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  • Thanks for taking ten minutes for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • I`m Carl Azuz. A quick tour of headlines is what`s first up today.

  • A former professional football player

  • will be spending the rest of his life in prison.

  • 25-year old Aaron Hernandez played tight end for

  • the NFL`s New England Patriots. He had a contract worth $40 million,

  • but Hernandez was arrested in 2013 and convicted yesterday

  • for the murder of his one time friend, Odin Lloyd.

  • Hernandez`s sentence is life without parole.

  • The European Union is suing Google.

  • The E.U. says the internet search company is violating anti-trust laws,

  • unfairly limiting competition in the market place. How?

  • Well, if you search Google for running watch,

  • for example, you`ll see pictures, prices, and links for watches

  • whose companies paid Google to advertise on the site.

  • Competitor`s watches and the best or most relevant running watches

  • may not be top search results.

  • Google says it respectfully but strongly disagrees with the complaint,

  • and says that when Europeans are shopping online

  • they are far more likely to use other sites than Google anyway.

  • Today is a day of remembrance at Virginia Tech.

  • It`s the eight anniversary of a shooting

  • when a student killed dozens of other students

  • and faculty before killing himself. Norris Hall,

  • where most of the victims were, was reopened two years later

  • and now houses the Virginia Tech Center

  • for Peace Studies and Violence Provention.

  • The Al-Shabaab terrorist group attacked

  • a Somalian government building this week.

  • A Kenyan news paper reports that 15 people were killed,

  • at least six of the Islamist militants

  • who want to replace Somalia`s government also died in the attack.

  • It happened less than two weeks

  • after Al-Shabaab targeted Christian students at a Kenyan university.

  • The terror group Al-Shabaab is becoming deadlier and more ambitions.

  • Al-Shabaab means "the youth" in Arabic,

  • and it`s a group that`s risen out of the chaos of the failed state of Somalia.

  • The irony is, as it`s gained more international prominence,

  • it`s actually lost ground at home due to in fighting in the group,

  • successful operations by government sources,

  • but also drone strikes by the U.S.

  • At the same time, though, it`s become more aggressive abroad,

  • particularly in September 2013 when it carried out

  • the West Gate Mall attack which killed more than 60 people.

  • More recently, in April, the attack at Garissa University in Kenya

  • that killed more than 150.

  • Like ISIS, Al-Shabaab has a powerful presence on the web,

  • particularly in terms of recruiting.

  • An added threat are Al-Shabaab`s deep ties

  • to the U.S. A number of Somali Americans from cities

  • such as Minneapolis that have large Somali American communities

  • have gone to Somali to join the ranks of Al-Shabaab.

  • Some of them have become suicide bombers.

  • A man from Alabama, Omar Hammami, became the rapping jihadi,

  • powerful in their recruiting videos, though he was later killed.

  • U.S. counterterror officials are seeing more communication

  • as well as the sharing of know how

  • and technology between Al-Shabaab and other Al Qaeda-tied groups,

  • such as AQAP in Yemen.

  • And they say a credible next step would be cooperation

  • on joint terror operations abroad.

  • For a long time, Al-Shabaab has been seen primarily

  • as a domestic threat in Somalia,

  • but more and more it`s seen as an international one.

  • There are drum rolls, character roles, roles of the eyes,

  • and then there`s the roll call.

  • First up from Eatonton, Georgia, the War Eagles are taking flight.

  • Shout out to Putnam County Middle School.

  • From Texas, at Mt. Carmel Academy in Houston,

  • the Rebel Bulldogs are watching.

  • And in Thompson, North Dakota, say hell to the Tommies (ph).

  • They`re a Thompson public school in the peace garden state.

  • With more than six million people living there,

  • Rio de Janeiro is Brazil`s second largest city.

  • It`s nicknamed Marvelous City.

  • It`s the host city for the 2016 Summer Olympics.

  • Beaches, mountains, a tropical forest, they`re all part of Rio.

  • Unfortunately, so is pollution.

  • And with major preparations under way for next year`s games,

  • the clean up job is bigger and more challenging

  • than some officials thought it would be.

  • Something`s fishy in Rio as Brazil prepares to host the 2016 Summer Olympics.

  • Hoards of dead fish float along the shoreline of Rodrigo de Freitas Lake,

  • the site of next year`s rowing and canoeing events.

  • Olympic hopefuls say the sickening scene

  • has become a serious obstacle to their training.

  • You`re rowing and you start to feel sick, nauseous,

  • so you have to stop training and go rest.

  • The dead fish block the oars and get in the way of our rowing.

  • As of last week, cleaning crews have cleared

  • more than 20 tons of dead fish from the lake.

  • Local authorities say several factors,

  • including lower oxygen levels in the water,

  • are behind the increased number of fish deaths.

  • Government officials say they`ll investigate.

  • It`s not just dead fish.

  • Garbage floating in Guanabara Bay

  • caused this sail boat to capsize during a recent training run,

  • leaving the boat badly damaged.

  • Athletes call the current conditions unacceptable.

  • We see a lot of rubbish, but it`s something we don`t control.

  • We often have to change out tactics

  • due to unconventional factors.

  • Officials of Rio had promised to reduce pollution in the bay by 80 percent,

  • but now admit that target is unlikely.

  • We`ve recently witnessed a similar lagoon

  • near the athlete`s village in Barra da Tijuca.

  • Over here in Baja, there are a series of lagoons

  • that back up against the Olympic village and the Olympic park.

  • You can see the garbage, but there`s also a terrible stench of open sewage.

  • When members of the International Olympic Committee

  • visited Rio in February, they insisted the city will be ready.

  • We have been given the reassurance that all the venues will be met

  • - will meet the level of sustainability.

  • But with less than 16 months until the games begin,

  • problems in pollution continue to overshadow the athletes.

  • After two years of hard work and the money

  • she`d saved back in New Jersey, Maggie Doyne

  • has built a home and a school.

  • It`s a world away in a western district of Nepal.

  • It`s called Kopila, a word meaning flower bud in Nepali,

  • and success is blooming at the home

  • and the school thanks to the efforts of today`s Study in Character.

  • Most 28-year-old girls my age have a very different reality.

  • A lot of engagements and, you know, first babies.

  • I mean, I took a very different path.

  • After high school, I decided to travel around the world with by backpack.

  • In Nepal, for the first time I really saw the effects of civil war,

  • and children and women suffering, and it changed me.

  • There was one little girl,

  • she was standing in a heap of garbage and she said,

  • "Namaste di di (ph)." That means hello, sister.

  • That was the beginning.

  • I called up my parents and I asked them to wire me

  • over my $5,000 of babysitting money.

  • It`s time to get up. Good morning.

  • Good morning.

  • We started with the home and then we built a school.

  • We select children who, without us, would not be able to go to school.

  • A lot of them are begging on the streets. You got it.

  • We have traded one of the top performing schools

  • in the entire region for 350 children.

  • And 50 of those kids live in our home.

  • Our first priority is to keep a child with their family.

  • And then in the severe case of a child who really has nobody,

  • they come in to live in our home.

  • When you walk in the front gates of Kopila Valley,

  • you don`t see suffering. You see healthy, laughing, thriving kids.

  • Welcome to Kopila Valley.

  • Mora Vista (ph) High School`s just south of San Diego, California.

  • t`s about five blocks east of the Pacific Ocean.

  • That`s how far this little guy got last week

  • before he took a break on campus.

  • But seals aren`t officially allowed at school,

  • so officers put him behind bars.

  • Okay, not really.

  • They just harbored him in a patrol car

  • until animal experts could get there to help.

  • Police did say that under questioning he clammed up.

  • I guess his lips were sealed.

  • Maybe he wanted to slip away and didn`t want to be lying about it.

  • There are no cuffs for flippers.

  • He could have escaped by a whisker.

  • The get away would have been a sight to seal.

  • That seals up another edition of CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • We`ll bark at you again tomorrow.

Thanks for taking ten minutes for CNN STUDENT NEWS.

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April 16, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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