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  • Great to have you starting your week with CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Some of you are starting a new school year today.

  • So, thank you for making us part of that.

  • I`m Carl Azuz, with 10 minutes of commercial-free current events.

  • First up, a U.S. ambassador says we often use the word "hero",

  • in this case, it's never been more appropriate.

  • She's talking about three Americans who are on vacation in Belgium.

  • They were on a high-speed train when a man with a rifle started shooting.

  • The three Americans, two of them have been served in the U.S. military,

  • fought against the attacker.

  • And with help from a Frenchman and a Briton,

  • they were all over to overpower the gunman.

  • World leaders say they stopped what could have been a mass murder.

  • The suspect is a Moroccan who's known to European police

  • for his radical Muslim views. He was arrested.

  • The attempted attack was the kind

  • that has governments worldwide on guard.

  • So, I want to start with a direct question

  • and that is -- are you over terror threat warnings?

  • If you are, it's understandable.

  • They are so many of them and they seem constant.

  • So, I want to explain what's behind the current threat warning

  • about the risk of lone wolf terror attacks here on the U.S. homeland.

  • Now, the current threat warning is not what they call

  • in intel circles credible and specific,

  • in that they don't know of a particular target,

  • a particular group, a particular time.

  • But U.S. intel, U.S. law enforcement is genuinely

  • concerned about an ISIS call to arms to supporters around the world.

  • There is a difference of opinion among counterterror officials

  • I speak as to how unique this threat is.

  • Some say, it's the worst they've seen since 9/11,

  • others say they've seem this threat level many times since then.

  • But regardless of that difference of opinion,

  • what is different now is the level of unpredictability,

  • because lone wolves act alone or in small groups,

  • and with little operational planning,

  • there's no operational planning to interrupt

  • and there's no contact or little contact with leadership

  • back in Iraq or Syria or elsewhere

  • that can give an indication of an attack to come.

  • So, there are fewer chances to get early warnings of terror attacks

  • and fewer chances to stop them.

  • The good news is that lone wolf attacks tend to be less complex

  • and therefore less deadly.

  • So, let me leave you with one hopefully comforting thought.

  • The actual risks to Americans of being hurt

  • by a terror attack on U.S. soil is miniscule.

  • But the power of terrorism is in even

  • that small risk makes Americans feel unsafe.

  • Time for the shoutout.

  • Which of these animals is associated with a stock market that`s on the rise?

  • If you think you know it, shout it out. Is it bull, eagle, pig or bear?

  • You`ve got three seconds. Go!

  • When investors are buying, prices are rising and the markets improving,

  • it said to be a bull market.

  • That's your answer and that's your shoutout.

  • But it sure didn't look like that last week.

  • On Wall Street Friday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average,

  • it's an average of 30 significant U.S. stocks took a nose dive.

  • It dropped nearly 531 points.

  • The gains it had made so far this year wiped out.

  • Analysts are now saying it's in correction.

  • Stocks are sometimes said to be in correction

  • after a 10 percent drop from their most recent high.

  • It could be that their prices have been going up too fast

  • and that this will correct or put them back down where they should be.

  • Either way, a drop this deep is significant because the Dow,

  • which is watched worldwide,

  • is one indicator of the health of the global economy.

  • Well, there's no sugarcoating it.

  • It was the worst week for the stocks since 2011.

  • Friday alone was the worst loss of the year, a 530-point drop on the Dow.

  • This rout.

  • The Dow is plunging.

  • And it doesn't look one bit good.

  • Fear grips the market around the world.

  • It was a week of worse. And now, it's official.

  • The Dow is on a correction.

  • That's a 10 percent decline from the recent record high.

  • Andthat record, by the way, we just hit that a few months ago.

  • Now, how quickly things have turned around.

  • Big names like Starbucks, Facebook, Amazon,

  • are also down more than 10 percent from their recent highs.

  • And here's where it boils down to -- the Fed, the economy and oil.

  • First, let's take the global economy.

  • China specifically, the world's second largest economy

  • is slowing and this past week, a new report confirmed that for investors.

  • Second, we have the Federal Reserve.

  • Investors have been expecting a rate hike next month

  • for the first time in a decade.

  • But, lately, we've been getting mixed signals from policymakers.

  • If they hold of, investors might think the Fed is worried about the economy.

  • Finally, there's oil. Sure, that means cheap gas,

  • but it's not really a good thing.

  • We've got a glut of oil in the market and demand is slowing.

  • Roll it all together,

  • and it spells trouble for the markets all around the world.

  • But if there's a silver lining it's this --

  • we're still in the midst of a very long and very strong bull market.

  • It's normal and, many say,

  • healthy to have these little checks every now and then.

  • Carl Azuz? Here.

  • Let`s see who else is present as we present today's "Roll Call".

  • Hiram, Georgia, is watching CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Hello to the Hornets. Great to see you at Hiram High School.

  • Moving up to Eastern U.S., we're making a stop in West Virginia

  • for the Princeton Senior High School Tigers in Princeton.

  • And across the Pacific,

  • welcome to the Thai-Chinese International School.

  • It's in Bangkok, the capital of Thailand.

  • Thanks for your request at CNNStudentNews.com.

  • A historic four-year drought in California

  • is worsening another disaster in the state

  • -- its share of the U.S. western wildfires.

  • Going into the weekend,

  • there were more than 12 wildfires burning across California,

  • and more than 12,000 firefighters battling them.

  • Even after they're brought under control, though,

  • the effects of the drought will remain.

  • Cities are limiting residents' water use.

  • Reservoirs are well below where they should be.

  • And though some people have found the water source

  • in the ground beneath their feet, that ground is sinking.

  • Parts of California are sinking.

  • And the signs, they're everywhere.

  • You just need to know where to look.

  • This site is compacting while we're standing here.

  • Since the '30s, early '30s,

  • about 10 feet of subsidence happened at this location.

  • So, we should be standing like at least my body height on top of me.

  • Yes, right.

  • That's where we could have been in the '30s standing up there.

  • Yes.

  • Subsidence is the gradual sinking of an area of land.

  • As a debilitating drought continues to grip the state,

  • many have turned to underground water to fill in the gaps.

  • Now, some 60 percent of the state's water

  • is being pumped out of the ground and mainly for agricultural needs.

  • Without that cushion of water,

  • the ground is collapsing down into where that water once was.

  • No one would build a cement foundation above the ground like this.

  • This is happening because of subsidence.

  • Infrastructure has to be replaced.

  • So, that's one facet and at least that's a repairable.

  • It's very expensive but it is fixable.

  • Believe it or not, I'm walking on a bridge right now.

  • But through many years of subsidence,

  • this bridge has collapsed down into the earth,

  • so much so that the road is actually below the water level of this canal.

  • Anything that crosses these areas, roads, railways, pipelines,

  • all of those things can be affected if there's enough differential subsidence.

  • It only going to subside to parts where you're pulling the water out.

  • We passed legislation in the state to start monitoring

  • and trying to make our groundwater basins come into balance.

  • One of the issues with that is it's going to take about 20 to 25 years

  • before we have to put and implement those policies.

  • Yes, 20 to 25 years, but you're talking about

  • the Central Valley losing a foot a year.

  • Yes. So, locally --

  • Where we're standing right now, I mean,

  • we could be standing down there by the time that happens.

  • Yes, it's a problem and different water agencies

  • are going to have to work together to figure

  • that out and some of them are going to figure out, OK,

  • maybe we need to do something about this sooner than 20, 25 years from now.

  • It's not easy to make a half court shot, period.

  • But under pressure, let's say a big chunk of the school is watching,

  • and you're at a college with a student body

  • of more than 20,000 people and your tuition is on the line.

  • What do you do?

  • If you're Len Turner, you nail.

  • Yes, there's good reason why he's celebrating, too.

  • Out of state tuition at Indiana's Ball State University

  • is more than $11,000. But this semester, for Mr. Turner

  • and his splendiferous shooting skills, tuition will be nothing.

  • Well, nothing but net.

  • The shot he sunk shrank his fees, a sinking feeling that's appealing,

  • living him reeling and sealing savings in

  • what he might call B-Ball State University.

  • One more thing today, we are now on Instagram.

  • So, if you are already on Instagram, you can find us @CNNStudentNews.

  • Just look for that blue check mark. Have a great day.

Great to have you starting your week with CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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August 24, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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