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  • Fridays are awesome. Hope yours is going well so far

  • as we start our ten minute tour of international events.

  • US Special Forces recently participated in

  • a dangerous overnight mission in Iraq.

  • The Pentagon says the ISIS terrorist group

  • was about to execute dozens of hostages at a prison in Northern Iraq.

  • US troops, along with Iraqi forces and others from the region

  • stormed the prison before dawn yesterday.

  • American officials say 70 hostages were rescued.

  • They included civilians, Iraqi troops,

  • and some members of the ISIS terrorist group

  • that had been accused of spying.

  • More than 20 ISIS fighters were killed in the raid,

  • and one American service member was killed.

  • US officials say that it was the first time

  • that an American died in ground combat with ISIS.

  • In 2014, President Obama had pledged that no US troops

  • would be involved in ISIS ground combat,

  • but he later said that Special Operations Forces

  • could play a role in certain missions. In Washington DC,

  • former US Secretary of State and current Democratic presidential candidate

  • Hillary Clinton testified on Capitol Hill yesterday.

  • A congressional panel was questioning Clinton about her decisions as Secretary,

  • when a US compound in Benghazi,

  • Libya was attacked on September 11th, 2012.

  • Four Americans were killed.

  • Several investigations and hearings involving Clinton

  • have been held since then.

  • Republicans on the panel say there are still serious questions

  • for her to answer about what happened.

  • Democrats say the investigations and hearings

  • are Republican attempts to hurt Clinton's presidential ambitions.

  • There's a lot of talk these days about startups springing up in Silicon Valley,

  • and New York, and everywhere in between.

  • But before a startup can get started it needs money.

  • That's where venture capital, or VC comes in.

  • So what is it? Venture capital is a high risk investment.

  • A brave investor looking for a big profit gives money to a cash hungry,

  • young company in exchange for a piece of that business.

  • Their plan? Sell that stake at a huge profit

  • once the company starts making money.

  • Now, that might not sound much different than investing in stocks,

  • which are tiny pieces of huge companies. But here's the main difference.

  • Unless something goes really, really wrong, stocks rarely drop to zero.

  • But that happens all the time in venture capital.

  • According to one study from Harvard,

  • three out of four venture capital bets don't return any money to investors.

  • Venture capitalists know those odds.

  • They expect the fourth winning bet to pay off big time.

  • Enough to make up for the first three that went nowhere.

  • So venture capitalists have to have a high appetite for risk,

  • and a lot of patience.

  • You often hear about them when they strike gold,

  • like early backers of Facebook and Twitter.

  • But those are the exceptions.

  • And in the end, the promise of finding the next Facebook

  • is just too tempting to pass up.

  • It looks like 2015 could be the biggest year for venture capital

  • investments since 2000.

  • So far this fiscal year investors have put up more than

  • $ 47 billion for startup companies.

  • The last time so much money was invested was during the dot com bubble,

  • which sought immense funding, some of it reckless,

  • for new Internet related companies.

  • For many of them the bubble burst in 2000 and businesses failed.

  • But others, like Amazon. com,

  • survived and became immensely profitable.

  • What are venture capitalists investing in now? A lot of technology,

  • health care, and media companies.

  • But the companies that are getting investments are fewer

  • and farther between than in previous years.

  • And many of them have been in business for a little while already.

  • That could indicate that investors are being more cautious

  • with their money than they were during the dot com boom.

  • Today's roll call is brought to you by Thursday's transcript page at CNNstudentnews. com.

  • First up, from Grand Junction, Colorado, welcome the Wolverines.

  • They're watching from West Middle School.

  • In this corner, from Floyd, Virginia, the Buffaloes are stampeding in.

  • Hello Floyd County High School.

  • And all the way from southwest Germany,

  • we've got the Wolves today from Patch Middle School in the city of Stuttgart.

  • Time for the Shoutout.

  • A person with protanpiahas has a form of what condition?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Is it A, color blindness, B, nutritional imbalance, C, nearsightedness, or D, stress?

  • You've got three seconds. Go!

  • People with protanopiahas, a form of color blindness,

  • often have trouble distinguishing between shades of red And green.

  • That's your answer, and that's your shout out.

  • Color blindness is also known as color vision deficiency.

  • It's usually inherited, and it's more common among men then women.

  • People with the condition perceive colors differently

  • then those who don't have it.

  • There's no cure for color blindness,

  • but there are some computer applications

  • that help people distinguish between different colors,

  • and there are lenses available that are sometimes effective

  • if they're used in bright light.

  • If I make a steak, I'll bring it in thinking it's totally done, and it will be really rare.

  • I just can't see that it's red. It's probably unhealthy.

  • So I'm out with a couple of CNN producers

  • who also happen to be color blind,

  • and these glasses are supposed to help with that.

  • Okay, I think these kinda work.

  • Let me explain color blindness,

  • because it doesn't mean that you see the world in black and white.

  • It means that some colors may seem a little duller

  • and others may just blend together.

  • And it's not as rare as you might think,

  • it affects between eight and 12 % of men and up to 1 % of women in the US.

  • I definitely see more shades.

  • Like that tree that looks kind of yellow looks actually more orange.

  • That one back there? Yeah that one back there.

  • According to their online tests,

  • Jack's eyes absorb too much green light.

  • He's always struggled with the difference between blue and purple.

  • Does it look any different to you?

  • Things look, I think a little more vivid.

  • Like, I turn the saturation up on the TV almost.

  • Wendy's eyes on the other hand, don't absorb enough green light.

  • Before, could you see the difference

  • between the trunks and the trees, the leaves?

  • No, and now I can. Now you can see that? Yeah. That's amazing.

  • They're both forms of what's known as red green color blindness.

  • The thing is though, it's kind of a misnomer.

  • Seeing too much or too little green changes the way you see other colors.

  • Purple and blue, for example, can start to blend together.

  • What color are those flowers behind us now? Those look purple.

  • They're purple. Yeah. Now take them off, what color do they look like?

  • They look blue. The glasses work by shielding your eyes

  • from the part of the spectrum where red and green overlap the most.

  • Granted, this is a blue purple, but it's definitely purple.

  • I think it's a little more purple with them on.

  • I wouldn't say it's a big thing.

  • The world looks significantly different to me.

  • Do you like it better?

  • Yes. Bottom line, they worked pretty well for Wendy,

  • not as great for Jack, but I can tell you from personal experience,

  • I saw the world in a whole new light.

  • We've all been there, you get to the edge of the diving board

  • and you're just not sure yet you wanna take the plunge.

  • This penguin? He's in the same boat.

  • He gets up to the edge and then, nope.

  • I'll waddle back on over here for a while.

  • Then he tries again. Just about, nope, not gonna do it.

  • He'd be a lot more graceful in the water if he'd just get in,

  • but there's something unseen working against him.

  • It's called gravity, and it eventually wins.

  • Beforehand, he kind of looked like a fish out of water.

  • People were asking, waddle he do about this?

  • They probably expected him to flip out, and he he was like look,

  • it's flightless not frightless,

  • and maybe I just don't want to get bird by swimming in my tuxedo.

  • I'm Carl Azuz, and that's Friday's edition of CNN Student News.

Fridays are awesome. Hope yours is going well so far

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October 23, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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