Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hello.

  • And welcome to Living English.

  • Last time in our drama Anne got a letter from her brother...

  • ... telling her that they doesn't want her to look for him.

  • Today Anne gets advice from a professor about what she should do.

  • Here.

  • I don't know what to do.

  • I think you should go to the police.

  • But he says I shouldn't look for him.

  • [...].

  • But a year is a long time.

  • If I were you, I'd report your brother missing.

  • Should I tell my parents about the letter?

  • Oh, your poor parents.

  • They must be so worried.

  • I think you should tell them what you know.

  • What if I can't find him?

  • Have faith.

  • I'm sure you will.

  • You know your brother.

  • You'll find him.

  • All then. [...] out.

  • Well.

  • Good luck, miss Lee.

  • But I don't want to do it.

  • Um.

  • Why don't you advertise in the newspaper?

  • Put a photograph of your brother there. Somebody might recognise him.

  • [...] that.

  • My advice is, never give up.

  • Thank you for your hope.

  • When you find your brother...

  • ... say 'hello' to him from me.

  • I will.

  • So Anne will keep looking for her brother.

  • The professor Gram told Anne some things she could do to find her brother.

  • Telling people things in this way is called giving advice...

  • ... or making suggestions.

  • Let's listen to the advice Gram gives Anne.

  • I think you should go to the police.

  • Gram makes it clear that this is his openion by saying 'I think'.

  • It's what he thinks is the best thing to do.

  • What other word that he uses that shows that he is giving advice?

  • Listen again.

  • I think you should go to the police.

  • He says 'should'.

  • We use 'should' to give advice or make suggestions.

  • Try saying 'I think you should go to the police' with him.

  • I think you should go to the police.

  • Another way of saying this is

  • I think you ought to go to the ppolice.

  • 'Ought to' has the same meaning as 'should'.

  • We use it for things we think are good or right to do.

  • What word do you use for things that are wrong to do?

  • Listen.

  • But he says I shouldn't look for him.

  • The opposite of 'should' is 'shouldn't' or 'should not'.

  • We use it to advice against doing things ...

  • ... such as 'You shouldn't smoke'.

  • We can also use 'should' in questions if we're asking for advice.

  • Listen to Anne.

  • Should I tell my parents about the letter?

  • Know that when we ask a question 'should' comes before the pronoun -- words like 'I' and 'you'.

  • When you say 'should' after a pronoun ...

  • ... such as 'I' -- 'I should tell my parents'...

  • ... it is a statement ...

  • ... saying what you think is a right thing to do.

  • When you say 'should' before 'I'...

  • ... 'Should I tell my parents?' ...

  • ... it's a question...

  • ... asking if that is the right thing to do.

  • Let's listen to Gram's answer.

  • Your poor parents,

  • ... they must be so worried.

  • I think you should tell them what you know.

  • Again Gram gives his advice in the same way.

  • I think you should.

  • Now it's your turn to give me some advice.

  • I'm hungry.

  • What should I do?

  • I think you should eat something.

  • I'm thursty.

  • What should I do?

  • I think you should drink something.

  • My hair is too long.

  • What should I do?

  • I think you should have a haircut.

  • Should Anne keep looking for her brother?

  • I think Anne should keep looking for her brother.

  • Gram suggests some ways that Anne can keep looking.

  • Listen.

  • Why don't you advertise in the newspaper?

  • Put a photograph of your brother there. Somebody might recognise him.

  • Gram says 'Why don't you?'

  • This is not a question he wants an answer to.

  • It's a way of offering a suggestion or an idea.

  • Why don't you advertise in the newspaper?

  • Say it with Gram.

  • Why don't you advertise in the newspaper?

  • Anne doesn't answer 'yes' or 'no'.

  • She just accepts the advice.

  • Listen.

  • [...].

  • Here is Michelle. Hello, Michelle.

  • Hello, Brenton.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • What should we do today?

  • Why don't we look at how to give advices?

  • What about?

  • How to look after a plant.

  • I just happened to have a plant here

  • Well, what do you need to do to keep a plant like this alive?

  • You have to water it.

  • If you don't water it, it will dye.

  • You have to.

  • That means you have no choise.

  • It's the only thing to do.

  • What's another way of saying 'have to'?

  • Must.

  • You must water the plant to keep it alive.

  • What else must you do?

  • Well.

  • You can just water it and it will live for a long time.

  • But if you want it to look healthy and keep growing you should feed it.

  • Feed it?

  • Give it a fertilizer.

  • You should give it a fertilizer like this

  • In the water.

  • Every month or so.

  • What else should you do?

  • You should put it in a bigger pot...

  • ... when it's grown a bit more.

  • That's the advice, Michelle.

  • And now let's listen to some more good advices from Gram.

  • My advice is, never give up.

  • Never give up.

  • What does that mean Brenton?

  • It means 'don't stop trying' or 'keep doing'.

  • Let's keep going with what to do with plants.

  • See if you can remember.

  • You ...

  • ... water a plant.

  • You must water a plant.

  • You could also say that you have to water a plant.

  • Yes, and you...

  • ... feed a plant.

  • You should feed a plant.

  • Sometimes you...

  • ... put it in a bigger pot.

  • You should put it in a bigger pot.

  • I just remember something.

  • What?

  • I should have watered my plants at home.

  • You don't have to water them everyday.

  • You can do it when you get home.

  • But they've shown us that you can use 'should' to talk about the past...

  • ... as well as giving advice about the future.

  • How?

  • You said 'I should have watered my plants'.

  • We say 'should have' to things that would have been good to do in the past.

  • Or like saying 'I should have stop smoking years ago'.

  • Yes.

  • We use 'should have' to say we regret something...

  • ... or we wish we had done something.

  • Like saying when you have done badly in an exam...

  • ... 'I should have studied more'.

  • Or when a costomer's going...

  • ... I should have put fuel in the car.

  • Yes.

  • And --

  • What do you say about this?

  • Someone...

  • ... watered it.

  • Someone should have watered it.

  • Now let's think about another word that sounds like 'should'.

  • See if you can hear it in this clip.

  • If I were you, I'd report your brother missing.

  • "I'd" means 'I would'.

  • He said he would report her brother missing.

  • Yes, and he also says 'if I were you'.

  • What does that mean?

  • It's a way of giving advice again.

  • He means that it's what he would do if it were his problem.

  • Listen again.

  • If I were you, I'd report your brother missing.

  • Let's practice using the phrase 'if I were you'...

  • ... about the plant.

  • You give me your advice.

  • First...

  • ... about watering the plant.

  • If I were you...

  • If I were you I would water the plant.

  • Next about feeding the plant.

  • If I were you...

  • If I were you I would feed the plant.

  • Let's say I'm sick.

  • I should go home to bed.

  • What would you say to me?

  • If I were you...

  • If I were you I would go home to bed.

  • Let's say I'm thursty.

  • I should drink some water.

  • What would you say?

  • If I were you...

  • If I were you I would drink some water.

  • 'Would' is a form of 'will'.

  • Remember that we use will for things we're going to do.

  • Yes.

  • We use 'will' for things we intend to do.

  • We use 'would' in a similar way...

  • ... but to talk about situations we wish or imagine were going to happen.

  • The professor isn't going to report her brother missing.

  • It's not something he will do.

  • It's something he imagines he would do if he was in the same situation then.

  • Now see if you can use the right word -- 'will' or 'would'.

  • I wish it...

  • ... stop raining.

  • I wish it would stop raining.

  • I... drive home later.

  • I will drive home later.

  • It...

  • ... be good to be very rich.

  • It would be good to be very rich.

  • You can also use will to reassure someone...

  • ... to make him feel better about what is going to happen.

  • Listen to Gram reassures Anne.

  • What if I can't find him?

  • Have faith.

  • I'm sure you will.

  • You know your brother.

  • You'll find him.

  • Gram uses 'will' in this way to say to Anne that he is sure...

  • ... she will find her brother.

  • Today we learned some other things to say when giving advice.

  • And how to use the words 'should' and 'would'.

  • Next time we'll find out what to say when you're giving your oppenion about something...

  • ... and the words we use to compare things.

  • Until then enjoy another look at today's episode of 'Sisters and Brothers'.

  • Bye.

  • Bye.

  • I don't know what to do.

  • I think you should go to the police.

  • But he says I shouldn't look for him.

  • Yes, [...] then.

  • But a year is a long time.

  • If I were you, I'd report your brother missing.

  • Should I tell my parents about the letter?

  • Your poor parents.

  • They must be so worried.

  • I think you should tell them what you know.

  • What if I