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  • Welcome to 10 minutes of commercial- free current events.

  • I`m Carl Azuz for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Hope your Thursday is going well.

  • We`re starting in Syria.

  • The situation in this Middle Eastern country

  • is the world`s largest humanitarian crisis.

  • That`s according to the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

  • Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed

  • in Syria`s ongoing civil wars, started in 2011.

  • More than 11 million have fled their homes.

  • And the ISIS terrorist group, which wants to create its own country,

  • has taken over large parts of Syria.

  • Amid everything that`s going on, ISIS is destroying historic artifacts.

  • The Muslim militants have taken aim at many relics

  • that aren`t associated with Muslim culture.

  • They recently murdered a Syrian professor

  • who refused to pledge to ISIS and to tell them

  • where certain archeological treasures are in the Syrian city of Palmyra.

  • He wasn`t the only Syrian peacefully defending his county`s artifacts.

  • This is the centerpiece in the heart of

  • the Syrian Antiquities Ministry`s efforts

  • to save this country`s cultural heritage, of course, in this time of the civil war.

  • What you can see here is these volunteers here

  • are cataloguing small pieces -- we can look at them

  • -- of artifacts that have been found in various places here in the country.

  • Of course, some of them in places that are now controlled by ISIS.

  • Now, all of them are going to get a number, and then afterwards,

  • what`s going to happen is they`re going to go to the station over here

  • where you can see that all these pieces are photographed.

  • And the folks here have already done an amazing amount of work.

  • They`ve catalogued more than 150,000 pieces already,

  • 35,000 of those from the Palmyra area alone.

  • So, they`ve been working a lot and under very difficult conditions,

  • because these building here has taken mortar rounds in the past.

  • There have been scientists from this building

  • that have been killed and yet the folks

  • come here almost every day to continue this work.

  • See if you can ID me.

  • I`m a water-soluble compound found in many plants.

  • I`m a group of simple carbohydrates and my most common form is sucrose.

  • I`m sugar, naturally extracted from sugarcane

  • and sugar beads and I`m pretty sweet.

  • A controversial proposal concerning sugar.

  • It comes from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration,

  • which overseas the safety and labeling of the foods Americans eat.

  • It wants new nutrition labels to clearly show the added sugars in foods.

  • We`re not talking about what`s naturally occurring in fruits for instance,

  • but how many grams of sugar food makers add to that.

  • The FDA wants the recommended value for the average

  • adult to be 50 grams of added sugars.

  • The sugar association

  • which represents some major U.S. sugar producers opposes this.

  • It says the scientific evidence used in the FDA's dietary guidelines

  • is limited and weak, and that it doesn`t meet the FDA's own scientific standards.

  • The FDA recommends 300 grams of carbs a day,

  • 2.4 of sodium and 65 for fat. But sugar? I have no idea,

  • and that`s probably because the industry doesn`t want me to.

  • I read nutrition labels.

  • Almost all nutrients have a percent daily value

  • that gives consumers a yard stick for

  • how much they should be eating or drinking.

  • Sugar stands out because it doesn`t have one.

  • Because the food industry fought against it.

  • The sugar industry is very good at labeling and very,

  • very good at getting what it wants.

  • The sugar industry has spent at least $54 million lobbying since 2009.

  • Soda and beverage companies, well,

  • they spent $113 million fighting measures

  • like sugar taxes during the same period.

  • Right now, the industry wants the federal Food and Drug Administration

  • to drop proposal for labeling sugar.

  • The agency thinks the added information

  • will actually discourage the average American

  • from eating more than 50 grams of sugar a day.

  • Most Americans eat twice amount of sugar than this particular cap.

  • And Americans aren`t overdosing on fruit.

  • They`re getting high on added sugar.

  • We`re not just talking soda and ice cream -- ketchup.

  • Four grams of sugar per tablespoons.

  • Salad dressing, tomato sauce, even cereals that are marketed as healthy.

  • That means this is 24 percent, a quarter,

  • of the amount of sugar that you`re allowed to have for an entire day.

  • Fruit juices.

  • Orange juice has as much sugar in it as a soft drink.

  • And how about this one? Bread.

  • But I look here, wheat, flour, eggs -- sugar is the third ingredient.

  • So, every one of these has 10 percent

  • of the day`s sugar allotment. I bet they`re delicious.

  • Hypothetically, you can have a cup of this,

  • a cup of this, a teaspoon of that, this, a cup of this,

  • Oh, absolutely. Absolutely.

  • I mean, easily, right?

  • With no trouble at all.

  • So, that`s why food companies are so opposed

  • to having this daily value on the food label

  • because they know that customers will be shocked

  • when they see how much sugar there is in products

  • where they might have suspected.

  • From our "Roll Call" request page at CNNStudentNews.com

  • -- Santa Fe Christian School is watching this Thursday.

  • In Solana Beach, California, look up to the Eagles.

  • To the U.S. heartland, in Carthage, Missouri,

  • the Tigers are on the prowl. Good to see Carthage High School.

  • And for the first time in our "Roll Call",

  • we`re visiting Romania, in the capital of Bucharest.

  • Hello to the American International School of Bucharest

  • The "Roll Call" is a chance for your school

  • to get recognized on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • There`s one place where you look for your request.

  • Each day`s transcript page at CNNStudentNews.com.

  • Just click the words that say "Roll Call".

  • We announced schools from all over the world,

  • but you`ve got to be at least 13 years old to make a request.

  • One comment per day, keeping the spam away, is the way to go to get in our show.

  • The New Horizon spacecraft has traveled for more than nine years,

  • covering over 3 billion miles to give us our closest view yet of Pluto.

  • Launched January 19th, 2006 from Cape Canaveral,

  • the piano-sized spacecraft is the first to visit the icy world

  • discovered more than 80years ago.

  • When astronomer Clyde Tombaugh first saw Pluto on February 18th, 1930,

  • he only saw a pinpoint of light.

  • Tombaugh was using the best technology he had --

  • a telescope at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona.

  • Flash forward to 1994, the Hubble space telescope

  • floating high above Earth`s atmosphere snapped this image of Pluto

  • and its farthest moon Charon. Then, in 1996, Hubble gave us this.

  • A mosaic of images snapped between 2002

  • and 2003 was assembled in 2010

  • to give us the most detailed view of Pluto at that time.

  • Pluto isn`t the final destination for the New Horizon Spacecraft.

  • The probe will keep flying and deeper into space

  • to explore a region scientists think

  • is filled with hundreds of small icy objects.

  • Of course, space exploration doesn`t happen cheaply.

  • NASA says the New Horizon`s mission costs about $700 million,

  • which is about a middle of the road price

  • for missions in our solar system.

  • What it sent back -- what appears to be a flyover of the Pluto,

  • formerly known as a planet.

  • Scientists say these are mountains that rise about as high

  • over Pluto as the Rocky Mountains do in the western U.S.

  • The New Horizon spacecraft was about 7,700 miles

  • away from Pluto`s surface when it recorded these images.

  • NASA says it will take more than a year

  • to download all the information gathered by the spacecraft on this flyby.

  • One other thing NASA is assisting in, robots,

  • and not just the kind that explore Mars,

  • the kind that battle on earth.

  • One of the ones you`re seeing here is built by MegaBots.

  • It`s a company that makes gigantic fighting robots

  • with formidable weapons, like a paint ball cannon.

  • The company recently challenged a similar one

  • from Japan to a giant robot fight.

  • MegaBots is trying to raise half a million dollars for a bigger,

  • badder, bolder fighting machine.

  • So, you can see what they`re all a-robot.

  • Will this shift technology into an entirely new gear,

  • creating a machinations of fans, generating an automaton of interest?

  • It just depends on how many people get in the heavy metal you all (ph).

  • I`m Carl Azuz of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Just getting more programming-ready for tomorrow.

Welcome to 10 minutes of commercial- free current events.

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August 20, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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