  • It's also led to doubt about the timing and location

  • of President Trump's State of the Union message,

  • which is scheduled for next Tuesday.

  • 10 second trivia.

  • Which of these leaders held power in the 14th century B.C.?

  • King David, Alexander the Great, Emperor

  • Augustus, or King Tutankhamun?

  • [BEEPING]

  • Of these leaders, King Tut is the oldest, having reigned

  • from around 1333 to 1323 B.C.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

  • About 5,000 artifacts have been recovered from King Tut's tomb

  • since it was discovered in Egypt's Valley of the Kings

  • in 1922.

  • But that tomb and everything in it

  • barely scratches the surface of the nation's ancient history.

  • So a museum appropriately titled the Grand

  • Museum gives a new home to some of Egypt's

  • most precious relics.

  • The location overlooks the pyramids of Giza,

  • not far from the capital of Cairo.

  • The preparation is meticulous.

  • IAN LEE: Restoring antiquities is painstaking work,

  • especially when it's King Tut 3,500-year-old chariots.

  • Conservationists spend months on minute details,

  • repairing and preparing the artifacts for display.

  • So here's the latest challenge.

  • And look closely.

  • Restore the Boy King's sandals.

  • Impossible, Mohamed Yousri was told.

  • It's a lost cause.

  • MOHAMED YOUSRI: So we created a new technique

  • by using some special adhesive.

  • As you saw, its condition, it was very bad.

  • And here I think it's come to life again.

  • IAN LEE: It's more than new life,

  • it's resurrecting the past.

  • An army of conservationists and archaeologists

  • at the new Grand Egyptian Museum saves them from oblivion.

  • Long overdue for a country awash with thousands of years

  • of civilization to preserve.

  • Seventeen state of the art labs specialize

  • in the neglected antiquities.

  • Grand monoliths receive facelifts.

  • Tut's bed being remade.

  • And his jewelry strung back to its former glory.

  • [SIRENS]

  • Outside, 5,000 construction workers labor around the clock.

  • A race for everyone to open the museum

  • by the end of the year Dr. Tarek Tawfik

  • oversees the more than $1 billion project.

  • TAREK TAWFIK: This will be the museum of the 21st century.

  • Which means that all means of modern technology

  • have been taken into consideration.

  • IAN LEE: Once completed, it'll be

  • the largest museum in the world devoted

  • to a single civilization.

  • - It's a gift from Middle Kingdom.

  • IAN LEE: 50,000 artifacts will guide visitors through the rise

  • and fall of ancient Egypt.

  • But the main attraction, of course,

  • will be the complete collection of King Tut's tomb,

  • with all his treasures on display.

  • TAREK TAWFIK: Tutankhamun when will be actually

  • the one who will take the visitor back in history

  • 3,500 years to show how a royal court in ancient Egypt

  • in the 18th dynasty, 3.5 thousand

  • years ago, would look like.

  • IAN LEE: As the artifacts move to their new home,

  • Egypt invests in its future by preserving its heritage

  • and showcasing the magnificence of its past.

  • Ian Lee, CNN, Cairo.

  • [ROCK MUSIC]

  • CARL AZUZ: Who would have thought that being on thin ice

  • could be so mesmerizing?

  • Yeah, it's a pun.

  • This is a lake in Norway.

  • [UNUSUAL SOUNDS]

  • And what you hear is the sound it makes when someone

  • skates on thin black ice.

  • The man who took this video says the ice

  • is two to three inches thick.

  • According to "National Geographic,"

  • black ice can be that thin and still support a skater.

  • But there is also still the risk that someone could fall in.

  • So like, don't do it.

  • Some say it's like the ice is singing.

  • Let's hope its voice doesn't crack.

  • That would change the tenor of an alto

  • wise enticing evening when haunting baritones strike

  • a chord with har-many skaters, bringing fanfare to core

  • all who lend an ear.

  • I'm Carl Az-ice for CNN.

  • [MUSIC PLAYING]

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中新網10日電】2019年1月24日。 ([CNN 10] January 24, 2019)

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