Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • From the CNN Center in Atlanta, Georgia, I'm Carl Azuz,

  • delivering ten minutes of international current events.

  • First up, trouble at sea.

  • Yesterday morning an American Navy warship

  • named the USS Lawson sailed within 12 miles

  • of an artificial island in the South China Sea.

  • Here's why that's significant.

  • Maritime law allows countries to claim the waters

  • within 12 miles of their shores as their own.

  • So, if you've got your own island,

  • you're territorial waters could stretch for 12 miles around it.

  • Last year, China started building a number of artificial islands

  • about 600 miles from it's mainland coastline.

  • It says the waters near one of these island

  • where the US destroyers sailed are Chinese territory

  • and the US broke the law by sailing so closely to it.

  • The US says it did nothing wrong because,

  • like other neighboring countries,

  • it does not accept that these manmade islands are part of China.

  • Now, this area, the spread Islands, has been in dispute for quite sometime.

  • China claims that it has long standing claims

  • to this territory and that's why they have no regrets for going in there,

  • building up these artificial islands, even putting in an airstrip,

  • raising a lot of concerns in the region that China

  • is trying to militarize these islands

  • Take control and change the whole geopolitical structure

  • of the Asia- Pacific region.

  • There's also a territorial dispute brewing in the East China Sea, this Islands.

  • That's between the Chinese government and the Japanese government

  • and both of these flashpoints have really been a major source

  • of concern for the United States, which, of course,

  • is bound by treaty to protect Japan.

  • They have a lot of military resources in this area

  • and they are patrolling to try to maintain the situation as they see fit.

  • So, the US says they're going to continue

  • what they call freedom of navigation patrols where

  • they're putting their warships close to these artificial islands

  • that China says are their sovereign territory.

  • The Chinese government very strongly opposing these actions,

  • saying what the United States States is doing is illegal.

  • The US says they're acting within the boundaries of international law

  • because they don't recognize China's claim to these territories.

  • How both governments handle this in the coming months will be critical.

  • Will the situation escalate,

  • or will they be able to work out some sort of compromise?

  • Will Ripley, CNN, Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan.

  • Another maritime issue reportedly concerning American officials

  • involves a U. S. rival and a network of underwater cables

  • that helps the world communicate.

  • Every continent but Antarctica is connected not through the air,

  • but through a tremendous system of fiber optic cables.

  • Since the 1800's ships have been laying them across the sea bed.

  • Todays cables carry email, videos,

  • business and military communications world wide.

  • They're accidentally cut from time to time

  • by natural disasters or ships anchors,

  • but it's usually an area where they can be easily repaired.

  • What if a country were to cut them intentionally

  • and sabotage international communications?

  • A new report from the New York TImes

  • cites more than a dozen unnamed US officials

  • raising concerns Russian submarines and spy ships

  • are aggressively patrolling near important undersea cables.

  • NASA fiber- optic lines spanning from continent to continent

  • carrying the bulk of the world's internet communications.

  • The goals are to humiliate the United States

  • and show that it can't defend itself and to project Naval power into the Atlantic,

  • thus showing the United States and Europe, we're here.

  • You have to deal with us and take us seriously,

  • and we can propose a threat to your most vital interests.

  • According to the Times,

  • officials are concerned that if a larger conflict

  • between Russia and the West broke out,

  • a Russian ship could locate an internet cable on the sea floor,

  • lower a submersible down to it,

  • And either attach a wire tap to eavesdrop on it, or worse,

  • sever the cable, cutting off a crucial data pipeline.

  • They're extremely vital.

  • They're the core of our communications infrastructure.

  • So we hear a lot of talk about the cloud, for example.

  • And we think of it as something nebulous, something in the sky.

  • Well, the cloud is really Under the ocean.

  • Jonathan Yambo works with a company which monitors telecom infrastructure.

  • He says there are hundreds of these cables stretching across the ocean floors.

  • Enough, he says, to span the globe at the equator 15 times.

  • Yambo says if multiple undersea cables were cut at once,

  • it could harm American business and government interests

  • and could have even more catastrophic effects on Europe.

  • The Pentagon won't confirm the concerns raised in the New York Times.

  • One official says while the Russians could tamper with the cables,

  • the U. S. hasn't seen a significant increase in Russian activity

  • where the cables are located.

  • There's also been no evidence of any actual cable cutting

  • but newspaper reports say the Russian ship, the Yentar,

  • which is equipped with submersibles capable of cutting undersea cable

  • Has been spotted cruising in the Atlantic on its way to Cuba,

  • not far from where at least one cable is located.

  • No U. S. agency would comment for the record on

  • the concerns raised in the New York Times report.

  • A Pentagon spokesman said it would be a concern

  • if any country was tampering with America's Internet cables.

  • The Russians meanwhile are pushing back hard,

  • a Foreign Ministry spokeswoman saying the media

  • has been whipping up hysteria lately trying to make Russia look like the aggressor.

  • Those reports, she says, are not based on facts, but on assumptions.

  • Ryan Todd, CNN, Washington.

  • U. S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt,

  • famously said the only thing we have to fear is fear itself.

  • There's a phobia for that. Now you might be familiar with arachnophobia,

  • the fear of spiders, or acrophobia, the fear of heights

  • but if you fear fear, you're afraid of developing any kind of phobia,

  • you may just phobiphobia and you may just want to stay home this Halloween.

  • And that's random.

  • Okay now, for years US retail companies

  • have looked forward to Black Friday

  • like many Americans look forward to turkey the day beforehand.

  • The Friday after Thanksgiving is traditionally

  • one of the busiest shopping days of the year.

  • It's called Black Friday because in business, to be in the black, is to be profitable.

  • Companies usually sell a lot of merchandise,

  • offering deep discounts to encourage people to shop.

  • In recent years, stores have opened earlier and earlier.

  • Some in the middle of the night.

  • Some on the afternoon of Thanksgiving

  • but at least one US retailer has a different strategy this year.

  • It's not opening at all.

  • What is this all about? I think for us, Black Friday was

  • kind of one of those iconic days that has come to mean more about shopping.

  • So the idea of being out, up on a mountain

  • and maybe find some snow Is pretty awesome.

  • Jerry Stritzke is the CEO of REI.

  • The outdoor retailer is the first to close it's doors.

  • Not just on Thanksgiving, but on Black Friday as well.

  • So how can REI close on one of the largest shopping days of the year?

  • Well, the answer lies in its corporate structure.

  • You're in a position to do something different.

  • You don't have to report to shareholders, right?

  • We're a 76 year old co- op that was really founded

  • by people who love the outdoors and that's at the center of our business.

  • It is a member- driven organization.

  • 5. 5 million members to be exact,

  • the largest consumer co- op in the country.

  • Another reason? Many experts say Black Friday isn't what it used to be.

  • The National Retail Federation reported that sales on that day dropped 11 % last year,

  • and most holiday sales have moved online, where REI is still open for business.

  • Can people still buy stuff online?

  • We're doing a cover screen that basically encourages people to opt outside.

  • We'll go to a skeleton staff,

  • but the site will be operating once you get beyond

  • that blackout screen and we actually think as that holiday season's here,

  • that's an incredibly important time to be outside.

  • So I think the message will resonate even more,

  • both with our employees and our members.

  • That message is great for employees But the company could benefit as well.

  • How valuable is this message to REI?

  • It's a form of free advertising right?

  • I would probably say it a little differently.

  • When you close business on one of the busiest days of the year

  • it's gonna cost you money.

  • The value to us is that we have a very passionate perspective

  • about the need and the power of getting outside.

  • If you'd like a mention on our roll call

  • please head to www. cnnstudentnews. com.

  • It is the only place we look for your requests.

  • Antilles High School is first up this Wednesday,

  • hello to our viewers in Fort Buchanan, it's in Puerto Rico.

  • From the town of Coventry, Rhode Island,

  • the falcons are aloft. Feinstein Middle School is on the roll.

  • And moving south, down the east coast, to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina,

  • it's great to see the panthers of Carolina Forest High School.

  • Earlier we mentioned acrophobia.

  • This is not a sport for those who have it.

  • It's also probably not a sport for people who value safety.

  • Wing suits let skydivers spend more time in free fall.

  • This event was a wing suit race.

  • It started 8000 feet up in a helicopter

  • and required flyers to pass through gates that were floating in the air.

  • Out of forty racers, yes, there are at least forty wing suit racers,

  • an American daredevil had the fastest time.

  • So, he suited up for the wing, which some would say was pretty fly.

  • The sport might not fly with anyone who's down to Earth,

  • but if the pursuit of a suit that's suitable for flying

  • really suits you wing suit yourself and flying on the wing follow suit

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN Student News.

From the CNN Center in Atlanta, Georgia, I'm Carl Azuz,

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級 美國腔

October 28, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

  • 5548 68
    VoiceTube 發佈於 2015 年 10 月 28 日
影片單字