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  • Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS --

  • current events for middle and high school classrooms, no commercials.

  • This Tuesday, May 12th, Americans from parts of South Dakota and Iowa,

  • stretching down to Arkansas and Texas,

  • are recovering from severe weather.

  • Over the weekend, fierce storms ripped through the country`s midsection.

  • At least five people were killed, dozens were injured,

  • and several were still missing yesterday afternoon.

  • More than 70 tornadoes were reported.

  • One of the areas hardest hit was the northeast Texas town of Van,

  • population: 2,300 plus.

  • A fire marshal there says roughly 30 percent of Van was damaged.

  • The town`s schools were closed after getting this kind of damage on Sunday.

  • The district superintendent said they felt blessed

  • this did not happen during a school day.

  • A high school in Iowa also lost most of its roof.

  • Apparent tornadoes weren`t the only problem.

  • The storms brought sudden flash flooding the areas of northern Texas.

  • Helicopters were called in to airlift people

  • when flood waters covered the roads nearby.

  • So, now, the EF scale, Enhanced Fujita Scale,

  • starts at 0 and goes only to 5.

  • Anything above 200 miles per hour is considered an EF-5 tornado.

  • If you have a 0, you`re going to lose shingles.

  • A 1, you may lose a couple of boards on the roof.

  • A 2, you lose all the windows, and maybe even a wall.

  • A 3, EF-3, you will lose a couple of walls on the outside,

  • but there were still be a part of the home standing.

  • An EF-4, most of the home is gone but you`ll still see the refrigerator,

  • you`ll still a closet and you`ll still the bathroom.

  • An EF-5, you cannot find the house. It`s completely gone.

  • We don`t know how big that Fujita scale will be,

  • how big that tornado will be literally until after we look at the damage.

  • The greatest threat of a tornado is being hit

  • by something that the tornado is moving.

  • If you`re outside or if you`re not protected inside,

  • if you`re hit by 140 mile per hour 2x4, you`re going to be killed.

  • So, you need to be inside and the lowest,

  • somewhere in the middle of the home, away from windows.

  • When you hear the word "warning", and you hear your county,

  • that`s when you need to take cover. When you hear the word "watch",

  • that means something might happen today. Let`s have a plan.

  • When you hear the word "warning", it`s too late to make a plan.

  • You need to already have a plan. Warning is a long word. It`s a bad word (ph).

  • If you knew where the town of Munchberg is,

  • you`ll know one of the places we`re going in today`s roll call.

  • We`re starting in Massachusetts, at John T. Nichols Middle School.

  • It`s great to see the Tigers in Middleborough.

  • In Annapolis, Missouri, we got a request from the Panthers.

  • We got that yesterday. They`re at South Iron High School.

  • And now to Munchberg.

  • It`s in Germany where we`re happy

  • to be part of your day at Munchberg High School.

  • Cicadas, people in Kansas, Missouri,

  • and Mississippi are seeing and hearing them emerged from the ground.

  • Their cacophonous chorus can reach 100 decibels,

  • the loudness of a motorcycle,

  • and it can continue for a month

  • until the next generation of cicadas is established.

  • It doesn`t happen every year,

  • and though it`s not a once in a lifetime event for us, it is for the insects.

  • Call them cicadas, call them cicadas, don`t call them pretty.

  • It`s like someone took a roach slapped on some wings

  • and glued two orange buggy eyes on them.

  • Millions of Americans will soon get an up close and personal view.

  • Every new generation of cicadas emerges from underground to mate,

  • that happens every 13 or 17 years.

  • If their faces are those only cicada mothers could love,

  • they`ve got voices to match, or more accurately,

  • organs on the abdomen of males that vibrant to attract females.

  • When the guys go out on the prowl,

  • the collective sound is like waves of screeching.

  • This may send some human screeching.

  • But they`re more likely to bug us than actually harm us,

  • unless they poke us with their beaks.

  • They`re not especially destructive to plants either.

  • They do help irrigate the soil when they come out,

  • and they`re a veritable buffet for birds and other animals.

  • So, if you see or hear them where you live, keep an eye on your pets.

  • Some cats and dogs seeking cicada snacks can get sick to their stomachs.

  • For that matter, so can we can.

  • Though some enterprising chefs have gotten creative with them,

  • cooking up everything from cicada quiche to cicada ice cream.

  • Not one of the Baskin Robbins 31 flavors.

  • Whether you find them annoying or appetizing,

  • you`ll hear what the buzz is all about.

  • Fifteen to 20 percent of Americans,

  • so probably some people in your class, have some sort of sleep problem.

  • That`s according to the National Institutes of Health.

  • It could be too little sleep, not enough quality sleep.

  • It doesn`t mean just being tired all the time.

  • A number of diseases are linked to getting too little sleep.

  • Tens of thousands of car accidents, too.

  • Billions of dollars are spent every year in medical fees linked to sleep problems.

  • The conditions we sleep in can make a significant difference

  • in the kind and amount of sleep we get.

  • We don`t get enough sleep in the United States.

  • In fact, we`re getting less sleep than ever.

  • And I`ll admit, I`m guilty of it as well.

  • In this country alone,

  • tens of millions of prescriptions are written for sleep medications.

  • People are taking medications more than ever.

  • And they`re taking them with the hope of getting good sleep,

  • which sometimes they can help with.

  • But keep in mind, a lot of times, these types of pills,

  • the affects can last much longer than you realize.

  • Best way to get a good night sleep is obviously to make it a priority,

  • think about this and really think about the fact

  • that you`re going to schedule your time.

  • You`re going to schedule a sleep time, a wake time.

  • You`re going to avoid caffeine and other stimulants later on in the day.

  • Also, if you exercise in a regular basis, which you should,

  • maybe trying to do that earlier in the day as well.

  • Put the devices away.

  • The devices tend to stimulate the mind, making it much harder

  • to turn the mind off and actually get to sleep.

  • And finally, practice something known as good sleep hygiene.

  • They say that, you know,

  • you want to keep your room around 70 degrees or so.

  • Make sure you darken the room as much as possible.

  • And, obviously, take away any stimulation that might keep you awake.

  • So, rule number one: don`t sacrifice your sleep for just about anything.

  • Do that and you`re likely to live to 100.

  • Dr. Jim Withers` father was also a doctor.

  • He worked in the rural area and often made house calls.

  • You can say his son is walking in his footsteps,

  • but in an urban environment.

  • His program called Operation Safety Net

  • has reached tens of thousands of homeless people,

  • and helped hundreds of them transition in the homes.

  • It`s why Dr. Withers is today`s study in character.

  • Street medicine is bringing medical care right to the homeless where they are,

  • under the bridges, along the riverbanks, abandoned buildings.

  • Safety Net, anybody home?

  • It`s going to the people. Can you make a fist? That hurt?

  • I`ve been walking the streets of Pittsburgh for 23 years to treat the homeless.

  • When I started, I was actually really shocked how ill people were in the street.

  • It was like going to a third world country.

  • There were runaway kids, 85 year olds, pregnant women,

  • and they all have their own story. What hurts the most?

  • These knees, so swollen.

  • Once you get to know the folks out there, I knew that I had to keep going.

  • Are you doing OK, medically?

  • And now, we`ve managed to treat over 10,000 people.

  • Did they put staples in or stitches?

  • Infections, diabetes, cancers, it goes on and on and on.

  • All right. I`m glad we saw you.

  • For the folks that are willing to come to us, we have a mobile medical van.

  • Then, we have drop in centers.Open it up again.

  • We connect with the person.

  • You got friends. We`ll be there for you, OK?

  • Then, we advocate with them to get their insurance, get housing and care.

  • Wherever they are, they`re always within our circle of love.

  • You did so much to me --

  • It really is a wonderful feeling that people in the street

  • are beginning to get a voice in health care.

  • Good, steady. You got a good heart.

  • It`s something that we should take pride in,

  • that we can actually treat people the way we want to be treated.

  • Some dogs are athletes. Agility dogs are among the best.

  • You`ve seen them racing, jumping, climbing way before.

  • But probably not like this.

  • It`s a dog`s eye view of overcoming obstacles.

  • Steeple is the name of a champion agility dog.

  • And someone strapped a camera to his back to get his perspective

  • on what it`s like to course through a course,

  • beam across beams, tunnel through tunnels,

  • and race to the race to the winner circle.

  • From the animal`s agility to camera`s ability,

  • the awesome usability showing us the thrill of the race,

  • you could call that steeplechase.

  • Not just a people pleaser. You`d have to agree, sir, that is a steeple pleaser.

  • I`m Carl Azuz. Friday, June 5th,

  • is the date many of you teachers are asking about.

  • Friday, June 5th, will be our last show of the school year.

  • Hope you watch until then.

Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS --

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May 12, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitle

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