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  • I`m Carl Azuz with CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • It`s good to see you this Wednesday.

  • Today`s commercial-free coverage starts

  • in the Southern Asian country of Nepal,

  • where there`s been another earthquake:

  • Tuesday`s tremor with magnitude 7.3

  • -- not as powerful as the 7.8 magnitude quake that struck on April 25th,

  • but still deadly and very destructive.

  • It killed at least 50 people in Nepal,

  • 17 people in India and one person in Tibet.

  • It caused more buildings to collapse,

  • more landslides to tumble, and more people to run for their lives.

  • This quake was centered west of Kathmandu

  • and a little closer to the capital than the one two weeks ago.

  • One man said it was like the whole earth was alive.

  • It left more than 1,200 people injured and many others asking,

  • when Nepal can return to normal?

  • The impoverished country still needs help.

  • At CNNStudentNews.com,

  • we have a link to CNN`s "Impact Your World" site.

  • It can connect you to several of the charity

  • and aid organizations that are helping earthquake victims in the region.

  • The Shell oil company is one step closer to drilling for oil

  • in a very cold part of the world, the Chukchi Sea.

  • It`s located in the Arctic Circle, between Alaska and Russia.

  • The U.S. government gave Shell the green light this week,

  • saying that the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

  • had taken into account the environmental,

  • social and ecological resources in the region.

  • Some environmental groups have opposed Shell`s efforts for years.

  • Greenpeace said it could lead to disaster in the Arctic.

  • Shell still needs the approval of some other American organizations

  • before it can start its oil search,

  • and a British energy expert says if oil prices stay low,

  • the company might not get much return on its investment.

  • Yesterday, the Barack Obama Foundation announced that Chicago,

  • Illinois, would be home of the 44th president`s library,

  • specifically the South Side of Chicago.

  • It`s a $500 million project, roughly the cost of the library of his predecessor,

  • President George W. Bush.

  • A presidential library is kind of a library and a kind of a museum

  • and kind of an archive but mainly,

  • it`s a living memorial to the chief executives of our country.

  • The first one came around in the late 1930s.

  • Franklin Roosevelt has been steaming along as president,

  • he looked around his office and he said,

  • I got a lot of papers here.

  • We`ve been dealing with the Great Depression.

  • We need to do something with this record so people can see it later on.

  • Eventually, Congress got on board and said,

  • what we need to do is have a rule here: Basically,

  • the rule is that the president who is going out,

  • raises the money to build his presidential library and museum

  • -- or whatever he wants to call it -- and then the taxpayers take over

  • and basically pay for running it.

  • It`s not a library in the sense that you wouldn`t go

  • and check out a copy of "Black Beauty".

  • The courts decided a long time ago, we gave him a nice house,

  • we gave him a nice job, we gave him a nice office.

  • That stuff belongs to us, we get to see it.

  • So, with a few restrictions,

  • most of the official business of the White House

  • that a president does: the people he meets,

  • conversations he has, everything that`s recorded there,

  • winds up in these archives.

  • Presidential libraries do allow you

  • to have a really up close personal look at these presidents in some ways

  • -- the way you can`t really see it through the news.

  • For example, I walked through Jimmy Carter`s library once

  • with Jimmy Carter and he stopped and talked about his Nobel Prize

  • and how he felt when he got it.

  • Another time, I walked with the elder President Bush through his library,

  • down in College Station, Texas,

  • and we stopped at a replica of his office from Camp David

  • and he stood there and shook his head,

  • he said it`s exactly the way it was.

  • Presidential libraries are tourist attractions

  • and that every town that has one advertises it,

  • but they`re also serving a more serious purpose.

  • Think about this: There are hundreds of millions of documents

  • and papers buried in these libraries,

  • and those are pored over on a weekly basis by historians

  • and researches who every now and then come up with new information

  • that shed new light on how a decision was made, or how a president thought.

  • If you get a chance to go to the White House and talk to the president,

  • be careful what you say, because one day,

  • it could wind up in the presidential library with everybody looking.

  • Are we spending our lives on the Internet?

  • New survey just came out.

  • It studied the time that Britons spent online.

  • It found that people ages 16 to 24

  • spend an average of 27 1/2 hours online every week.

  • That`s more than a day out of every week.

  • And it`s triple the time that a same age group spent online 10 years ago.

  • Internet use for adults in Britain also has gone up.

  • It`s doubled from 10 years ago.

  • Why? British telecommunications regulator Ofcom,

  • which took the survey, says so many more people

  • are using smart phones and tablets.

  • They made it easier to access the Internet from

  • wherever we are and change our habits.

  • Can you name the capital of Albania?

  • It`s the first stop on this Wednesday`s roll call.

  • Tirana is that capital. It`s in central Albania.

  • And we are happy to be part of your day at the World Academy of Tirana.

  • When I say Lexington and Minutemen,

  • you might think Massachusetts.

  • These Minutemen are from Lexington, Nebraska,

  • at Lexington High School.

  • And in north Las Vegas, Nevada, the Longhorns are here.

  • Great to see Legacy High School is watching.

  • A penalty for the New England Patriots,

  • the National Football League`s 2015 championship team

  • was found to have broken the rules by

  • using under-inflated footballs during the playoff game.

  • Last week, an attorney who investigated the incident said it is,

  • quote, "more probably than not"

  • that Patriots quarterback Tom Brady was, quote, "

  • at least generally aware of the inappropriate activities" concerning the footballs.

  • So, this week, the National Football League announced

  • that Brady would be suspended without pay for

  • four games of the next season.

  • The team would be fined $1 million

  • and lose its first round draft pick in 2016

  • and its fourth round week in 2017.

  • NFL executive president Troy Vincent said each player,

  • no matter how accomplished and respected,

  • has an obligation to comply with the rules

  • and must be held accountable when those rules are violated

  • and the public`s confidence in the game is called into question.

  • Brady`s agent called the discipline ridiculous and said

  • that there`s no evidence that the quarterback directed

  • that the footballs be under-inflated. He plans to appeal the decision.

  • Wildfires are tough to fight.

  • Their intensity and direction can change in seconds.

  • Wind can factor in. Sometimes, containing them can be a guessing game for firefighters.

  • Drones could help. They can show what the fire is doing.

  • They can give an Internet signal where there might not otherwise be one,

  • and they may be able to save homes

  • and lives in cities and suburbs as well.

  • Knowing where the fire is important. It`s absolutely important.

  • So, we`re working with Skyfire Consultants

  • and they brought out some drones

  • and we`re going to test it in just real life fire.

  • As an incident commander, we`re always gathering information.

  • It takes about 30 minutes to an hour to get a helicopter in the air.

  • A drone, we can deploy in five minutes.

  • They have a thermal imager.

  • And that thermal cameras are going to allow us

  • to actually see where the fire is.

  • And for an incident commander,

  • that`s a valuable piece of information to have.

  • And what we`re doing here today is what`s called a live burn.

  • A private citizen has donated a vacant construction for us

  • where we can get our recruits and some real live fire training.

  • We have designated three areas that we`re going to burn.

  • And we`ll have the crews go in and attack the fires from different angles.

  • We have to make sure that the crews go in a right position

  • and that extra bit of knowledge goes a long way as far as safety is concern.

  • Photography allows us to see things we otherwise never could,

  • from places we`ve never been.

  • When the Apollo 11 mission reached the moon in 1969,

  • it showed us Earth as we`ve never seen it before.

  • The Hubble space telescope brought us images of Mars we`d never seen.

  • And now, NASA`s Curiosity Rover has captured a sunset from Mars.

  • Not as picturesque as it is for folks in California may be,

  • but Mars is 48 million miles further away from the sun than we are.

  • Some would call that truly a-Mars-ing,

  • some would have curiosity about how NASA a-Mars-ed such images.

  • You could say a roving reporter with lenser-like

  • focused captured the view that`s truly out of this world.

  • I`m Carl Azuz, and we`ll be bringing it back on down to Earth tomorrow.

I`m Carl Azuz with CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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May 13, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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