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  • The US Supreme Court is back in session and a related story

  • is first up today on CNN Student News. I'm Carl Azuz.

  • Welcome to the show.

  • Eight associate justices and one chief justice compose the high court.

  • Their new term started yesterday.

  • The Supreme Court will hear a case involving

  • how states draw district lines based on population.

  • That matters, because some say it can affect vote outcomes.

  • Another case involves the fees Americans

  • are required to pay for certain unions.

  • And a third on the docket concerns the controversial issue of affirmative action.

  • It's defined as an effort to improve education or employment opportunities

  • for women and minority groups.

  • Supporters say affirmative action helps protect these groups from discrimination.

  • Opponents say it gives them an unfair advantage in getting jobs or promotions,

  • or getting into schools.

  • Abigail Fisher dreamed of going to the University of Texas

  • at Austin for most of her life.

  • After applying, she didn't get in, attending Louisiana State instead.

  • But the rejection from UT led Fisher to file a lawsuit

  • against the school claiming she was squeezed out,

  • unfairly denied admission because of her race.

  • She's white. After arguments in her case

  • before the court she gave a short statement.

  • I hope the court rules that a student's race

  • and ethnicity should not be considered

  • when applying to the University of Texas.

  • Here's how the admissions process at UT works.

  • The top 10 % of each high school class statewide gets in automatically.

  • For those below the top 10 %, like Abigail Fisher who was in the 11 %,

  • the university uses what it calls holistic review,

  • where race is one of many factors considered to achieve class diversity.

  • Chief Justice John Roberts questioned

  • whether there is any way to measure

  • when a university had reached the right diversity mix,

  • in sync with Abigail Fisher's lawyers

  • who argue the University of Texas did not have narrowly tailored

  • and defined goals for their diversity program.

  • We're saying that before you embark on the use of race,

  • you ought to know what you're trying to achieve.

  • Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said the big question was

  • whether the program admitting top students from Texas high schools

  • wasn't enough diversity by itself.

  • The University's president says no.

  • There is not a business or a school in the country

  • that if they needed ten new employees and said, well, let's take resumes.

  • Got 500 resumes, and then just said,

  • go take the top 10 grade point averages.

  • That's who we'll select. No interest in,

  • do you have experience in the field?

  • Do you have leadership?

  • No one would say that's the only way that we can choose our students.

  • On the UT campus, some minority students

  • we talked to disagree with the point of Fisher's lawsuit.

  • I think she's fighting the wrong fight.

  • Minority student leader,

  • Bradley Poole argues that the UT admission process is fair.

  • Seeing as race is probably one of the least parts of the holistic review process,

  • I feel like it's harping on the wrong, on one of the things that,

  • on the easiest thing that she could have went against.

  • Others take offense that the lawsuit implies some minority students

  • are less deserving of admission than their white counterparts.

  • are less deserving of admission than their white counterparts.

  • To hear people saying that some of us Latinos got in here easily

  • and the only reason we got in here is because of our race,

  • that's really disappointing.

  • We worked just as hard as anyone else did to get here to UT.

  • All right. Let's get our passports out and take roll.

  • We're starting in East Asia. Tokyo, Japan, in the nation's capital.

  • Hello to all of our viewers at Shinjuku High School.

  • Not too far from central North Dakota,

  • you'll find the city and state capita, Bismarck.

  • And it's the Sabers who are watching today at Legacy High School.

  • And in the city of Marion. It's in northeast Arkansas.

  • Hello to the Patriots online today at Marion Intermediate School.

  • Good to see you.

  • The United States and 11 other countries have reached a massive

  • and controversial trade deal.

  • It's called the Trans- Pacific Partnership, or TTP.

  • Negotiations have been going on for years.

  • And though President Obama supports the TTP,

  • one interesting thing about it is that it has other supporters,

  • and outspoken opponents, among US Democrats and Republicans.

  • So you can't really say that one party generally wants it and one doesn't.

  • That's significant because the TPP is not a done deal.

  • It has to be approved by Congress

  • and the legislatures of the 11 other countries before it actually takes effect.

  • The TPP, or Trans- Pacific Partnership.

  • The Trans- Pacific Partnership is a trade deal

  • that encompasses 40 % of the world's economy.

  • There are 12 of them total participating in the deal,

  • but just as important as those 12 is the one that's not.

  • China. China. Our goal with China. We were talking about China. China. Inside of China. It was China.

  • I'd much rather have our problems than China's problems.

  • The deal is all about setting the rules on labor,

  • the environment, economics, around that Asia Pacific region.

  • In a way that lets the United States have a lot to do with it

  • and sort of prevents China from setting lower standards.

  • On the pro side, you've got businesses

  • that are arguing this would be a chance for the United States

  • to sell more cars and food into Japan.

  • To import cheaper shirts and shoes from Vietnam,

  • to protect the pharmaceutical drug industry from cheaper generic knockoffs

  • in countries that can't afford these medicines.

  • But the opponents argue that

  • this would put American manufacturing jobs at risk.

  • And they also worry about the impact, On countries,

  • like Malaysia where it wouldn't be able to make these generic drugs.

  • The real pearl in this deal for American companies is Japan.

  • The United States doesn't have a trade deal with Japan yet.

  • And this is an opportunity to get one.

  • But Japan has a lot of small family farmers

  • who don't want to be put at risk of competing

  • against American agricultural giants.

  • That's just one example of the really tricky political situations

  • that exist in all 12 countries.

  • Each hesitant to take these major political risks

  • without knowing that the United States

  • is definitely on board with them.

  • And again, Congress will determine that.

  • But you heard President Obama repeatedly say China.

  • Why is the US so concerned about China?

  • For one thing, it's a rival of America.

  • Both nations are in an economic and political competition.

  • Experts expect China's economy to eclipse America's in the years ahead,

  • though there's disagreement over when that'll happen.

  • China is officially a communist state,

  • meaning its government controls the media and the economy.

  • But Chinese business boomed after that

  • government relaxed that control.

  • China is the world's second largest economy, and the biggest importer.

  • But 40 years ago, it was a poor, largely raw nation,

  • with at least 30 % of its population living in poverty.

  • That started to change in 1978,

  • when China launched major economic reforms. The first were agricultural.

  • Farmers were allowed to sell their surplus crops on the open market.

  • Success in agriculture and more open trade

  • led to the privatization of other state owned enterprises.

  • In 1980, China became a member of the World Bank,

  • and the International Monetary Fund.

  • That's the same year it created four special economic zones

  • to encourage foreign direct investment.

  • As the economy opened up to the outside world,

  • companies flooded into China to build factories and take advantage of cheap labor.

  • Stock markets in Shanghai and Shenzhen opened in 1990.

  • Economic growth boomed the follow decade, averaging 10 % a year.

  • More than 500 million people have been lifted out of poverty

  • since China's economic reforms began.

  • I'm Carl Azuz, bringing you news of a moose on the loose.

  • It's not just a ruse.

  • Here are some views of a mooschievous moose,

  • who's got plenty of juice, and maybe running shoes in place of his hooves.

  • He rapidly moves making no moos or coos,

  • through a neighborhood whose people got quite a boost

  • from the wayward moose.

  • Until police used some smooth moves to escort

  • to the woods the footloose moose's caboose, unlike Dr. Seuss.

  • And even though we're moose- tly done with the show,

  • you moost come back tomorrow

  • for another a- moose- ing edition of CNN Student Moose.

The US Supreme Court is back in session and a related story

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October 06, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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