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  • Hey, my name is Carl Azuz.

  • Welcome to our viewers around the world

  • to your midweek edition of CNN Student News.

  • We're starting today in the eastern European nation of Hungary.

  • When hundreds of frustrated migrants at a Hungarian

  • holding camp broke through police lines, CNN was there.

  • We're running now with these migrants

  • and refugees who just broke out of the holding area

  • right along the border with Serbia.

  • The police are literally right behind them. >> Stop, stop.

  • CNN. The police are literally right behind a man in front.

  • The people who ran were reportedly fed up with the conditions in the holding area.

  • And when police were able to stop about half of them,

  • the authorities brought them food and water.

  • Hungary's been at the forefront of Europe's deepening refugee crisis.

  • Many of the people arriving there from Afghanistan,

  • Iraq and Syria are passing through,

  • hoping for a new life in Western Europe.

  • But some have complained of bad conditions at holding areas

  • and camps in Hungary, and are afraid they'll get stuck there.

  • Hungary's government says it's just trying to enforce rules on travelers

  • who don't have the right documentation.

  • In Europe, refugees have certain rights.

  • The right not to be sent back to their home countries.

  • The rights to housing, work, and education.

  • Most of those who are fleeing ISIS terrorists in Iraq,

  • war- ravaged conditions in Afghanistan,

  • and terrorism and civil war in Syria are considered to be refugees.

  • Some others are considered migrants,

  • people hoping to resettle in countries with better opportunities.

  • It's creating a historic humanitarian crisis for Europe.

  • A number of countries are accepting these people.

  • Germany expects to take in 800, 000 asylum seekers at a cost of $ 6. 7 billion.

  • Some other European nations say they can't afford or keep up with the flood of people.

  • Well this is the kind of temporary housing

  • that German Chancellor Angela Merkel says she wants to see more of.

  • In fact, Germany is planning to build 150, 000 areas like this.

  • As you can see, it's got a playground area for the children,

  • but behind there, these are basically shipping containers

  • that have been bolted together.

  • And inside it's kind of like a one bedroom apartment.

  • Enough for a family with a kitchenette, a toilet,

  • each floor has showers and a communal kitchen.

  • And the idea is that refugees would come here,

  • live here for about a year before they were able to get out on their own.

  • Now, this is the kind of warm welcome that Germany is putting out.

  • But there is a segment of society here, however small,

  • that does not like to see these newcomers incoming into Germany.

  • In fact just yesterday there was an arson attack,

  • a fire that burned down a shelter just like this.

  • Fortunately, nobody was killed. There were some minor injuries.

  • But it does go to show that there are these kinds of attacks.

  • So this is the kind of tension that the German government now

  • has to consider as every day, thousands more enter Germany.

  • Atika Shubert, CNN Berlin.

  • Time for the shoutout.

  • Which of these landmarks would you find in Salisbury Plain?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Is it A, Ayers Rock, B, Half Dome, C, Giant's Causeway, or D, Stonehenge?

  • You've got three seconds, go.

  • Salisbury Plain is outside of Salisbury, England.

  • And that's the home of Stonehenge.

  • That's your answer and that's your Shoutout.

  • It's one of the most famous monuments in the world.

  • Archeologists believe Stonehenge

  • was built between the years 3000 and 1520 BC.

  • It appears to have been a cemetery at one point,

  • but no one knows for sure who built Stonehenge and why.

  • Theories have described it as a temple, a meeting place,

  • a monument for predicting eclipses.

  • Those theories are being tested and new ones born,

  • thanks a remarkable find not far away. It takes your breath away.

  • People from all over travel to see Stonehenge.

  • Its construction and its purpose remain a mystery thousands of years old.

  • And now we're learning that just two miles away from here,

  • a discovery so extraordinary, experts are calling it archaeology on steroids.

  • Scientists used ground- penetrating radar technology to make the discovery.

  • They found at least 40 stone slabs and spaces for at least 160 more.

  • It's incredible to be here, knowing beneath my feet,

  • the remnants of an ancient monument 15 times the size of Stonehenge.

  • The National Trust's Nick Snashall says

  • the new find rewrites the history of the area.

  • This place seems to have formed To have had three different functions.

  • It started life as a settlement. Once the settlement went out of use

  • and they'd stop building Stonehenge,

  • then it became a place that was revered, it became a place of ritual.

  • So that's when they seemed to bring in the stones.

  • But then very shortly there afterwards,

  • somebody decides that the ritual needs to be done in a different way.

  • That's the ceremony and the site are not doing it quite right.

  • So they change it, and they bury the lot.

  • And what does this tell us?

  • I think what it tells us is that the story of the Stonehenge landscape

  • is much more complicated than we'd ever thought it was.

  • So the mystery of Stonehenge deepens.

  • Always. Erin McLaughlin, CNN, Durrington Walls.

  • Fun fact, the nation of South Africa has three capitals,

  • an administrative one, a judicial one, and a legislative one.

  • First school in our Roll Call is in the legislative capital of Cape Town.

  • Welcome to everyone watching at the American International School of Cape Town.

  • To the midwestern US, we're visiting our friends at River Valley Jr / Sr High School.

  • It's in Correctionville, IA, the home of the Wolverines.

  • And in the cowboy state of Wyoming, Carey Jr. High School is watching in Cheyenne,

  • the home of the Braves. About 60 miles southeast of Anchorage,

  • in southern Alaska, there's a community named Whittier.

  • It's pretty remote. You can only get there

  • by sea or by driving through a long mountain tunnel.

  • An estimated 700, 000 people visit Whittier each year,

  • but only about 218 folks permanently live there

  • and most of them are under one roof.

  • What is this place? It's a small little town.

  • Everything is in one building. This building has a mystique.

  • It's a 14- story building built in World War II.

  • We have everything we need here.

  • We don't even have to leave the building for weeks.

  • Downstairs we have the post office.

  • The city office. We have a grocery store.

  • We have a clinic that's on the third floor. It's like a city all under one roof.

  • We are in the Whittier community school.

  • It is connected by an underground tunnel to the building that we all live in.

  • And remember, that's up until this point in the book.

  • On a day to day basis it's a lot like a really big family.

  • Of course there's family squabbles that take place.

  • But most of the time they're all handled within the family.

  • So these are the main characters.

  • We don't always all love each other,

  • and we don't always all get along, but when something awful happens,

  • everyone is going to be there to help you.

  • Why do you live in Whittier,

  • and what's it like living in the same building as everybody else?

  • It makes me laugh, because it's just home to us. It's home.

  • It's nothing out of the ordinary.

  • It may be a little different, but it's home.

  • When an 11- year- old in Nantucket tossed it

  • into the sea on January 20th, 2014,

  • he might have been thinking,

  • I hope that someone gets my message in a bottle.

  • His family had done this before.

  • One bottle traveled a few miles to Martha's Vineyard.

  • One went over 100 miles to Long Island Sound.

  • This one made it to England, more than 3, 000 miles away.

  • A man there found it on a dive.

  • And the sender, who's now 12, is hoping he'll write back.

  • We're glad the finder got video of himself opening it,

  • and didn't just Nan- tuck it it away for another day.

  • Might have sent the wrong message about the message

  • and kept the project all bottled up. An opportunity lost at sea.

  • Sailing through ten minutes of commercial free news and puns,

  • I'm Carl Azuz for CNN Student News.

Hey, my name is Carl Azuz.

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September 9, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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