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  • Japanese School Lunch Experience

  • Created and Produced by John Daub

  • Japanese schools have a reputation for serving up

  • some of the world's best lunches.

  • Japan has a very low child obesity rate

  • which made me wonder what kids are actually eating here.

  • Non-students can't eat at a Japanese elementary school so

  • I found the next best thing.

  • This is Kyushoku Toban which literally means

  • school lunch duty!”

  • It's a restaurant which serves authentic Japanese school lunches

  • and a great place to try out a lot of things.

  • Inside on the first floor,

  • it looks like a normal restaurant in Japan.

  • But if you go up to the second floor ... you're in for a surprise.

  • This is a Japanese school themed restaurant!

  • This place is really cool because it gives you a chance to eat

  • Japanese elementary school food

  • which we can't do normally because

  • we can't go to a Japanese elementary school.

  • and joining me on this report to help explain

  • the Japanese point of view is ...

  • GREAT!

  • Wow Look! That blackboard! This desk!

  • So nostalgic!

  • Oh, I'm sorry about that.

  • Hi, I'm Misato.

  • Misato!

  • The second floor is a 5th grade classroom

  • with a lot of the same interior items you find at many Japanese schools

  • from the wall clocks

  • to the small desks and backpacks

  • to the classroom duty wheel.

  • The menu has some photos

  • and there are recommended courses.

  • Misato and I places our order.

  • THE AMAZING JAPANESE AGEPAN (Sweet Bread)

  • The agepan or fried sweet baked bread is a Japanese school lunch regular

  • that is simple to make.

  • It starts with a plain long baked bun

  • that is placed in hot oil.

  • It's not dunked so it doesn't get saturated in oil.

  • It just floats there like a boat!

  • Flip it to cook the bottom.

  • Japanese school lunch calories are well regulated.

  • This entrée was developed right after World War 2

  • to increase the daily caloric intake of students

  • at an affordable price.

  • It's traditionally covered in sugar

  • and a topping like kinako, roasted soybean powder.

  • To older Japanese, it's a nostalgic food they can share with their kids

  • and still on many school lunch menus today.

  • Kubota-san and the staff prepare our order.

  • At Japanese schools, everyone eats the same thing.

  • Kids don't have a choice,

  • but here, there's a menu and they've got to be ready for any order.

  • They sometimes have regional school foods off menu

  • so ask if you're curious about something.

  • Rice, miso soup, noodles, meat sauce and curry or stew.

  • The order is placed on a tray and taken to us on the second floor classroom.

  • The classroom was starting to smell a whole lot better!

  • Before eating, you have to do one important thing.

  • Say ITADAKIMASU or Bon Appetit!

  • ITADAKIMASU

  • So, what's the deal with Japanese school lunches?

  • The Japanese School Lunch program started in 1954 nationwide.

  • Before that, kids brought a bento to school.

  • Caloric intake and nutrition value is regulated for every scheduled meal.

  • Kids can't chose what they want to eat.

  • Everyone eats the same thing.

  • If they hate something, you still have to eat it

  • or stay until you do.

  • There's no cafetreria in Japanese elementary schools.

  • Kids eat in the classroom

  • and there's no sushi, for safety reasons.

  • Milk is served with every meal.

  • Meals are paid for each month by parents

  • which usually cost around $40 to $60 a month.

  • Nearly all ingredients are locally produced

  • with meals usually made from scratch.

  • Learning about nutrition starts with what kids eat in their own lunches.

  • Are your schools the same way?

  • Here's the ultimate school lunch!

  • A little of everything.

  • Soup, meat sauce, curry stew, salad, and noodles with agepan and milk.

  • These noodles are called SOFTMEN.

  • Curry rice is a school lunch favorite.

  • A side of miso soup.

  • Here's one with a pasta salad,

  • vegetable soup and rice with furikake flavoring.

  • and agepan, of course.

  • Furikake here is seaweed, a little salt and sesame.

  • Here, the softmen is accompanied by meat sauce and a salad.

  • Here's a controversial one. Whale.

  • It's not served these days in schools

  • but it's possible to get a little here.

  • Whale was cheaper than beef and chicken

  • and could feed thousands, nothing ever wasted.

  • A frozen mikan orange for dessert.

  • Kids sometimes cant use chopsticks so

  • there's a SPORK!

  • Who doesn't love a spork.

  • SCHOOL LUNCH TASTE TEST

  • Wow! Check this out!

  • So what do you think of Japanese school lunch?

  • This looks really good!

  • So this is an authentic Japanese lunch.

  • This looks like the real thing, right?

  • It's really similar!

  • Misato has softmen and meat sauce with dessert.

  • What's this?

  • Well, it's called softmen. Ramen? Softmen.

  • What's different about it?

  • Well

  • The one I remember eating was a little thicker

  • but it's not udon. It's not ramen.

  • It's kind of unusual.

  • It's softmen.

  • I love softmen!

  • It comes cooked in the pack.

  • Misato likes to cut it up with her fingers,

  • smooshing it like this

  • then eating it in the meat sauce.

  • After she divides it up, she opens the pack.

  • Her style is to eat it directly out of it like this.

  • Dip it in the sauce. Cover it really good.

  • To get more sauce, open up the softmen like this.

  • And eat!

  • Of course it's good!

  • Maybe even better than spaghetti?

  • I've gotten into a little trouble with mine.

  • Agepan is a main dishand it's a little messy.

  • I can imagine kids everywhere have the same problem.

  • Your mouth is filthy, isn't it?

  • Agepan is just filled with sugar!

  • and Kinako!

  • But when it's loaded with kinako. it's super good!

  • Yeah, it IS really good but it just doesn't seem healthy to me.

  • Mine came with a curry stew and salad. I'm confused.

  • Is agepan the dessert?!

  • It's dessert, right?

  • No, it's not!

  • Come on! It's like a donut!

  • It;s got sugar, kinako, fried bread ...

  • It's dessert!

  • So you eat dessert first?

  • Agepan isn't dessert (you fool!)

  • It's food. The main course.

  • Really?

  • I'm started to like Japanese school.

  • There's the milk.

  • It's served in glass bottles here but in schools,

  • it comes in cartons.

  • On special days, kids got this flavored powder.

  • I chose strawberry over caramel, coffee and chocolate.

  • Simple put it in the milk like this

  • and stir it until it turns pink.

  • Delicious?

  • Yes, delicious!

  • Delicious!

  • All in all, a great lunch!

  • It really was a unique experience to eat a school lunch

  • in a classroom like this.

  • ASK MY JAPANESE NEIGHBOR

  • Hello.

  • Mr Seiichi is my 96 year old neighbor

  • and I came to ask him what he ate as a student

  • before World War 2.

  • Noriben (Roasted Seaweed Lunchbox)

  • This is a convenient store noriben.

  • Rice, a little soy sauce and fish flake with roasted seaweed on top.

  • Today's noriben comes with luxurious fried foods on top,

  • not the noriben Mr Seiichi's ate in his school days.

  • It starts with rice

  • then top it with seaweed

  • Katsuobushi (fish flakes) on top

  • then add another layer of seaweed.

  • They didn't have a school lunch?

  • That's right. They didn't have it.

  • School lunches started after the war.

  • Before, we had a big piece of seaweed

  • roasted, put it in the box

  • then a layer of rice on that

  • and another piece of seaweed.

  • What did you drink?

  • Did you drink milk?

  • Milk?

  • No! No! No! No! No!

  • Milk was a luxury item

  • Did you eat a noriben everyday?

  • I think so. Everyday, yes.

  • Because other things

  • we just didn't have it.

  • (We didn't have many) things to eat.

  • So you only had noriben for lunch.

  • Well, we also had sardines. Iwashi.

  • We had sardines

  • That's about it.

  • The sardines were dried.

  • Did you eat any vegetables?

  • Vegetableswell, they were expensive.

  • Back in the day, bentos were prepared in metal boxes

  • which roasted on top of the old daruma stoves.

  • In the classroom, you could smell the bentos.

  • There were so many of them!

  • Probably smelled so good, right?

  • It really did.

  • Next to recess, school lunches are the best part of any kids day

  • and that's what Kyushoku toban is all about.

  • Those smiles.

  • Food brings people together no matter your age.

  • Kubota-san has been working here for a long time

  • and I wanted to know the recipe to its success.

  • School luncheswhen we were

  • elementary and junior high school students

  • everyone had a lot of fun.

  • At the time, everyone ate with a smile.

  • From that. we wanted to make this place.

  • I have to agree.

  • I can now see what makes Japanese school lunches so amazing.

  • If you want to be a Japanese student again

  • or let's say a transfer student from a place far away,

  • this is where you can experience it a little

  • and have a great lunch too.

  • Next time: The Japanese Manhole Uncovered

  • I go to a factory to see how they are made

  • and why they have such designs.

  • We go all over the country.

  • Thank you so much for watching. If you

  • liked it, hit that SUBSCRIBE BUTTON :)

  • and watch another one of ONLY in JAPAN's shows.

  • Produced by John Daub

  • Follow me on Instagram: onlyinjapantv

Japanese School Lunch Experience

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世界上最好的學校午餐★只在日本。 (World's Best School Lunch ★ ONLY in JAPAN)

  • 3 2
    Summer 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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