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  • New technology is getting credit for saving lives

  • in a collision between a train and a truck yesterday in California.

  • That`s what`s first up today on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • This happened between Oxnard and Camarillo, California.

  • the truck driver reportedly told investigators

  • that he mistook the train tracks for a highway and got stuck driving on them.

  • He got out before the train hit.

  • A spokesman for the train company, Metrolink,

  • says the collision could not have been avoided from a rail standpoint.

  • At least 28 people were sent to hospitals with injuries,

  • but officials say it could have been worse.

  • the train was equipped with something called collision energy management technology.

  • It causes crash energy to expand outward instead of inward,

  • keeping the train cars from crumpling.

  • The train also has special windows that allowed rescuers to access passengers.

  • Yesterday, President Obama vetoed legislation

  • that would have given the green light to the Keystone XL Pipeline.

  • the bill had passed the Republican-controlled House and Senate earlier this month.

  • Supporters say the Keystone XL Pipeline will create jobs.

  • Opponents say it`s possible environmental risks aren`t worth it.

  • The White House opposed the bill because it would have bypassed

  • the president`s authority to approve or deny construction of the pipeline.

  • it`s been under review since it was first proposed more than six years ago.

  • Time for The Shoutout. Who`s the leader the US Federal Reserve,

  • the country`s central bank? If you think you know it, shout it out.

  • Is it Janet Yellen, Ben Bernanke, Mary Barra or Warren Buffet? You`ve got three seconds.

  • Go. Last year, Janet Yellen became the first woman ever to chair the US Federal Reserve.

  • That`s your answer and that`s your Shoutout.

  • One way the Fed can influence the US economy is by raising or lowering interest rates.

  • it wants to keep the economy growing, but not too quickly.

  • that can cause inflation, when prices go up and the value of the dollar goes down.

  • Interest rates right now are very low.

  • some critics say that`s keeping Americans from saving money in savings accounts.

  • Why do it if you don`t earn interest?

  • The other side argues that now isn`t the time to raise interest rates

  • because even though the stock market has been setting record highs,

  • Americans` wages are growing too slowly.

  • That`s not a good sign for the economy.

  • 2.2 percent --- that`s the growth in wages in January compared with last year,

  • just 2.2 percent, meager, paltry, blah.

  • It`s one of the numbers on Janet Yellen`s dashboard of about

  • a dozen indicators helping her decide

  • when the US economy will be able to withstand an interest rate hike.

  • Now, wages, it`s the one part of the labor market that has not improved.

  • It`s been very difficult for the average worker to feel the job market recovery,

  • because wages are not rising.

  • Will a tightening labor market mean wages will start to rise more briskly,

  • more like the 3 to 4 percent that`s ideal?

  • And that will give Janet Yellen more room to raise interest rates?

  • A bit of World War II history is next on CNN STUDENT NEWS.

  • Iwo Jima is a Japanese island located hundreds of miles south of the Japanese mainland

  • Its area is about eight square miles

  • and because it made for a strategically important air base in 1945,

  • Iwo Jima was the site of a vicious battle between Japan and and the invading US troops.

  • About 21,000 Japanese servicemen and almost 7,000 American servicemen

  • were killed in the battle for it.

  • A photograph snapped seven decades ago was a reminder of the hard-won American victory.

  • Seventy years ago, on February 23, 1945,

  • an American flag was raised on the island of Iwo Jima by the US Marines.

  • An Associated Press photographer, Joseph Rosenthal, captured the moment on film,

  • an image of five US Marines and a Navy Corpsman hoisting a large American flag

  • on the top of Mount Suribachi.

  • That photo would remain an iconic reminder of perseverance during World War II.

  • The image eventually became the US Marine Corps War Memorial

  • right outside of the nation`s capital

  • It was dedicated by Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th president of the United States.

  • The 32-foot tall bronze figures raise a 60-foot tall flagpole overlooking Washington, DC.

  • The 32-foot tall bronze figures raise a 60-foot tall flagpole overlooking Washington, DC.

  • "Uncommon valor was a common virtue" is inscribed on the monument.

  • It serves as a reminder from these brothers at arms that bravery was a common trait.

  • On yesterday`s transcript page at cnnstudentnews.com,

  • we received more than 1,000 requests for a mention on our Roll Call.

  • Here are three of them. Anoka Middle School for the Arts is in Anoka, Minnesota.

  • The Cyclones have our heads spinning.

  • Morrill Junior-Senior High School is in Morrill, Nebraska. The Lions are roar-some.

  • And Rinchon High School is in Tucson, Arizona.

  • The Rangers are at home on the range.

  • Shock grenades, tasers, rubber bullets ---

  • they`re in a unique class of weapons called non-lethal weapons,

  • to be used when a goal might include stunning a suspect or crowd control not using deadly force.

  • The US military has quietly added heat ray to this unique group.

  • The Pentagon has a heat ray. It`s invisible.

  • It`s silent. It`s real. But it`s not deadly.

  • Officially, it`s called the active denial system.

  • Here`s how the military says it works.

  • It shoots an invisible beam of intense electromagnetic waves at human targets

  • that penetrate the skin about 1/64 of an inch deep.

  • The beam creates what the military calls an intolerable heating sensation

  • that makes people instinctively move away from the beam.

  • The heat ray can reach a little more than half a mile away.

  • Its creators say it`s harmless and offers troops a non-lethal alternative

  • during threatening confrontations.

  • The active denial system can be used for crowd control,

  • securing a perimeter and protecting a convoy.

  • This technology has been around for a while,

  • more than a decade, but it`s been keeping a low profile.

  • The Marines have used it in training exercises.

  • In 2012, the military said the heat ray was available for operations worldwide,

  • but there were no current plans for deployment.

  • In the future, the heat ray may go portable.

  • The Pentagon wants to develop a smaller, lighter version, easier for troops to carry.

  • Wider use of unconventional ideas like the heat ray

  • may lead to more new weapons that protect troops without hurting civilians.

  • Just south of Boston, Massachusetts is the town of Braintree,

  • average annual snowfall, is, yes

  • , Boston gets about 47 inches in a normal year, so it`s a lot.

  • The job of shoveling snow is often shared in neighborhoods

  • and the subject of today`s Character Study lets nothing get in her way.

  • It started out of personal need.

  • So I started rolling down the sidewalk to get to the post office.

  • And I looked back and I saw a clear path.

  • And I was like, oh, I can clear the sidewalks for everybody.

  • Thirty-three-year-old Crystal Evans suffers from neuromuscular disease.

  • It didn`t stop her from starting a family or her own business, making party favors.

  • A little snow wasn`t going to slow her down.

  • With the shovel, I can put it down between my footrests and roll

  • with the chair and it just clears a path.

  • She spent over 100 hours since January making the sidewalks in her neighborhood passable,

  • inspiring volunteers to help out. Sunday, they cleared out this corner.

  • They were working down there when a man and his family drove by and said,

  • I`ll be right back, I`ve got a snowplow.

  • Not surprisingly, Evans is part of a movement ---

  • There we go.

  • --- pushing to change the international handicapped symbol

  • from a passive person in a wheelchair to somebody in action, taking charge.

  • There`s so much stigma of what people believe a disabled person is,

  • it`s --- they don`t expect us to be working. they don`t expect us to be out in the community.

  • In the community --- Now I`m all stocked up.

  • --- a vital part of it.

  • There are moms out here pushing strollers.

  • There are moms out here carrying infants on the icy sidewalks

  • because they cannot push a stroller.

  • There are elderly people that frequent

  • that bus stop because it`s near a grocery store, near a pharmacy.

  • It needs to be accessible for everybody.

  • A number of companies try to encourage creativity among employees.

  • A British design company wants them to have a ball.

  • It`s filled an entire office with them

  • --- 81,000 white balls to help employees think of the office

  • as more of a low pressure playground.

  • They say they`re more productive, refreshed and generally playful after spending some time in here.

  • It certainly seems like it could be good for business,

  • assuming you want your workers to have a well-rounded approach.

  • Despite rolling all over the place, they seem to be pretty grounded.

  • It`s great for rounds of brainstorming, making the daily rounds, rounding out a work day, you`ll circle back with us then.

  • and it brings today`s show full circle. We`ll be around again tomorrow.

  • Hope you`ll circle back with us then.

New technology is getting credit for saving lives

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February 25, 2015 - CNN Student News with subtitles

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