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  • a lot of the times Japanese people will not criticize you and directly they will work their way around it and you have to read between the lines.

  • Hello, everyone.

  • Welcome back to my channel, your home away from home.

  • We are coming from my Japanese apartment in Tokyo, Japan, and today I'm going to be talking about a topic that some people are probably wondering, especially before they come to Japan.

  • This all kind of talks about a Japanese person's way of life and personality and customs and everything like that.

  • So I thought this would be a very interesting topic to touch on.

  • So the way Japanese people think they do have words for certain things, whereas like in America, we don't really have words for ways of thinking.

  • But in Japan they do have terms for them.

  • So I thought I'd be really interesting to kind of tackle those things.

  • So if you guys are planning to move to Japan, you kind of understand where a Japanese person is coming from when they act a certain way, so we're just gonna jump right into the video.

  • The first way of thinking is gum, but day so gone but the culture is basically do your best, so it's kind of like good luck gun, but they means good luck.

  • So if you're trying to cheer somebody on, you'll say Outcome but day or something like that.

  • So gum.

  • But day culture, I guess you could say, is just that mindset of always, always, always doing your best.

  • Japan has a respect for pushing someone to do their best.

  • That's gonna be seen in the way people work or if they're carrying something or doing some kind of physical labor or whatever else that involves a lot of thinking or strength, sometimes the gun.

  • But that culture can go a little bit too far where you know a boss will tell somebody to do work, and they might work overtime or work too much and they'll say gun.

  • But they do your best and you always feel like you are pressured to do your best instead of kind of stepping back and taking a break.

  • The Japanese culture that has a huge work culture, so people are always working, working, working, so there's a positive side and there's a negative side to that way of thinking another way of thinking is something called Sheldon I.

  • So people will say, Ah, Sheldon I, which means it can't be helped.

  • It's a philosophy that some things are just out of your control.

  • This is a mindset that's in a lot of other cultures, so it's like you shouldn't worry about it.

  • There's nothing you can do about it sort of thing.

  • So you'll hear.

  • A lot of people say Ashok and I, which means it just can't be helped.

  • Don't worry about it, but it also can explain a disinterest in something so like politics.

  • It can also be a negative thing as well, so there's always a negative and a positive thing when it comes to certain ways of thinking in Japan.

  • But she organize one of them, and we use that language all the time when there's something that can't be helped in the workplace, or whatever better way to think about this is in Japan, they think if something can't be helped, it's better to accept it and to move forward.

  • So it's kind of also away that Japanese people deal with very difficult situations, like disasters or something like that.

  • The Japanese tend to not complain, so much, so that's part of the show.

  • But I mindset and way of thinking.

  • And it's how they get over certain things, like in the past how they got over the war.

  • Just don't complain except it do your best move forward.

  • So another way of thinking is kind of a problem now in Japan, and it's called GT and Ninja, so it basically means duty and emotion.

  • So, for example, a convenience store worker might have to deal with a very difficult customer or somebody at a storehouse, a deal with a very difficult customer.

  • And they tend to hide their emotions even if they feel angry or upset.

  • They hide their emotions and don't say anything, because there is that idea that duty comes first.

  • Or a housewife housewife has the duty of taking care of the kids and cooking for the man and all that stuff, even in our time, like back in the day.

  • That was what a woman's role is, Even if she's unhappy or doesn't feel good about it.

  • That's just the way of life.

  • So that kind of goes hand in hand with Sheldon I mindset and the gun, but a mindset I think Japan.

  • It's more of a thing.

  • A lot of people are just very unhappy with their work or their job, and then they don't speak up or say anything to their boss to make their environment or their workplace better there, too afraid to quit.

  • They're too afraid to leave.

  • They feel like the duty of their position comes first before they're feeling.

  • So a lot of people suppress their feelings, press their emotions.

  • If you notice when you come to Japan, a lot of people are very robotic at stores or, you know, wherever you go and there's a service, there is a very robotic way of talking and communicating with the customer.

  • There's set things that they have to say, and even if they're having a really bad day, they're always they never show it.

  • And you'll never realize In Japan I feel like they're really good at hiding their emotions here.

  • Okay, this is something that's going to come up a lot in Japan.

  • It's called multi night, so multi multi ni means what a waste.

  • It's a feeling of regret about wasting something in Japan.

  • There's tons of different art styles where they mend broken things.

  • For example, if a pot is broken, they'll try to make it more beautiful by putting it together with gold.

  • It's called King Su Gi, so putting things together with gold to make it become more beautiful instead of wasting it and throwing, throwing it away.

  • Now I have an opinion about this.

  • So in Japan, if you walk into apartment of a Japanese person, you may find some of their apartments and homes seem very clean.

  • But most of the time I've noticed that a lot of Japanese people keep things or don't throw things away.

  • That could be because of, you know, the rules of throwing things away.

  • It's very Mendel Qusai, which means it's very bothersome to throw things away in this country because you have to sort everything.

  • That could be why.

  • But a lot of people tend to save a lot of things because it's multi ni if you throw everything away, that's how Japanese apartments or houses becomes so cluttered.

  • And there's a lot of hoarding here.

  • But it can also B for situation, so if you don't take an opportunity or or again, if you don't work hard enough to get to a specific spot in the company or something like that.

  • It's just multi night.

  • It's a waste if you don't work hard.

  • It's a waste if you don't take this opportunity, it's a waste if you don't do that.

  • So they have a strong multi ni mindset in Japan.

  • You'll hear a lot amongst Japanese co workers and things like that, like Oh, this is multi ni or this product is multi and I don't throw it away.

  • We can keep it.

  • We can use it for something else.

  • Yahoo, Doshi There's a lot of ways of thinking when it comes to good luck or gods or, you know, religion.

  • In Japan, A lot of Japanese people don't really have religion, but you'll see a lot of people that kind of follow Shintoism or Buddhism or a mix of the two.

  • Yeah, Kudo.

  • She is a superstition in Japan, where certain ages are unlucky.

  • Most people don't take that very seriously, but some people do so they gather a lot of good luck terms that shrines and everything.

  • Teoh, you know, keep themselves healthy and in good luck for the year because that certain ages unlucky.

  • So the yak ago she years for men, our 25 42 61.

  • For women, the unlucky years are 1933 and 37 co I.

  • That's pretty self explanatory.

  • Japan likes to look at things, is very cute to see a lot of characters in the train station.

  • Everything has a mascot in Japan, a very cute mascot.

  • So the colli culture is alive and thriving in the world of Japan.

  • So if you see a lot of people dressed in cute colors or dressed very childlike sometimes or you see a lot of cartoons at the train station or on advertisements or something, it's just that Coe mindset and culture in Japan.

  • This is another way of thinking that goes hand in hand with some other mindsets and ways of thinking that I mentioned before.

  • It's called Hold on a and Tough a Mayan.

  • It can be translated as true opinion and public face.

  • So it's the idea of hiding your true feelings and your opinion inside just to save face.

  • A lot of the times Japanese people will not criticize you directly.

  • They will work their way around it, and you have to read between the lines That's how it always has been in my experience here in Japan.

  • They will not directly tell you if you're doing something wrong or criticize you in a very straightforward way.

  • They're not very straightforward in Japan, so they kind of tried to explain to you that you're doing something wrong in a different way.

  • That doesn't make any sense.

  • So I think that's a big problem for people that live here, especially foreigners.

  • They don't understand that.

  • That is just a huge way of thinking and a way of explaining things.

  • Here in Japan, I used to work at a board of education office, and that's just how they dealt with things.

  • And ah, lot of the times it was would cause a lot of confusion.

  • People wouldn't really speak up if they have questions.

  • I just feel like it's It's a very big issue and causes a lot of misunderstandings in Japan, but that's just how they work and how they do things.

  • Muldano Awada is the idea that things are more attractive or beautiful when they don't last, so things like cherry blossoms they only bloom once a year in a certain time of years, so they're very attractive and very beautiful.

  • And it's just that idea that the things that don't last for a long time or you don't that are very rare to see is very beautiful.

  • So Japanese people say it's got some of us thought when you worked very hard or to end the day.

  • So at work you'll hear a lot of people say it's got Osama or what Scotty Samad esta, which means all you did a good job today.

  • You worked really hard.

  • So I feel like it's another way of thinking where people have to work hard and put a lot of pressure on themselves.

  • But it also is a very good compliment in Japan.

  • So always when you come to Japan after a long day of work, they will study some of that style.

  • You did a great job today.

  • You worked very hard hostile, not a spacesuit, which means personal space in Japanese, so the Japanese value their personal space.

  • If you're someone that's very introverted, this may be the country for you because personal space is of value here, especially if you're like, standing in line or, you know, waiting for something.

  • A lot of people don't talk to other people or strangers, whereas, like in America, you'll see a lot of other people chatting while they're waiting is a couple ways that Japanese people tend to express their own personal bubble, one with masks.

  • So wearing Maso.

  • A lot of people wear masks, not even when they're sick, but when they want to hide their face.

  • Or they want some space that they don't want to be bothered.

  • Some girls wear it when they don't wear makeup, so masks are a huge indication that person needs some personal space.

  • Manga cafes.

  • There's a lot of, um, comic book cafes that people you know take naps in or need some time alone and go there and spend like 1000 years or $10 just to have some alone time or space.

  • Thank you guys for watching.

  • If you enjoyed this video, give it a thumbs up.

  • The Japanese really definitely have a different mindset and way of thinking and doing things, and you just have to be very accepting and carrying an understanding if you want to live here because it's gonna be a whole different ballgame.

  • When you move to this country, it's going to be very different from your own culture, and I feel like when I moved here, that's exactly how I felt.

  • You pick up on these things in the beginning, and then you just get used to them as you go along.

  • And that's just And then you start to adopt these things yourself and you don't even realize it.

  • But there's some ways of thinking that do need to change here in Japan.

  • That put a lot of pressure and other people.

  • That's just my opinion.

  • I don't know what you guys think.

  • Please comment on below.

  • And don't forget to subscribe and hit the bell icon for notifications.

  • If you're new here, thank you guys for watching.

  • And I'll see you guys next time.

  • Bye.

a lot of the times Japanese people will not criticize you and directly they will work their way around it and you have to read between the lines.

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日本人是怎麼想的? (How Japanese People Think ?)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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