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  • Hey, I'm Carl Azuz with CNN's Student News.

  • Your source for current events, fun features and puzzling puns.

  • You're gonna see why in a few minutes.

  • First up, though, we're updating you on a standoff in the US state of Oregon.

  • On our January 8th show, which you can find in the archive of our website,

  • we reported on a man named Ammon Bundy

  • and a group of armed protestors who took over an unoccupied federal

  • building in rural Southeast Oregon.

  • Some of the demonstrators are still there.

  • But yesterday, eight people connected to the standoff were arrested,

  • including protest leader Ammon Bundy and four others at a traffic stop.

  • That's also where a demonstrator identified as LaVoy Finicum

  • was shot and killed. Law enforcement officials say

  • it's not clear who fired first, police or the protestors.

  • The demonstrators say Finicum had his hands in the air when he was shot.

  • A local sheriff says the death didn't have to happen

  • and he called for the occupiers of the federal building to leave.

  • The demonstrators say that's something they will not do.

  • We're moving one state to the south now.

  • In the city of Pacifica, California, there's a state of emergency and this is why.

  • It almost looks like a scale model of a dangerous cliff side.

  • Because it's real, officials have asked residents of homes

  • and apartment complexes to get out.

  • The rapid erosion of the coast has been blamed on storms caused by El Ni o.

  • The backyards of some properties have already been washed out to sea.

  • But even though city officials have labeled the properties

  • unsafe and ordered residents to leave,

  • some people say they're not going anywhere.

  • They don't think the danger is imminent.

  • It's not the first time homes in this area have been evacuated.

  • Storms have been eroding these cliffs for years.

  • Officials say relief organizations like the Red Cross

  • have been contacted to help support those who've had to abandon their homes.

  • Northeastern US is where we're starting today's call of the roll.

  • From Hancock, Maine, please welcome the Hornets.

  • Hancock Grammar School gets things going today.

  • From Bridgeport, Connecticut, we've got some presidents watching.

  • They're presiding over Warren Harding High School.

  • And from the capital of South Korea, that's Seoul,

  • please welcome our viewers from Whimoon High School.

  • Great to have you watching.

  • Ellis Island is in Upper New York Bay.

  • It's only about 27 acres in size.

  • For awhile it was used for landfill.

  • In the early 1800s, it was a fort.

  • At one point it was a detention center for people

  • suspected of supporting US enemies.

  • But it's most famous as the gateway to America.

  • For millions of immigrants from the 1890s through the 1950s,

  • Ellis Island was where they were identified,

  • recorded and given permission to enter the US.

  • Part of that process included physical exams

  • and there is a lesser known area of Ellis Island that housed the sick.

  • I go down this hallway.

  • I'm going to be going to the hospital built to restore the health

  • of people suffering from minor injuries, broken bones, goiters.

  • Even babies were born in this building.

  • These immigrants were expected to do physically demanding work.

  • And if they found that you didn't have the physique

  • or the capacity to do that kind of work, they'd possibly deport you.

  • Go down this hallway though, you're gonna go to the contagious

  • and infectious disease hospital that we're talking about.

  • Diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, whooping cough, tuberculosis, trachoma.

  • Hopefully I survive it, then I can return to the immigration process.

  • You're gonna see some barbaric treatments.

  • They would be the medical treatments of the day.

  • For the most part though, this is the first time the third- class

  • patient would ever see the inside of a hospital. Each pavilion is the same.

  • It's gonna be a very large open room, in the back,

  • where patients going to be as far from the hallway as possible.

  • There would have been 14 beds in the room,

  • each bed positioned between each of the windows.

  • There were private rooms, but if you had a private room, you likely were either psychotic,

  • or you perhaps had tuberculosis.

  • These are the isolation wards of Ellis Island.

  • The people here are gonna be suffering from serious diseases,

  • maybe multiple diseases.

  • So one of the cruel ironies of this room is the better view you have of the statue.

  • It's least likely that you're gonna survive your disease before getting to the United States.

  • This is the autopsy amphitheater,

  • it's gonna be a darkened room, this surgical lamp's gonna illuminate the autopsy space.

  • You're not gonna find too many people dying of malaria

  • in the city hospital of New York.

  • Doctors wanna come out to see an autopsy being performed on an immigrant.

  • If you worked here at Ellis Island, you likely lived here.

  • This is the staff house, very important medical officers lived here

  • with their families, feet away from people dying of diphtheria.

  • Children playing in here, enjoying Christmas.

  • 40 % of all Americans can trace an immigrant who came through Ellis Island.

  • So these stories need to be told,

  • it requires guides and volunteers to actually mine these stories

  • and then share with the people as they come here to visit Ellis Island.

  • Okay, just as an athlete dreams of pro sports or an actor dreams

  • of the big screen many of those who are in band or in a band

  • have dreams of success in the music industry.

  • And you probably know enough about it to expect

  • it's a pay your dues profession. You have to earn your success.

  • So what does that look like? CNN caught up with a group of songwriters

  • who showed us some of the challenges of making music in the streaming age.

  • This is captured by.

  • It's lunchtime at the Manhattan studios of songwriter producer team The Eleven.

  • 1: 04 PM And they're starting on a brand new song.

  • Brothers James and Matt Morales and their partner Dave Rodriguez are collaborating

  • today with singer songwriter Ginette Claudette.

  • They start with a chord progression. It's got that New York radio, Latin.

  • And then the song's core message.

  • I'm anticipating being with you, kind of vibe.

  • Got me waiting, kind of thing. Those are just the words that I'm playing with.

  • So we're just half an hour into the process and things are progressing really quickly.

  • This is not the romantic notion of songwriting that you might think,

  • the thunderbolt of inspiration that just happens.

  • These guys are under intense pressure to keep churning out music as quickly as possible.

  • There are a lot more songwriters, I would say today,

  • because the technology allows us to do that.

  • Technology makes everything so much faster and quicker, we have to expedite the process.

  • Three hours in and a song is starting to take shape.

  • The Eleven got a lucky break four years ago when a friend

  • and music manager spotted one of their tracks.

  • That lead to a publishing contract with one of the world's biggest

  • publishing companies, Sony ATV, and the work started flowing.

  • We've had with Meghan Trainor, Sean Jessie McCartney.

  • Their's though, is a rare success story.

  • Jason Blume, a 20 year veteran of the industry,

  • who's written songs for Britney Spears and the Backstreet Boys,

  • says this is the most difficult time he's ever seen for songwriters.

  • I personally have had a situation where more than a million airings

  • on YouTube earned me $ 30.

  • Streaming has not caught up in terms of the payments,

  • and it's almost impossible for songwriters to earn a living.

  • So what do songwriters do? We have to write amazing songs.

  • Good is not good enough anymore.

  • It's a message keenly felt by this group,

  • even with the extra money they earn from producing their own music.

  • Now if you write a hit record and you have 5 %

  • of a smash multi platinum selling record,

  • 5 % may not sound like a lot but the music business is a business of nickels

  • and dimes and if you make enough nickels and dimes

  • you can make a lot of money.

  • After five hours of work they have the skeleton of a new record.

  • Is it gonna be a hit? We hope so, it's hard to say, we don't get to make that call.

  • The laughter, is nervous, in an industry where profits are spread ever thinner,

  • that next big hit, means everything. CNN, New York.

  • A 14 year old from Kentucky holds the Guinness World

  • record for solving a Rubik's Cube.

  • He lined up all the colors on the three by three block in less than five seconds.

  • Well, this robot's a little faster.

  • It gets the job done in just over one second using a computer application,

  • several cameras, some stepper motors and some 3D printed robot

  • arms to position the cube.

  • Its builder say they've created a puzzle solving machine

  • worthy of a new world record.

  • If they made it more complicated, it could be a Rubik's Goldberg machine.

  • Only if you folks are gonna get that like those who can really solve a Rubik's cube.

  • It's a mental block, a square deal, a challenge measured in cubits.

  • Still, puns about it always make for a colorful conclusion

  • to CNN Student News. We hope to see you tomorrow. I'm Carl Azuz.

Hey, I'm Carl Azuz with CNN's Student News.

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January 28, 2016 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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