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  • Hi, I'm Carl Azuz. Today on CNN Student News,

  • many different groups, many different interests, one civil war.

  • We're starting in the Middle Eastern nation of Syria.

  • Its government's been fighting to keep control since war broke out there in 2011.

  • The forces of Syrian President Bashar al- Assad

  • have launched a major campaign against rebel groups and terrorists.

  • But the Obama administration wants al- Assad out of power.

  • The US had a $ 500 million program to train

  • and arm certain rebels who were fighting al- Assad's troops.

  • But an American general said last month

  • that only four or five of the US trained rebels were still in action

  • and the program was recently suspended.

  • Still the US did drop 50 tons of ammunition to Syrian rebel groups

  • overnight on Sunday. And this brings us to Russia.

  • Like the U. S ., it's launching air strikes in Syria,

  • and like the U. S ., Russia says its air strikes are aimed at ISIS terrorists.

  • The U. S. officials say Russia's also targeting Syrian rebel groups,

  • and Russian President Vladimir Putin confirms

  • his troops are there to help Syria's government stay in power.

  • There's several reasons why Vladimir Putin decided

  • to enter the Syrian war at this particular point.

  • President Putin's action was a shock to the world community.

  • He had been supporting for years President Asad, but almost,

  • it appeared, overnight, Russia took several actions,

  • sending in a very large amount of military equipment to Syria,

  • air attacks, on ISIS and then finally sending cruise missiles into Syria.

  • This is a deft and very bold move by President Putin to show that he is a player.

  • That he and his country have to be reckoned with.

  • Potentially they could turn the tide.

  • Afterall President Assad's troops were in trouble

  • and President Putin perceived that it was time to get in there

  • and make sure that Assad did not fall.

  • Another reason that President Putin wanted to enter the fray in Syria

  • was to take attention off what was happening in Ukraine.

  • His country and he getting a lot of criticism

  • and also a lot of sanctions coming his way, and possibly,

  • by looking as if he was solving a problem in the world,

  • perhaps Europe and the United States

  • would not want to impose sanctions coming up again in December.

  • Finally, another reason is President Putin has a visceral hatred

  • for any type of weakening of authority in a government.

  • And so to the end, he has been supporting President Assad

  • simply because he is the leader of Syria.

  • President Putin does not want regimes, even if they're repressive,

  • to fall. Because he feels that chaos will come after that.

  • More instability in another part of the Middle East.

  • Recent stabbing of Israelis, killings of Palestinian attackers,

  • and deadly fighting between Israeli forces and Palestinian protesters.

  • It centers on an historic site that's holy to Jews,

  • who call it the Temple Mount.

  • And Muslims who call it the Noble Sanctuary.

  • Jews are not allowed to pray there.

  • It's considered a provocation, something that angers Muslims.

  • Palestinian leaders have suggested that Israel is planning

  • to change the law to allow Jews to pray at the site.

  • The Israeli government denies this, saying no such plan is in the works.

  • But the violence that's followed,

  • has some observers worried about a possible Intifada,

  • a new uprising of Palestinians.

  • It's arguably the most sensitive real estate on Earth.

  • The Temple Mount, the Haram al- Sharif,

  • as it's known to Muslims, is the epicenter of the long bitter struggle

  • between Israelis and Palestinians.

  • In September 2000, then opposition leader,

  • Ariel Sharon, went there under heavy security.

  • I came here, to the holiestt place of the Jewish people.

  • His visits sparked violent clashes,

  • which marked the beginning of the Second Intifada.

  • And, once again tensions there are fueling more violence

  • say young protesters in the West Bank.

  • Okay, so why are you here today?

  • Because, the mosque we need for us, the for us.

  • So, we will never forgive them.

  • It's here that jews believe their holiest of holies,

  • the Temple of Solomon once stood For Muslim,

  • the Exam Mosque which sits within the compound

  • is where they believe the profit Mohammad

  • made a miraculous night journey from Mecca before sending to heaven.

  • We love to see who's watching worldwide

  • On yesterday's transcript page at cnnstudentsnews. com,

  • we heard from Sacheon, South Korea.

  • It's great to be part of your day there at Gyeongnam International Foreign School.

  • Next, Opelousas is a city in southern Louisiana.

  • We've got the Vikings watching today in Opelousas catholic school.

  • And moving north to North St. Paul Minnesota,

  • hello to our viewers at next step transition program.

  • Thank you all for your requests yesterday.

  • There have been a few Republican debates so far this year

  • among those hoping to win their parties nomination for president.

  • But there hasn't been a debate for the Democrats yet, tonight is the first.

  • You can watch it on CNN, coverage starts at 8: 30 PM Eastern,

  • and just like we did with the most recent Republican debate,

  • we'll bring you highlights from the Democratic one later this week.

  • There are five Democrats

  • who've officially announced their candidacy for president.

  • You'll hear the questions, their answers,

  • you'll see their body language as they try to stand out from their competitors.

  • But there's a lot that happens behind the scenes

  • before the candidates even get on stage.

  • The level of intensity on that stage always is,

  • I don't know if it comes through necessarily all the time

  • through the television when you're watching at home,

  • but there's really nothing like it.

  • You also have a producer in your ear telling you move on,

  • do something else. So, it gets a little complicated.

  • It gets a little tense. We're in there, we're looking at them in person.

  • It's a whole different experience.

  • The candidates try so hard to catch your eye.

  • So they're constantly looking at you and trying to signal that they want in.

  • Make you feel bad for not going to them.

  • Sometimes they can get in but sometimes you have to move along.

  • The other thing that people don't get to see

  • is what happens in the commercial breaks which I thought was really cool.

  • For the most part the candidates will go

  • and they'll sort of check with their aides

  • but there also were a few moments that I witnessed with the candidates

  • and their spouses and their families kind of getting a gut check.

  • You know I think what makes a good question is something

  • that elicits an honest response.

  • I think in crafting a question simplicity and clarity matter most.

  • There are disagreements and differences that you want aired out.

  • Remember what you're doing this for,

  • you're doing this so the viewers out there get a better understanding,

  • a better appreciation of who these men and women are.

  • It's hard to say what makes a good and bad debate question,

  • because so much of the answer to that question

  • is the answer that the candidate gives.

  • They actually listen to what's being said

  • and pivoting off what somebody has just said

  • or perhaps taking a conversation in a different direction

  • to another candidate to bring them in.

  • But if you can either the two candidates words

  • To pit them against each other.

  • Sometimes you ask an open ended question

  • and they go where their mind takes them as opposed

  • to where their talking points take them.

  • So there's a value in that.

  • The worst thing in the world is to just be sitting there

  • with a list of questions that you've thought out in advance

  • and then just waiting for the person to stop talking

  • so you can just go on to the next question.

  • You never want to do that.

  • A lot of The prep is trying to kinda game out what the candidate

  • is or isn't potentially going to say.

  • If, a week later, nobody can remember the name of the moderator

  • but they got information that helped them make their decision,

  • If you run cross country, you wouldn't be impressed

  • by a race that's not much more than 450 meters

  • and fewer than 2600 steps until you consider

  • that it's 450 meters high and 2600 steps up.

  • It's the Canton Tower race, a charge up South China's Canton Tower,

  • one of the tallest buildings in the country.

  • Okay, not every competitor actually runs,

  • but when you consider how many floors this is

  • and how grueling such a race would be.

  • It's perfectly understandable that some would simply stop and stares.

  • Compared to a flat track, this thing is a step up

  • with a clear challenge of foot requiring a strong can shoe perspective

  • and a positive altitude.

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN Student News and I'm out of breath.

Hi, I'm Carl Azuz. Today on CNN Student News,

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October 13, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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