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  • Thank you for starting off your week with CNN Student News, I'm Carl Azuz.

  • First up, international aviation officials are trying to figure out

  • what caused a tragic plane crash in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula.

  • Kogalymavia Flight 9268 crashed on Saturday morning

  • killing all 224 people aboard.

  • It was traveling from the Egyptian resort city of Sharm el- Sheikh

  • to the Russian city of St. Petersburg.

  • Many of those aboard were Russians coming home from vacation.

  • Russian President Vladimir Putin declared yesterday

  • a national day of mourning.

  • The plane went down in clear weather a little more than 20 minutes after take off.

  • A Russian official reportedly said it broke up in mid- air.

  • The area where it crashed is home to Islamic militant fighters

  • who are associated with ISIS terrorists.

  • But though they made a statement that appeared to claim responsibility.

  • Russian and Egyptian officials say that's unlikely.

  • Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el- Sisi says the investigation could take months.

  • Moving to the Middle Eastern nation of Syria now,

  • where the US is escalating its fight against the ISIS terrorist group.

  • President Obama announced Friday that a small number of American troops

  • would be deployed to northern Syria to help different groups there battle ISIS.

  • He authorized fewer than 50 special operations forces to go.

  • But a US official says more could be sent later on.

  • The White House believes that the additional US troops

  • will be effective in helping weaken ISIS.

  • But its a significant change in plan for the Obama administration

  • which said last year that no US troops would be involved in direct combat with ISIS.

  • Democrats and Republicans are calling for the President

  • to lay out a clear strategy for dealing with the terrorists.

  • Some are concerned about mission creep,

  • when an initial military goal gradually expands.

  • As part of its ongoing air campaign in Syria,

  • the US military has used drones, unmanned aircraft,

  • for both surveillance and attack missions.

  • At the consumer level, they've given users birds' eye views of, well, anything.

  • Once again, they're expected to be a popular Christmas gift this year.

  • Something that retailers, and the Federal Aviation Administration, are watching.

  • They've reached some of the most secure air space in the United States,

  • including the White House.

  • And they've nearly collided with commercial planes,

  • even medical choppers in route to emergencies.

  • Tower, Medivac H1. We almost got hit by a drone.

  • Just to let you know up here.

  • In most cases authorities get the drone but not the operator.

  • Federal safety regulators hope that's about to change.

  • We're gonna require operators of drones to register their aircraft.

  • The FAA hopes to force consumers to provide personal information

  • when they buy a drone, so it can be tracked back to the owner.

  • I think many, if not most, users will comply

  • because there are penalties associated with using these devices

  • in the national airspace without complying with the registration requirement.

  • The FAA says this year pilots report around 100 drone sightings

  • every month with nearly 1000 drone sightings so far this year

  • the number of reports has nearly quadrupled since 2014.

  • But key questions remain about what personal information consumers

  • will have to provide and how regulators will enforce this.

  • Renee Marsh CNN Washington.

  • Today's roll call begins in West Africa.

  • We're taking you to the nation of Senegal in the capital city of Dakar.

  • We're happy to be part of your day at the International School of Dakar.

  • Thank you for watching.

  • Next we're headed to the city of Osceola in southern Iowa.

  • Hello to the Indians. Clark High School is on the roll

  • and finally the Eastern Missouri we're visiting the city of Ellisville

  • and shouting out the Trojans of Crestview Middle School.

  • Great to see you.

  • Starting later this month the French government

  • is planning to host its largest conference ever.

  • 40, 000 delegates representing 195 countries including China, India, and the U. S ,.

  • Those three nations produce the largest amounts of carbon dioxide,

  • which most scientists say is causing Earth's average temperatures to heat up.

  • A smaller group disagrees, saying climate change happens naturally

  • and the Earth can absorb the CO2 from human activities.

  • But that won't be the focus of COP21.

  • So, you may have seen this term COP21 popping up in your Twitter feed.

  • COP21 means the Conference of Parties.

  • It's the 21st time, essentially, that the world has come together

  • to try to figure out a solution to climate change.

  • This is something that we've never succeeded at before,

  • but there's very good reason to think that this year, in December,

  • In Paris, when the world meets again, it will be able to figure out

  • something that will get us on the right track.

  • When all these world leaders get together in Paris,

  • they're basically going to be talking about one number

  • and that number is 2 degrees celsius.

  • That's the threshold for warming.

  • It's measured since the start of the industrial revolution

  • and if we cross that mark we're expected to go into

  • what policy once considered the danger zone,

  • or dangerous territory for climate change.

  • There are entire countries that could disappear

  • because of sea level rise at that mark.

  • Wildfires are expected to get bigger. Droughts will get more severe.

  • And 30 % of animals will be put at risk for extinction.

  • I've seen these talks described as basically a potluck dinner.

  • And each country in the world is bringing its dish,

  • its climate plan to the table and saying, okay here's what my plan is,

  • what are you bringing?

  • And the fact that the US and China are both bringing dishes

  • to this giant international potluck is a huge deal for the Paris climate talks.

  • That really hasn't happened before.

  • China and the US are the two biggest climate polluters in the world.

  • And previously they've sort of stalled or gave mixed messages

  • in terms of what they were gonna do to get off of fossil fuels.

  • There are huge stakes at these talks but as far as what's gonna be happening

  • in Paris it may be a lot of really kind of smaller things.

  • Countries will be fighting about how aggressive these cuts to fossil fuels are.

  • Exactly who's gonna pay for countries to adapt to climate change.

  • How often these goals are gonna be reviewed going forward.

  • In the US doctors perform almost a million bone graft surgeries every year.

  • Most of the time they harvest a piece of bone

  • from a patient or a deceased donor,

  • set it where it needs to go and hope it takes hold.

  • But what if there were a way to regenerate bone from someone's own cells?

  • The 206 bones that make up our skeletons give our body strength and structure.

  • There are no extra pieces.

  • That may be why bone is the most transplanted body part.

  • Worldwide, millions of bone transplant procedures

  • are conducted each year costing billions

  • and it doesn't always work.

  • Quite literally, the only way to get human bone, even now, is to cut it out of a human.

  • What we proposed is to, say, take the best thing, which is your own bone.

  • But instead of cutting you apart to get it, is to grow your own bone in the lab.

  • In very simple terms, you'll need a 3D printer,

  • some fat, a cow bone and an incubator.

  • A CT scan gets the measurements of a patient's bone.

  • A mold is made from a cow bone stripped of all DNA

  • and then a custom made petri dish, called a bioreactor, is 3D printed.

  • The lab extracts stem cells from a patient's fat

  • and turns them into bone cells, which are put on the mold

  • and plugged into the bioreactor.

  • Patients suffering from cancer,

  • trauma or congenital defects won't need to worry about

  • transplanted bones getting infected or bodies rejecting them.

  • Because the bones would be derived from their own selves.

  • So far, they've only tested the transplants in pigs.

  • But if they can start human clinical trials,

  • Tanden says they're just eight years from market.

  • At what point then would you implant this bone into a human?

  • We're hoping to be able to start clinical trials in the next couple years.

  • Will we ever see a day where you can grow an entire limb?

  • That's a very exciting day.

  • A lot of people will have to work together to make that happen

  • because you'd have to grow muscle, skin, nerve, bone.

  • Growing limbs may be far off, but bones are where it all begins.

  • It's really interesting to be seeing it happening in front of our very eyes right now.

  • Forget carving pumpkins, pumpkin seeds, or pumpkin pie.

  • In Chagrin Falls, Ohio, high school students have a Halloween tradition

  • of rolling them. First they haul more than 200 pumpkins

  • to the top of a large hill. Then they smash and roll them down the hill.

  • Finally, the real fun begins.

  • The pumpkin pieces are slippery,

  • so the spirited students swiftly slide on sleds,

  • giving in to gravity and gourd hearted fun.

  • Before we hit the road, jack o'lantern, a question stems from all this.

  • Who cleans it up?

  • A front end loader scoops up the scraps and does a vine job.

  • And the students scrape together their own money to cover

  • the expense and plant the seeds of goodwill.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN Student News.

Thank you for starting off your week with CNN Student News, I'm Carl Azuz.

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November 2, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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