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  • CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It`s a new day and a new month.

  • Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • I`m Carl Azuz. First up today, we`re heading to Europe.

  • Greece has been dealing with severe economic problems,

  • it`s been getting financial bailouts from the European Union,

  • and the country is looking for more help right now.

  • These bailouts come with conditions, Greece has to find ways to reduce its massive debt.

  • On Sunday, Greek lawmakers agreed to cut 15,000 jobs by the end of 2014.

  • This vote and others in the past have not been popular.

  • Critics argue that the steps Greece is taking to get the bailout money are increasing unemployment without really helping the country`s economy.

  • Next today, we`re heading to the Netherlands.

  • For the first time in more than 120 years, that country has a king - King William Alexander.

  • He took over the throne on Tuesday, when his mother, the former Queen Beatrix stepped down.

  • The process called the instrument of abdication as outlined in that country`s constitution.

  • Back in January, Queen Beatrix said she thought it was time for a new generation to lead.

  • Crowds gathered outside the palace in Amsterdam for yesterday`s event,

  • it all happened on the Dutch national holiday called Queen`s Day.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Is this legit?

  • DNA stand for deoxyribonucleic acid.

  • It`s true! DNA is a code to a person`s genetic information, and it`s in nearly every sound in the human body.

  • AZUZ: DNA is like a set of biological instructions.

  • It`s what makes each species, each person unique from others.

  • And it can play a big role in criminal investigations as you might have seen on TV.

  • Investigators can use something called a DNA fingerprint to profile based on information from 13 DNA regions.

  • Experts say if it`s used in the right way, this profile can help accurately identify people.

  • Authorities in Boston told CNN they found female DNA evidence on a fragment from one of the bombs that exploded there in last month`s terrorist attack.

  • That could mean that a woman worked with the bombing suspects,

  • but investigators say the DNA could also come from any woman who touched any item used to make the bomb.

  • It can also be from a female victim.

  • Those bombs went off near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

  • The city`s police commissioner says, he`d consider using drones, unmanned aircraft to increase security and surveillance at next year`s race.

  • Laurie Segall looks at some of the different way those vehicles can be used.

  • LAURIE SEGALL, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Imagine a fleet of mini-drones working in tandem to do everything.

  • From play the James Bond theme song to act as first responders at the scene of the crime.

  • Here University of Pennsylvania GRASP Lab, they`ve developing very small unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs that will travel in fleets.

  • And like Bond himself, they are there when danger strikes.

  • PROF. VIJAY KUMAR, UNIV. OF PENNSYLVANIA GRASP LAB: Think of this as being the first responders.

  • The idea is that it gets to the scene before a human (INAUDIBLE) can.

  • SEGALL: It`s technology being built by academics that is yet to hit the market.

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: What we really want to do is make these robots really small

  • and then have them collaborate to perform tough autonomous lead that individually they cannot perform.

  • SEGALL: They`ll have sensors that talk to each other so they can work together.

  • But unlike the UAV`s used in combat, these robots are intended to go inside buildings.

  • They can map rooms and hallways.

  • KUMAR: If you look closely, that`s the window that you see at the back of the room there.

  • SEGALL: They tested the technology in Japan after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

  • KUMAR: And we were able to show how these robots can actually map the interiors of buildings.

  • SEGALL: The idea of using fleets of small UAVs in crisis situations appeals to campus security.

  • MAUREEN RUSH, UNIV. OF PENN., V.P. OF PUBLIC SAFETY: Since Columbine, every police department in the country trains officers to go in as a unit.

  • Wouldn`t it be fabulous to have a robot who could go a few feet in front of them with a camera that could project back to a command center like the one warrior.

  • And say the gunman is actually in room 210.

  • SEAGAL: The GRASP Lab spawn off a drone company, started by two recent graduates.

  • (on camera): So, who are the people that are contacting you that are interested.

  • DANIEL MELLINGER, KMEL ROBOTICS: Some are pretty obscure. People wanted to deliver pizzas or burritos or something like this.

  • SEGALL (voice over): Sounds far fetched? A Web site called Taco copter said it wanted to replace the delivery man with a drone flying tacos to San Francisco apartments.

  • It was a hoax, but the idea of something flying around in the sky collecting information raises major privacy questions.

  • KUMAR: There are a lot of other technologies that are very similar in nature that are already being deployed.

  • So, for example surveillance cameras, and I think we really have to engage in a public dialogue about the benefits of this technology and the possible misuses of this technology.

  • SEGALL: Drones for commercial use aren`t supposed to be in the skies until 2015.

  • But about 80 universities and law enforcement groups apply to the FAA for licenses n 2012.

  • And the uses for this small UAVs could have beat implications.

  • Laurie Segall, CNN Money, Philadelphia.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We`re basically making history in (ph)

  • UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This prom is integrated.

  • UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We share everything else together, why not have this one moment that means the world to us together?

  • AZUZ: Those students go to Wilcox Country High School in Georgia, and they helped plan one of these year`s proms.

  • And for decades, the school`s white students have gone to one prom, the school`s black students have gone to another prom.

  • The school isn`t involved with any of these dances. They`re organized by parents and students.

  • So, with this year`s two dances: a white prom and an integrated prom, the first one in Wilcox County history.

  • When we first reported on the story, we asked you to share your thoughts on our Facebook page.

  • Matthew said they should keep the separate proms in order to maintain tradition.

  • Jasmine said she felt like segregated proms degraded what the country has tried to become.

  • James didn`t agree with the idea of segregated proms, but he said if they are privately funded events, they should be allowed to do it.

  • And Samantha thought the idea of separate proms based on skin color was absurd.

  • Here is what some of the students from Wilcox County had to say about their first integrated prom.

  • KEVIN RAVAZZA, PROMDATE: Everybody should kind of gather and have a good time.

  • There shouldn`t just be - just one race anywhere.

  • I mean at football games, baseball games, you see, it`s integrated. It is how our prom should be.

  • ALEXIS MILLER, SENIOR WILCOX COUNTY HIGH: I think it says something for the county, you know, for the (inaudible).

  • Because it`s been so divided before and now we can all just come now and (inaudible) together. It`s really fun.

  • JAKEIVUS PETRSON, PROM DATE: That`s my first time.

  • ANNA GONI, SENIOR WILCOX COUNTY HIGH: I mean, we are both people, we are both human beings.

  • I mean, why not go to prom together. I mean (inaudible) for the color of people skin.

  • You know, why not just look at the people on the inside,

  • look at what they stand for, look at how their heart is, look at how they treat people.

  • Why we get somebody for what color they are.

  • I guess we just came together and realized, within themselves that you know, why if we do everything else together, why not do this together?

  • They realized, OK, even though my parents probably don`t stand for this, why don`t I take a stand for what I believe in?

  • AZUZ: When something comes up in the news, tornadoes, concussions, papal succession, the Masters, we run videos from the "CNN Explains" series.

  • Now, we get emails from teachers asking where they can find them.

  • Cnnstudentnews.com, head to the resources box, look for the link to the "CNN Explains" archive.

  • Try near the link where teachers can share their thought on today`s show. You`ve got opinions -we want to hear them.

  • AZUZ: You probably haven`t heard of Cameron Lyle - he was a star college athlete, but for the sports of shoved (ph) put disks and hammer, which don`t get the same coverage as football.

  • He recently did something, though, that made him one of the most important people in the stranger`s life.

  • Lyle donated his bone marrow, and to do it, he had to give up his college athletic career.

  • Bone marrow can be found in your hip and thigh bones.

  • It has stem cells in it, which can form in the other cells that fight infections or help blood clot.

  • It`s used to help cancer patients survive, but matching a patient to a donor is very difficult.

  • When Lyle was a sophomore, he put his name on the donor list.

  • There was only a small chance he`d ever get called, but senior year, he was.

  • CAMERON LYLE: When they said it was a match, they said would you like to proceed? And I said, absolutely.

  • AZUZ: For weeks after the procedure, Lyle isn`t allowed to lift more than 20 pounds over his head.

  • That`s why his college track and field base are over.

  • And he doesn`t know who got his bone marrow - by law, that information`s kept secret for a year.

  • All he knows, it`s someone who`s 28 years old, has leukemia and needs his help.

  • LYLE: I mean you can`t - judge your life against really anything. When you have an opportunity to save someone, that`s how you`ve got to go for it.

  • AZUZ: Lyle`s greatest fit made from a hospital bed.

  • AZUZ: All right. Last story today, let`s say you`re on the scuba diving trip. Suddenly, you guide says dives over back in the boat now.

  • What do you expect to see?

  • Probably not this - the divers who shot this Youtube video, got upclose and personal with a pod of killer whales.

  • 20 of them following the boat, jumping and playing around in its wake.

  • The group of animals has been spotted before, but no one remembers them getting behind the boat like this.

  • So, it looks like those divers got an exclusive scuba.

  • A pun about animals jumping out of the water - it was a podsibility.

  • It might have a little bit overreach.

  • Whale, it`s time for us to go for CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz. We`ll see you tomorrow.

  • END

CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: It`s a new day and a new month.

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May 1, 2013 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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