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  • You're only a day away from Friday

  • and youre about to get up to speed on international events.

  • I'm Carl Azuz.

  • First up, Russia has launched its first air strikes

  • in the Middle Eastern nation of Syria.

  • It's a country where the U.S. has been leading air strikes for months,

  • and Russia says it has the same target, the ISIS terrorist group.

  • And U.S. officials said yesterday that Russia's air strikes

  • appear to be in places where ISIS isn't operating

  • and American leaders are concerned that

  • Russia won't just be targeting ISIS

  • but fighting any enemies of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

  • There are several different sides to Syria's ongoing civil war.

  • One is the Syrian government which Russia supports

  • but the U.S. opposes.

  • There are Syrian rebels who were fighting their government.

  • And there are terrorists who want the land for themselves.

  • As Russia joins the conflict through air strikes,

  • it's telling American aircraft to avoid

  • Syria's airspace while it does.

  • This simply is not an area where ISIS is located,

  • no matter what the Russians say.

  • This is an area where anti-Assad, anti-regime militias

  • have been fighting the Assad government.

  • This by all indications is a military strike

  • to prop up the Assad regime.

  • Right now, what the Russians have done is

  • it create an exquisite military problem for U.S. pilots.

  • What has to happen now, officials say,

  • there are going to have to be so-called rules of engagement.

  • If U.S. pilots flying in Syrian airspace and they will continue to fly,

  • if they encounter Russian aircraft,

  • what are the rules of the road?

  • If they feel threatened, even inadvertently,

  • let's say the Russians are making the mistake,

  • they don't understand it’s a U.S. aircraft,

  • what are the rules of the road for U.S. military pilots

  • encountering Russian aircraft?

  • Do they have the right of self defense?

  • Can they counterattack against the Russians if they feel a threat?

  • These are the questions that the Pentagon wanted to sit down

  • and talk to the Russians about.

  • It was just earlier this week, of course,

  • that President Obama and Russian President Putin said

  • there would be talks between the two militaries

  • to work all of this out.

  • But now, the Russians have taken the first step.

  • They've gone ahead and done it, and here at the Pentagon,

  • a lot of unhappiness to put it mildly about

  • what the Russians are doing and what may come next.

  • One request a day is the way to put your school

  • in the running for our "Roll Call".

  • The address, CNNStudentNews.com.

  • The Broncs are up first today.

  • Galloping in from Billings, Montana,

  • Billings Senior High School is awesome.

  • Staying out in the west,

  • it's great to see the Scouts scouting out a shoutout.

  • Laramie Senior High School is in Laramie, Wyoming.

  • And on the shores of the Persian Gulf,

  • we heard from the American International School Kuwait.

  • It's in the capital Kuwait City.

  • Over the past few years, we've reported on global temperatures,

  • how scientists say they've been some of the warmest on record.

  • That's one reason why this is such a mystery to researchers.

  • They're calling it a blob, a large area in the North Atlantic

  • that's registering some of its coldest temperatures on record.

  • Don't get this confused with the blob in the Pacific.

  • There's one there, too.

  • It's a warm area of that ocean blamed on El Nino,

  • a natural process that extends from the Central Pacific to South America.

  • Scientists don't know what’s causing the cold Atlantic blob.

  • One theory is that melting ice in Greenland

  • is bringing down ocean temperatures in the region around it.

  • There's no scientific consensus about

  • whether this blob is related to climate change.

  • Researchers say it appears to be the exact opposite

  • of the El Nino warming on the other side of the hemisphere.

  • Another mystery in the Atlantic Ocean involves a storm named Joaquin.

  • It strengthened into a category one hurricane yesterday.

  • It's expected to hit the Bahamas today.

  • So, preparations are being made for that.

  • But where will it go afterward? Here's one forecast model.

  • It shows Hurricane Joaquin spinning north,

  • roughly parallel to the U.S. east coast.

  • But meteorologists don't have a lot of confidence in this.

  • Some say it could turn west and hit North Carolina,

  • some say it could turn east and spin out to sea.

  • The last major storm to make landfall in the eastern U.S.

  • was Hurricane Arthur in 2014.

  • Where are we getting these storm names?

  • If you live in Homestead, Florida, in 1992,

  • Andrew is a name you will never forget.

  • Just like in 2005, if you live in New Orleans area, Katrina.

  • The military started naming storms after their wives,

  • their girlfriends, but none of these names were made public.

  • So, 1950, everything changed.

  • Several storms formed out in the Atlantic about the same time,

  • it created a lot of confusion.

  • So, the U.S. Weather Bureau said, OK, let's start naming storms.

  • And they actually started by using the World War II alphabet,

  • Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog, Easy.

  • But this created confusion as well,

  • because every year, the storm names were the same.

  • It wasn't until 1979 that we started alternating male and female names.

  • We recycle that list every six years.

  • In the Atlantic Basin, we use English, Spanish and French names.

  • No storms are named after a particular person.

  • In fact, you can't request a storm to be named after you.

  • That entire process is handled by the World Meteorological Organization.

  • A storm name will be retired if it is too costly or deadly

  • and it would be inappropriate to use it in future years.

  • In fact, since 1950, there had been nearly 80 storm names retired.

  • And what happens if we go through all of the storm names?

  • Well, it happened in 2005.

  • We ended up going to the Greek alphabet.

  • So, that's what's in a name.

  • It took a long time to get here, but just like each individual name,

  • each storm tends to have its own personality.

  • If you're ever investigating finger prints at a crime scene,

  • you better hope there were no koala bears involved.

  • Why?

  • Because they have fingerprints y'all,

  • and they're koala lot like ours.

  • Even under a microscope, the finger prints of koala bears

  • strongly resemble those of people.

  • So, maybe it was Colonel Mustard in the library with the candle stick.

  • Or maybe it was the koala. And that’s random!

  • All right. James Langevin is one of the 435 voting members

  • of the U.S. House of Representatives.

  • He's one of the two representatives from Rhode Island.

  • Langevin is a member of the House Armed Services Committee.

  • He's prioritized issues like national security,

  • cybersecurity and health care.

  • But it's what he's overcome to get where he is

  • that makes him today's "Character Study".

  • Sixteen- year-old James Langevin was volunteering at a local police station

  • when an officer's gun accidentally discharged.

  • The bullet ricocheted off a locker is what I'm told,

  • and the bullet went through my neck and severed my spinal cord.

  • Langevin was paralyzed from the waist down

  • and has limited mobility in his arms.

  • The question I had right from the get-go,

  • how am I going to live any kind of a meaningful life going forward?

  • But Langevin did just that.

  • He attended college, went on to Harvard's Kennedy School of Government,

  • and was elected a Democratic congressman

  • for the state of Rhode Island.

  • Motivated, he says, by his own desire to prove the naysayers wrong.

  • I would hear the, well, you are a nice guy,

  • but this is a rough business and you're better off doing something else.

  • You know, it's always when you tell me I can't do something

  • that, you know, I'll find a way.

  • He did find a way.

  • On the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act,

  • Langevin made history.

  • For first time in our country's history,

  • a gentlemen with the challenges that Mr. Langevin faces

  • is presiding as speaker of the House of Representatives.

  • I hope that the people can look at me and say,

  • you know, here is a guy with tremendous challenge and difficulties,

  • but somehow he -- he's made it.

  • Before we go, you might not think a cat and an owl

  • will get along very well,

  • especially because the cat is a cat and the owl is an owl.

  • But believe it or not, these two are BFFs.

  • They hang out. They play. They don't attack each other.

  • The cat sometimes nozzles the owl,

  • while the bird preens the cat.

  • Who says a feline and a bird of prey can't get along?

  • Now, if they can just find a way to go hunting together,

  • whether they stalk or wing it, there's no food fast enough to out-fast,

  • or out-last this fast-tinating friendship.

  • We cat to be going, but I'll be back tomorrow

  • and hope you'll hunt for us again at CNNStudentsNews.com.

You're only a day away from Friday

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October 01, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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