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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It`s Thursday, August 22nd.

  • And today`s edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS begins in Syria.

  • A civil war has been ranging there for nearly two and a half years.

  • This is President Bashar al-Assad.

  • He`s been Syria`s president since 2000.

  • His family has been in power since 1970.

  • In 2011, protesters started calling for a change.

  • The Syrian government responded with force,

  • and eventually rebel forces started fighting back.

  • The United Nations estimates that more than 100,000 Syrians have been killed in the war.

  • Each side has accused the other of using chemical weapons.

  • Rebels are making new claims this week about the Syrian government using these weapons.

  • Syrian officials deny that.

  • A group from the United Nations is in Syria right now trying to determine if either side is using chemical weapons.

  • U.N. officials say if they are being used, it would be a violation of international law.

  • From the Middle East we moved to Japan, with their new concerns surrounding the Fukushima nuclear power plant.

  • It`s the site of one of the world`s worst nuclear disasters.

  • Yesterday, the Japanese government was getting ready to classify a toxic water leak at Fukushima as a serious incident.

  • The plant`s owner, TEPCO has been trying to manage contaminated water at Fukushima since 2011.

  • That`s when a massive earthquake struck off the coast of Japan.

  • It triggered a tsunami, a giant ocean wave that hit Fukushima.

  • Three reactors went into meltdown.

  • Regarding the current concerns, TEPCO says it`s moved radioactive water from a leaky tank to a better one.

  • The nuclear engineer described this leak as extremely radioactive water.

  • He said it could pose a significant health risk to workers trying to clean it up.

  • But TEPCO says, the workers have protective clothing that will prevent exposure to radiation.

  • From the Golden State to the Gulf Coast with a volunteer stop in between.

  • It`s time for today`s roll call.

  • We`re going to bust it right out with the Bruins from Riverbank High in Riverbank, California.

  • Then we`re jumping over to Germantown, Tennessee, home of the Owls from Our Lady of Perpetual Help.

  • And Florida makes today`s roll call with the Wolf Pack from South Fort Myers High. Go Pack!

  • Next up today, the issue of climate change -

  • global temperatures indicate that Earth has been getting warmer in recent decades.

  • But there`s been debate about what`s causing the increase.

  • A new report says many scientists are more certain than ever that the culprit is human activity.

  • Tom Foreman examines the potential effects.

  • TOM FOREMAN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: You know about climate change, the idea that basically greenhouses gases are trapping heat from outside,

  • and you`re correct,

  • they are now well over 90 percent saying that human activity is responsible for the preponderance of this,

  • important to know, they`re saying there are other factors,

  • but the preponderance3 of it is coming as a result of humans doing this.

  • So, what is making - what is the result of all this? Rising oceans.

  • Why? Because we have warmer oceans, and those warmer oceans are causing melting ice caps,

  • and beyond that, melting of glaciers and other large ice areas in the world,

  • for example, Greenland.

  • And I want you to watch this amazing piece of animation from NASA here.

  • Tracking over the past few years what`s been happening to ice up in Greenland.

  • You see all these light blue areas around the edge there -

  • that`s where the ice has been steadily melting and retreating, in this entire country of Greenland.

  • And as you go on through the years, this is about to 2005 here, as it moves forwards,

  • you start seeing even the middle of the country here as it starts warming up,

  • and they are losing even more and more ice.

  • By the time you get through this entire animation,

  • what you see is that NASA has captured how basically this entire area has seen significant loss in ice,

  • all of which goes out into the oceans and that`s the real key here to concern about what`s that`s going to add up to in the long run.

  • We move on beyond this, if you look at Miami down here.

  • This is where Miami is right now.

  • Everglades National Park , it`s a little bit hard to see, but I want you to watch -

  • as this progresses, what they are predicting is that over the next 80 or 90 years,

  • if nothing changes, what you would see is a real encroachment.

  • Areas like this down here, where you have the Florida Keys,

  • they would basically go completely under water and a lot of areas would also be affected by much, much higher water levels.

  • And even if you go to major cities, like New York City, for example -

  • look at this. This is the island of Manhattan right here.

  • Right now this is the edge of it, and you can see, that`s where the new edge would be.

  • All of this out in here would be lost.

  • What would that include - well, the simple truth is if you had it lost all the way out there,

  • you would see things like Wall Street essentially starting to go under water,

  • you would see the Statue of Liberty, the island that supports it out here starting to go under water.

  • Does that mean it will happen?

  • No, we have a lot of time, in which people could build levees and that sort of thing to keep it back,

  • but it does mean it would become a genuine problem if this goes on unabated,

  • and that`s what this whole debate is about,

  • and now there`s an even greater agreement among all these climate scientists from around the world

  • that, in fact, humans are making some of this happen,

  • and only humans can stop it from happening worse.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: See, if you can I.D. me.

  • I was born in New York in 1984.

  • I attended Harvard University, but didn`t graduate.

  • In 2008, I was named the youngest self-made billionaire.

  • Part of my life was a focus of an award-winning movie.

  • I`m Mark Zuckerberg.

  • One of the founders of Facebook.

  • AZUZ: Mark Zuckerberg wants the entire world to have online access, not just to Facebook, to the whole Internet.

  • He says, it`s a human right.

  • Chris Cuomo talked with Zuckerberg about how he plans to make this virtual idea a new reality.

  • CHRIS CUOMO, CNN CORRESPONDENT: When you visit the Facebook campus, you get the sense that anything is possible.

  • MARK ZUCKERBERG, FOUNDER OF FACEBOOK: We want the campus to feel like a little - a little city or village.

  • CUOMO: And now, Zuckerberg wants to make the entire world like the Facebook campus in a way

  • by providing Internet access to the entire world.

  • The idea is called Internet.org.

  • It`s target - the 5 billion people around the globe without access to the net.

  • ZUCKERBERG: I mean here, we use things like Facebook to share news and I`m catching up with our friends, but there -

  • they`re going to use it to decide what kind of government they want,

  • get access to health care for the first time ever,

  • connect with family hundreds of miles away that they haven`t seen in decades.

  • Getting access to the Internet is a really big deal.

  • I think we`re going to be able to do it.

  • CUOMO: And the world "we" is the key word here.

  • Because this isn`t just about Facebook.

  • Zuckerberg has done something extraordinary to achieve the extraordinary:

  • reached out to the biggest players in social media and mobile data, a.k.a. his competitors, in part, to work together.

  • (on camera): How did those calls go?

  • ZUCKERBERG: That part varies.

  • But, I mean, in general - these are companies that we have deep relationships with,

  • and have worked with on a lot of things for a long time,

  • so this just kind of came out of all of the discussion that we had.

  • CUOMO (voice over): So, a team of the best in the business is coming together,

  • but for a test this size, uniting five times the global presence Facebook has already,

  • it`s going to take a lot more.

  • (on camera): What about the how - how do you do this? And how developed is the plan?

  • ZUCKERBERG: You know, we have a plan, a rough plan for what we think we`re going to need to do to pull it off,

  • and, of course, the plan will evolve over time,

  • and we`ll get better ideas, but,

  • you know, if you look at the trends, I mean data is becoming more available to people, right?

  • Apps are getting more efficient to run.

  • There are new business models to help more people get online.

  • CUOMO: It`s also good for Facebook and these other companies, right, because mobile access to the Internet is where your business lies, right?

  • ZUCKERBERG: You know, if we were just focused on - on making money,

  • the first billion people that we`ve connected have way more money than the rest of the next 6 billion combined.

  • It`s not fair, but - but it`s the way that it is.

  • And we just believe that everyone deserves to be connected and on the Internet.

  • AZUZ: Today, CNN STUDENT NEWS character study focuses on a basketball player named Zach Hodskins.

  • He`s high school senior in Georgia,

  • his scouting reports start with phrases like excellent shooter and plays extremely hard.

  • They don`t usually start by mentioning he was born without part of his left arm.

  • Zach likes that scouts treat him as a player, first, and mention the disability second.

  • Besides that, it`s not really something that`s gotten in his way:

  • he`s already had it toward accomplishing one of his goals:

  • the University of Florida has offered him a preferred walk-on spot for next season.

  • That means, he`d be guaranteed the place in the basketball team, though not a full scholarship.

  • ZACH HODSKINS, STUDENT ATHLETE: It means the world for me, because, you know, my whole life I worked for this opportunity and for somebody to notice me finally, it`s a great feeling.

  • AZUZ: Down the road, he`d like to be a motivational speaker,

  • he`s had a little experience with that, hearing from kids with disabilities from across the country.

  • Zach`s advice - just keep your head up, and if you feel it in your heart - just go for it,

  • and you`ll make it.

  • Protesters are usually passionate about their cause.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What do you want?

  • When do you want?

  • AZUZ: The general reaction from this flock seems to be ma-a-aoh.

  • Find some fire, fellows, no need to be sheepish.

  • It might have seemed like shear madness to organize a barnyard rally and post it on YouTube,

  • but in the end, it didn`t turn out half bad.

  • Wooln`t you say?

  • It`s time for us to hoof it, I`m Carl Azuz, have a great day.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It`s Thursday, August 22nd.

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August 22, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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