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  • -Rana, you got to interview-for the first time-the new chairman

  • of the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen. And when you came

  • back from the interview, I couldn't decide where I wanted

  • to start it with you, of whether I really most

  • cared about what kind of growth projection she sees for

  • this year or whether I wanted you to talk about

  • what it was like to interview her compared to other

  • comparable-if there any comparable figures who are men as opposed

  • to women. -Well, one of the obvious things to say

  • is that the only comparable figures are men. You know,

  • she's the first Fed chief in history that's a woman.

  • She's one of the few really, really top-of-the-pyramid academic economists

  • who's also had that level of a policy career. So

  • she's pretty singular. That said, she's kind of a den

  • mother to a whole group of slightly younger economist people

  • like Laura Tyson, Christy Romer. There are a lot of

  • people that look up to her. I actually look up

  • not only to her as an academic and a seer-she's

  • been the most accurate of the Fed governors in the

  • last five years-but also as a person. And people particularly

  • speak about her marriage to another- -So tell us about

  • that- -Yeah. -that-I didn't know until I read a-read your

  • piece-what an extraordinary partnership this is. -Totally extraordinary. Her husband,

  • George Akerlof, is a Nobel Prize-winning economist. He won through

  • his work on why markets are not as smart and

  • efficient is as we thought. He shared that honor with

  • Joe Stiglitz. And they have had these incredibly high-powered crews

  • running in tandem in different cities, which as-you know-as we

  • all know is a pretty hard thing to orchestrate. They've

  • informed each other. She says that George encourages her to

  • be more of an out-of-the-box thinker. -So one of the

  • debates that we had as we were putting together this

  • story was how we felt about calling her the most

  • powerful woman in the world, and Radhika, you had a

  • strong reaction to that. Can you talk about that? 'Cause

  • everything that you said sort of surprised me but made

  • me think differently about when and why and how we

  • should put those labels on people. -Well, I guess I

  • just didn't want to pigeon-hole her in a way. I

  • mean, it sounds like-it's such a lofty thing to call

  • someone, right, the most powerful woman in the world. But

  • I didn't want it to seem like we were singling

  • her out because of her sex. We're not writing about

  • her because she's a woman. We're writing about her because

  • she's a Fed chair and she's coming into this position

  • at a really pivotal time for the US economy and

  • she has really important and optimistic things to say about

  • it. I guess I just didn't want that kind of

  • line to distract from the very important message that she

  • has for our readers and for us. You know, we

  • assign those kinds of titles, the most powerful, most influential-often,

  • it speaks as much to the institution as to the

  • person and she is now a historic figure. I mean,

  • whatever happens in her ten years, she is a historic

  • figure. -The other interesting conversation which you got at a

  • bit in talking about this-their remarkable marriage and partnership goes

  • to the conversation that continues to be completely viral online

  • and certainly, you know, in conversations I have with other

  • women, which has to do with the choices women make,

  • the tradeoffs that they make. This conversation just-we never seem

  • to be tired of re-litigating the questions about leaning and

  • then leaning back and standing up and- -Falling over. -Sometimes.

  • -So, Callie, wonder-especially for younger women looking at this, does

  • this give you hope that, oh, it is possible to

  • be achieving at the highest level and have it all

  • or, gee, watch this and just say, this is hopeless

  • and I'm so tired of this conversation. It needs to

  • go away. -I think it's absolutely inspirational, seeing that Janet

  • Yellen said to Rana her husband contributed more than fifty

  • percent of his fair share in the housework is something

  • that I think women everywhere would just love to have.

  • -Uh huh. -I think that Janet Yellen represents someone who

  • is so different than Marissa Mayer and Sheryl Sandberg and

  • the cookie-cutter, personal brand image we have of women with

  • Twitter feeds who show us the inside of their lives.

  • Janet Yellen is someone who we don't know much about,

  • and we learned so much about her in Rana's story

  • that I think women would be so heartened to hear.

  • -And that I thought the most interesting anecdote in Rana's

  • piece was that when Larry Summers was considered the frontrunner,

  • she said to somebody, "Don't count me out." And I

  • thought that was a very interesting and revealing take. She

  • has full confidence in herself. She is someone who has

  • high ambition, and yet fortunately, we are not seeing her

  • being presented in the media as a cutthroat and conniving

  • woman. And that's something that's great to see. -Well, I

  • think there's no question that you don't get to be

  • the Fed chief without having a lot of ambition. On

  • the other hand, it's ambition for the right reasons. I

  • have gotten the sense through all the reporting I've done-and

  • I spoke to twenty different sources who have known her

  • over the years-that she has what economists would call a

  • revealed preference for being a central banker. I mean, she

  • has been at the Fed for thirty-six years in different

  • jobs. That said, her style is different than a lot

  • of people you see in Washington. She's not-as Laura Tyson

  • told me-"out there lauding her personal brand." She's not tweeting.

  • She's not in the Op-Ed page of the-Op-Ed pages of

  • the FT or the Wall Street Journal. But she's quietly

  • shaping a lot of thinking, and she's gonna be shaping

  • the future of the American economy.

-Rana, you got to interview-for the first time-the new chairman

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珍妮特-耶倫:世界上最有權力的女人? (Janet Yellen: World's Most Powerful Woman?)

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    林佳昀 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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