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  • SPEAKER: And welcome to your Week 2 video tutorial.

  • This week we're going to be talking about the concept

  • of an artifact.

  • For your upcoming assignments in Humanities 100,

  • you're going to be choosing a number of artifacts

  • that you'll be discussing in more detail.

  • And as far as the definition of it

  • goes and as far as the purposes of our Humanities 100 course,

  • there's a specific way we want you

  • to think about this concept of an artifact.

  • You've got some readings, of course, the new materials

  • in Blackboard to help you define the term artifact more clearly.

  • But we also wanted to give you a quick tutorial

  • to clarify, as well.

  • So again, for the purposes of our Humanities 100 course,

  • when defining an artifact you want

  • to think of two main elements of that definition.

  • That first element is that it must

  • be something that is man-made.

  • So it's not something that's naturally occurring or found

  • in nature.

  • It has to be created by man.

  • So it can be a physical object.

  • It can be one of the more traditional

  • creative visual works of art like a painting, a building,

  • a statue, even a photograph, something

  • that you can actually hold.

  • Or it can be an intangible creation--

  • so a song, a dance, a choreographed performance,

  • a television show, again these aren't

  • things that are tangible, they're not physical,

  • but they are created by man.

  • Secondly, an artifact should not be primarily

  • functional or practical.

  • Its main purpose is not to create a function

  • or to result in a particular function.

  • It is more of that creative expression

  • that we're thinking about here.

  • So it should have some artistic qualities to it.

  • It should embody creative expression

  • in one way or another.

  • And it should present individual ideas.

  • So simply an object that performs a function or purpose

  • like a chair or a table, while it might be beautiful

  • or beautifully made, it's not necessarily an artifact

  • because its primary function is to perform for an individual

  • or to create a utilitarian purpose.

  • So some examples-- we think about a seashell

  • that's found on the beach.

  • Yes, it's beautiful.

  • We can admire it.

  • But it's not an artifact.

  • Again, it's not man-made.

  • This is something that's natural found in the world

  • without our having to create it.

  • However, a necklace or another kind

  • of adornment or work of artistic expression that uses a seashell

  • or seashells would be considered an artifact.

  • Because while the seashell itself is not an artifact,

  • the necklace or the adornment that's created with it

  • is created by man and therefore falls

  • into the definition of artifact.

  • Another example, a smartphone-- again,

  • this seems like it would be an artifact.

  • It's man-made.

  • And there's definitely a case to be made for it being something

  • that's beautiful.

  • But a smartphone itself is not an artifact. ,

  • Because its main purpose is something beyond just being

  • a visual or aesthetic element for us to look at or to think

  • about creatively.

  • It has more purposes that are more at the forefront--

  • communication, posting onto the web,

  • those kind of technological elements to it.

  • However, we can find artifacts that

  • deal with the concept of a smartphone.

  • So Eric Pickersgill's Removed photographic series

  • of photographs that he made where

  • he's looking at the affect of smartphones on us

  • as a culture--

  • these are creative expressions by the artist himself

  • thinking about the concept of the cell

  • phone or the smartphone.

  • So these photographs and this series of photographs

  • would be considered an artifact, because it's

  • a creative expression created by man that

  • brings in individual ideas.

  • And its primary function is not that

  • of what the smartphone is for, but it's

  • for getting us to think or getting us to reflect

  • on the ideas of an artifact.

  • I also wanted to remind you of the difference

  • between an artifact and a symbol--

  • one that a lot of students think of is the idea of Uncle Sam.

  • The simple concept of Uncle Sam would not

  • be considered an artifact when we think about it.

  • It's an idea.

  • It's a symbol.

  • It became a symbol or a personification

  • of the United States based off of an actual man.

  • But the idea of Uncle Sam, in itself, is not an artifact.

  • However, if you wanted to focus on a work like James Montgomery

  • Flagg's poster for the army, I Want You For US Army,

  • that features this image of Uncle Sam,

  • then that itself, the poster itself, the work

  • created by Flagg would be considered an artifact.

  • So again, you can kind of see the difference here

  • that just the concept of Uncle Sam or saying that you're

  • going to choose quote, unquote, "Uncle Sam" as your artifact

  • would not qualify as an artifact because it's an idea.

  • Whereas an actual creation of a work like the I Want You

  • poster by Flagg would be considered an artifact.

SPEAKER: And welcome to your Week 2 video tutorial.

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B1 中級 美國腔

第二週--HUM100:什麼是藝術品?- CC (Week 2 - HUM100: What is An Artifact? - CC)

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    Caurora 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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