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  • Here to deliver your mid- week edition of CNN Student News,

  • I'm Carl Azuz, it's good to see you.

  • The two most dangerous parts of a cyclone or a hurricane are the storm surge,

  • the wall of water it washes ashore and the flooding its rains bring.

  • Some cities in Yemen are in bad spots for both threats.

  • Tropical cyclone Chapala thundered in yesterday morning.

  • It's the first tropical cyclone every recorded in the Middle Eastern country.

  • Yemen is already struggling with a civil conflict that started earlier this year

  • involving government forces and a rebel group.

  • It's also a poor nation,

  • with more than half of its population living below the poverty line.

  • Now, with the arrival of Chapala,

  • we're bringing in Jennifer Gray to explain how Yemen

  • has a natural disaster to cope with as well.

  • Carl, in the past 30 years of keeping records,

  • this part of the world has never seen anything like this.

  • In fact, at one point, this cyclone was equivalent to a category four hurricane.

  • It did make landfall as what we would call a category one.

  • So it weakened considerably, but a lot of rain is falling in this region.

  • This storm is fizzling out over Yemen,

  • but the flooding is going to be a huge concern.

  • This region only sees about three to four inches of rainfall per year.

  • A lot of areas in the United States sees more than that in a month.

  • Two to three years worth of rain is what is expected to fall

  • over the course of just a couple of days. And what's also interesting about Yemen,

  • a lot of these coastal cities are right up against mountains.

  • And so, when you get this much rainfall, we're going to see

  • the possibility of mudslides and even rock slides.

  • I want to show you the terrain on the map and you can see

  • right along the coast we have these cities in a very mountainous region.

  • We have these mountains sticking up and so when you get a lot of rainfall,

  • that rain has to go somewhere, and so it flows down the side of these mountains

  • and floods the small cities that are right there along the coast.

  • So you have all of this storm surge that's working its way in,

  • and you have all the rain that's falling in the mountains,

  • it's washing into these cities. And so,

  • that's why we've seen these incredible pictures, like you're seeing now,

  • of streets completely flooded. And roads washing away.

  • And so we're going to see a lot of damage

  • out of this area as this storm continues to push inland. Carl.

  • Thanks Jennifer. Next to Syria, a nation that's torn apart.

  • Over the four plus years of its civil war,

  • more that 250, 000 people have been killed.

  • More than ten million have been displaced or forced to flee to other countries.

  • There are several different groups including ISIS terrorists

  • fighting for control in Syria.

  • And outside nations like Russia and the U. S. are involved.

  • We get a lot of information from reporters on the ground.

  • CNN's Clarissa Ward has traveled into Syria and met up with Kurdish fighters.

  • The Kurds are an ethic group,

  • and the Peshmerga and the YPG are two Kurdish forces

  • that are fighting ISIS in the Middle East.

  • Our journey into Syria began on the banks of the Tigris River

  • that separates the Iraqi Kurds from the Syrian Kurds.

  • So we're here in Iraq, and Syria is just over there across the water.

  • But this entire area is controlled by Kurdish forces.

  • Now we need to get all of our gear onto one of these boats to get over to Syria.

  • Families weighed down with belongings cross in both directions.

  • It was a very short ride, and then, with a bump, We were in Syria.

  • So we've now arrived in Syria or Rojava as the Kurdish people

  • who live in this area call this region.

  • And we're now making our way along the Turkish border,

  • driving through the countryside on some pretty bumpy roads

  • to meet up with our guides from the YPJ.

  • These rickety minibuses are how most Syrian Kurds get around.

  • Listening to patriotic songs cheering on the Kurdish YPG fighters.

  • We were accompanied by a female fighter who was just 18 years old.

  • The Kurdish parts of Syria have a very different feel than the rest of the country.

  • Many women here are uncovered,

  • and the security situation is relatively calm in towns along the Turkish border.

  • But the famous Syrian hospitality is very much in evidence here.

  • Even when we visited fighters on the front lines,

  • we were invited to share their lunch.

  • On this day goat and bread was on the menu, you simply can't refuse.

  • It's fine. The highlight though was a impromptu dance

  • performance by our host as we prepared to leave.

  • Months of heavy fighting has not quashed their spirit.

  • The days are long, hot and very dusty

  • and you're never quite sure were you're going to end up.

  • Since we've been in Syria we've been sleeping in a different place every night.

  • But this is our accommodation for the night. You can see the team here.

  • Everyone's getting ready for bed and it's certainly not luxurious,

  • but you don't have hotels, really, in this area.

  • We've been relying on the kindness of strangers,

  • and every night people have been opening up their homes to us.

  • So, we're very grateful and honestly,

  • when you're in Syria Anywhere with a roof over your head

  • and a nice mattress is perfectly comfortable for us.

  • A special administrative region of China leaves todays call of the roll.

  • We're taking you to Macao, specifically The island of Taipa.

  • Thanks for watching and for your request,

  • from the International School of Macao.

  • Next, we're trucking on along to the city of Clintonville, Wisconsin.

  • Hello, Clintonville Middle School, home of the truckers.

  • Silverwolves are another unusual and awesome mascots.

  • Fremont High School in Anton, Utah is wrapping up our roll.

  • Roughly 90 % of vehicle crashes in the US

  • are at least partly because of human error.

  • A solution could involve driverless cars,

  • but there are a number of about them.

  • What if their complicated computer systems get hacked?

  • What if heavy rain or snow disrupts the car's sensors?

  • What if people become too reliant on the technology

  • and lose the skills to take over and drive themselves?

  • Plus, there's the cost. Current models of driver- less cars

  • run more than a hundred thousand dollars.

  • Still, if people adopt them and if everything works well, lets see.

  • Automated control engaging.

  • Feet off, hands off, eyes off. That's how we drove.

  • 65 miles per hour down a stretch of Virginia highway.

  • It's the state's first try at testing driverless vehicles on real roads.

  • CNN in one test car and the head of the National HIghway Safety Administration in another.

  • Virginia Tech researches in the driver's seat just in case.

  • Right here I'm going to transition over to automated mode.

  • Researchers are studying how people in driverless cars react to anything.

  • From another car suddenly stopping,

  • to a construction worker in the road.

  • All to help design the safest vehicle possible.

  • The vehicle is controlling our speed and our lane position.

  • And monitoring the environment ahead.

  • The test car receives wireless signals from other vehicles in the test.

  • When the motorcycle brakes,

  • your foot is not on the pedal.

  • I'm not on the pedal, so he has a braking event and.

  • Avoid collision. Here we're gonna have a construction worker

  • that was hidden behind that truck, but he's wearing a vest

  • That has the same technology and he's communicating his position to

  • us as well, and so when the vehicle detected a possible collision path,

  • our vehicle automatically breaks to a stop.

  • This is the future of driving. Virginia joins California,

  • Nevada, Florida, Michigan and Washington D. C.

  • in okaying self- driving car testing on public roads.

  • You're saying it's so cool because we're on a real road.

  • I mean how crucial is that in moving forward to this next step?

  • We saw a trooper coming up behind us.

  • We saw a workmen come out from behind a truck

  • All responded beautifully by the automation and the connective elements that were there.

  • At some point though, it's gonna get even more complicated out there.

  • It's a critical element of seeing all this move forward.

  • Forward to the day when no hands, no feet,

  • no eyes is the mantra for all drivers on the road.

  • You probably think the tallest dog in the world is a great dane

  • and you'd probably be right.

  • This is Bentley and he's almost as big as one.

  • 38 inches tall from paw to shoulder,

  • 228 pounds and the five year old beast eats more than half his weight

  • in food every month, about 120 pounds of that.

  • But it's not just a big food bill.

  • His owners are trying to get him certified with a big record,

  • to get his world record for tallest living dog,

  • and if they don't get it, it will be a dog gone shame.

  • Given it's a sizeable challenge, a great feat to obtain

  • and though they will have leave the decision in the paws of the judges,

  • he's certainly not an underdog. I'm Carl Azuz and we'll be bark tomorrow.

Here to deliver your mid- week edition of CNN Student News,

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November 4, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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