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  • Hello everybody and welcome to learn English Live

  • My name is Steve Ford and I have two great questions from Syria and Ukraine.

  • So let's get to it!!!!

  • Hello Elias, and hello Syria.

  • Even though English can be a devil of a language with all of its exceptions and tricks

  • I know! I am here to help you solve all of your doubts about "finite" differences in pronunciation

  • So Elias from Syria has an excellent question about homographs

  • words that are spelledthe same way but depending on how they are pronounced they can change in meaning

  • Elias uses the example: live vs. "live"

  • So you need to look at how the word is used in the context of the sentence

  • For example, "I live in Vancouver, Canada" vs "I am talking to myself "live" here from Peppy studios with "Steve" on skype

  • There is a longer list on wikipedia for all of the homograph words which I will post below this video

  • privet! Kak dela!

  • Listening to native speakers of English talking fast, like news anchors and hollywood actors can be a huge listening workout

  • So when I think about the languages I speak and am learning: Portuguese, French, Spanish, Russian,

  • I can see all of them use something called Ellypsis

  • What's that? It just means that words are left out of a full sentence since they are understood among native speakers in any given language

  • so let's take: I don't know

  • Portuguese: nao sei, French: j'ai pas, Russia: ne znayu, Spanish: non sei

  • I'm sure there are many other languages out there that leave out words that are understood

  • please leave your comments below if this happens in your language

  • So you can see two examples of ellypsis here

  • "(are) you coming to the party? and "(I) don't know"

  • try to look for ellypsis more and more when you're watching the news, listening to music and of course watching movies

  • From our dialogue example there were some instances of leaving out the t's and g's such as

  • and frequent omissions of "t's

  • I talk until I am blue in the face to my private students about how native speakers of English here leave off the "t's

  • like in our dialogue

  • listen to the difference to textbook English and relaxed spoken English

  • As I said before, we often leave out the "g" in "ing" endings

  • just be careful when you use it because it's a friendly way of talking and wouldn't be used ALL of the time.

  • Yo! Yo!

  • when she says in the dialogue, "I have to work tonight"

  • she doesn't say, I have to or have to work tonight

  • she says, "hafta"

  • so you want to notice how those link together: have to(hafta). Other examples: could have(could'a), should have, (should'a), would have(would'a)

  • which I'm sure I've explained in other videos

  • it just makes speaking a whole lot faster

  • Well everybody I hope you enjoyed my lesson answering two great questions

  • and if you have a question about learning English, feel free to record your question at the link below this video

  • Have a great day and bye for now!

  • Well everybody I hope you enjoyed my lesson answering two great questions

  • and if you have a question about learning English, feel free to record your link

  • little blooper

Hello everybody and welcome to learn English Live

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A2 初級 澳洲腔

學英文 (How to Speak English Fast - Learn English Live 21 with Steve Ford)

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    Kai Xian   發佈於 2015 年 07 月 24 日
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