Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hello everyone, and welcome back to English  with Lucy. Today, I'm going to help you out  

  • with some doubts. We are going to talk about five  pairs or trios of very confusing English words,  

  • pairs of words that native speakers  struggle with too. Words like especially  

  • and specially, why are they so similar? Accept  and except. Assure, ensure, insure, inquire,  

  • enquire. Which ones do we use? I'm going to tell  you. Before we get started, I would just like to  

  • thank the sponsor of today's video. It is the  number one trusted European language school,  

  • Lingoda, with their language sprint. With the  sprint, you can learn to speak English confidently  

  • in just three months, gain 100% of your money  back, and get free access to the Cambridge  

  • online speaking test. You just need to take one  of their 24/7 classes every day for three months  

  • and get your course fees completely refunded. Click on the link in the description box to check  

  • the dates for this sprint. Be quick. If you miss  the deadline or the spaces are already filled,  

  • you will miss out. The super sprint offers  a 100% refund, and there is also the lighter  

  • regular sprint option, which offers a 50%  refund. You can join the sprint in English,  

  • French, German, Spanish, and business  English, from beginner to advanced level.  

  • I am really happy to share this opportunity with  you, because I've had firsthand experience of how  

  • effective the Lingoda language challenges can beThey've transformed many of my students' lives.  

  • They love Lingoda because they can interact in  small groups with amazing qualified teachers. Over  

  • 35,000 students have participated in previous  Lingoda language challenges, with many of them  

  • transforming their lives, overcoming their fear  of speaking, and becoming able to get new jobs.  

  • I secretly joined one of Lingoda's sprint  Facebook groups to see how everyone was  

  • getting on. And I was completely blown away by  the amount of students celebrating their refunds  

  • and their fluency transformations. So how can  you participate? Sign up for the sprint before  

  • the deadline and pay your deposit to secure your  spot. You can get €10 euros off by using my code,  

  • "WIN7". Lingoda will refund your tuition fee in  full if you attend the agreed number of classes  

  • within each sprint month by following the contest  rules. Remember, places in the sprint are limited.  

  • This is a language school, places  fill up. So you have the link in the  

  • description box. You have my €10 discount  code, "WIN7" what are you waiting for?  

  • Right, let's get started with the confusing  words. And to make this even easier for you,  

  • I have created a PDF worksheet. We've got  all of the words, their pronunciation,  

  • all of the information from the video, plus some  additional activities as well. Do bear in mind,  

  • this is a two-part video. You can also find  the second part in the description box. But  

  • the order doesn't matter. So the first one  we have, especially and specially. Especially  

  • means more with one person or thing than with  others, or more in particular circumstances  

  • than others. In my opinion, it's quite a hard  word to define. It's easier if you see it  

  • used in a sentence. For example, I love Sevilleespecially in the spring. So I love Seville in  

  • general, but I love it even more in the springOr, baby animals are cute, especially puppies.  

  • So I think all baby animals are cute, but  I really think that puppies are so cute,  

  • maybe that little bit more cute, that  little bit cuter. Now, specially means  

  • for a particular purpose or a particular personAn example, I made this cake specially for you.  

  • Now, here's the complicated bit. In British  English, we tend to use the two interchangeably.  

  • It can be really hard to hear the difference when  people speak. Specially tends to be less formal.  

  • And I think that part of the reason for this is  because it sounds like you are lazily dropping  

  • a syllable. I made this cake specially for youIt almost sounds like someone's trying to say,  

  • especially for you, but they're droppingsyllable. And actually, I would be inclined  

  • to say, I made this especially for you. And  that is something that you will hear a lot  

  • in British English. I made this cake especially  for you. I made this cake specially for you.  

  • So in general, in American English, they  differentiate between these words more. And  

  • in British English, we just use especially  in formal situations and specially in less  

  • formal situations. But really, it does depend on  the person and what they have grown up hearing.  

  • Number two, we have loose and lose. So there's  a big pronunciation difference here. Well,  

  • I say big. It's very subtle, but it is quite  important. Loose with the s at the end, and lose  

  • with z at the end. But they are minimal pairsThey only differ in one sound, that final  

  • phoneme z, s. Loose is an adjective meaning  not tight or not securely fixed. For example,  

  • I need to go to the dentist because my tooth is  loosed. It's not securely fixed into my mouth.  

  • Or I lost weight and now my clothes are  loose. They're not tight. They are loose.  

  • Now, to lose is a verb, meaning to  not be able to find something, or  

  • to fail to keep something as well. Examples, go  to the dentist before you lose your loose tooth.  

  • Before you lose (verb), your loose (adjective),  tooth. Or she wants to lose weight to make her  

  • clothes loose. She wants to lose (verb) weight to  make her clothes loose (adjective). It is very,  

  • very common to see people misspelling  these words and using the wrong one,  

  • so don't beat yourself up about it. I knowsay this a lot, but seriously, it's just not  

  • the end of the world. We will understand what  you're trying to say. Number three, we have  

  • accept and except. So with a, accept, we  use the schwa, accept. And with e, except,  

  • we use an e sound, except. Now in general, in  British English and modern received pronunciation,  

  • you will hear people just using the schwa for  both, except, except, except, except. When you  

  • speak quickly, you often find yourself using the  most convenient or efficient way of pronouncing  

  • something. So the schwa gets used a lot. Now, I'm going to use a and e for emphasis so that  

  • you know, which word I am referring to. Accept  is a verb, but except is usually a preposition  

  • or conjunction. It is sometimes a verb and I will  touch on that later. But accept as in to accept  

  • is to agree or to receive something if offeredAn example, I will not accept your apology,  

  • or I hope they accept the proposed changesNow let's look at except with the E,  

  • except. It generally means apart from or  excluding or with the exception of. An example,  

  • I study every day except Sundays, or we look  exactly the same, except my hair is darker.  

  • A little memory tip, the EX, ex of except can  be used to remind you that it is excluding,  

  • ex excluding. Now to except as a verb  with an E is very, very formal and it is  

  • rarely used. It means to not include something  or someone, you will usually see it in written  

  • English and I'll explain why. Look at this  sentence. Tours are arranged all year round,  

  • January excepted. Okay. So it's quite confusingif that sentence is said in spoken English.  

  • January excepted, is January accepted as in  they agree to it? Or is it excepted as in it  

  • is not included? When you see it written down, you  can see it means that it is excluded. January is  

  • not included. You won't come across this verb  very frequently. It's just another example of  

  • English being a pain in the neck. That's an idiom  meaning really annoying for accepted and excepted  

  • to mean the opposite, but to sound the  same. Oh, it's just so annoying.  

  • We have number four and this is a trio. We have  assure, ensure and insure, okay. So the last two  

  • have the same pronunciation ensure, insure. So  let's look at the three to assure with an A, is to  

  • remove someone's doubts. I assure you that I will  arrive on time. Don't worry, don't have any doubts  

  • I will arrive on time. To ensure with E N is to  guarantee or to make sure that something happens.  

  • I need to study to ensure that I pass my examSo assure and ensure a very similar, assure with  

  • an A, to remove someone's doubts and ensure with  E N is to guarantee that something will happen.  

  • To insure with I N, is to cover someone or  something like a house with an insurance policy.  

  • An example, the insurance company won't protect  my house against flooding. Now frustratingly  

  • some policies, some insurance policies also have  assurance policies as well, which just makes it so  

  • confusing, but let's not worry about that. We  know the basic differences between the three.  

  • Finally, we have number five, which is inquire  and enquire. The same pronunciation again, they  

  • have very similar meanings. Well actually they  mean the same thing, but sometimes they're used  

  • in different situations. So they both mean to ask  someone for information. Now in American English,  

  • once again, they have made this easier for youThey tend to favour inquire with I N, so enquire,  

  • you won't hear it as frequently in general. I'm  having to make a lot of generalisations here.  

  • However, the UK British English, we just  liked to make everything that little  

  • more complicated. Traditionally, to enquire  as in E N to enquire simply meant to ask,  

  • but inquire, I'm just using, in and en for  emphasis so you know which word I'm referring to.  

  • Inquire was used for formal investigations. Sowould enquire at a tourist information desk to see  

  • where the best ice cream shop was, but the police  or a court would inquire about something.  

  • However, nowadays both are used interchangeablySo people are just using words without knowing  

  • exactly what they mean, which is fine. I imagine  eventually we will end up just favouring one.  

  • I wonder if it will be inquire or enquiretime will tell probably. Right. That's it for  

  • today's lesson. There is also a part two to this  lesson, which I posted a week before this one.  

  • In that video, we discuss either or neither  or either or neither, we talk about the  

  • pronunciation and which one you should use. We  discuss to bring and to take, advise and advice,  

  • practise and practise, and also effect and affectwith E and with A. It's a very interesting lesson,  

  • if I do say so myself, and don't forget, I've made  all of this easier for you. I have created a free  

  • PDF for you to download. It's got all of these  confusing words, the pronunciation information,  

  • the clarifications, the examplesand also some additional activities  

  • that I think you'll really like. If you'd like to download that PDF,  

  • all you've got to do is sign up to my mailing  list. The link is in the description box  

  • and the PDF will be sent straight to your inboxDon't forget to check out Lingoda. The link for  

  • the sprint is in the description box as wellAnd you can use my code "WIN7" for 10 euros off.  

  • Don't forget to connect with me on all  of my social media. I've got my Facebook,  

  • my Instagram, my mailing list. I've also got my  personal blogging channel where I upload lots  

  • of subtitled, always fully subtitled blogs. So  you can use them as listening practise, they're  

  • all about my life in the English countrysideAnd I have just released my first ever course.  

  • It is a British English pronunciation coursewhere I teach modern received pronunciation.  

  • That is my accent. If you are interested in  that, the link is also in the description box,  

  • as well as a little good surprise. I  will see you soon for another lesson.  

  • Mwah!

Hello everyone, and welcome back to English  with Lucy. Today, I'm going to help you out  

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級 英國腔

不要再把這些詞搞混了!特別還是特別?Assure還是Ensure?查詢或詢問? (STOP confusing these words! Especially or Specially? Assure or Ensure? Inquire or Enquire?)

  • 156 11
    naomi 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字