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  • Hi, Bob the Canadian here.

  • Welcome to this English lesson about age

  • and how to talk about age in English.

  • Soon, it will be my birthday.

  • I usually don't give the exact date,

  • and I usually don't say my exact age,

  • but let's just say that later this summer,

  • I will have a birthday and I will still be in my late 40s.

  • But because my birthday is coming up,

  • I thought I should do a lesson

  • on how to talk about age in English.

  • So do watch the whole lesson.

  • I'm going to start with the basics,

  • and then I'm gonna progress

  • through some intermediate vocabulary and phrases

  • that you can use to talk about age in English.

  • And then I will give you some more advanced phrases

  • and some more advanced vocabulary towards the end

  • of the video.

  • So stick around. Practice the basics.

  • Maybe learn something new in this English lesson

  • about how to talk about your age

  • and the age of other people.

  • (light music)

  • Well, welcome to this English lesson

  • about how to talk about age in English.

  • Before we get started, though,

  • if this is your first time here,

  • don't forget to click that red Subscribe button below

  • and give me a thumbs up if this video

  • helps you learn just a little bit more English.

  • But let's start the lesson.

  • Let's start with the basics.

  • In English, when you say how old you are,

  • you say, "I am," and then the age.

  • So if you are 25, you say, "I am 25."

  • I know in other languages,

  • you use the equivalent of our verb to have.

  • We do not do this in English.

  • In English, you would not say,

  • "I have 25 years."

  • Do not say that.

  • In English, you would say, "I am 25 years old,"

  • or, "I am 25," or, "I'm 25."

  • And the same goes for when you ask someone

  • how old they are in English.

  • You don't say, "How many years do you have?"

  • You say, "How old are you?"

  • So in English, a little bit different than some languages.

  • You definitely say things like, "I am 25."

  • And if you ask the question, you say, "How old are you?"

  • But let me talk about that for a sec.

  • With kids, it is okay to say, "How old are you?"

  • With adults, though, it's kind of a private

  • and personal question.

  • And you normally wouldn't ask it,

  • except for on a certain day of the year.

  • And that day is their birthday.

  • A person's birthday, when they are an adult,

  • is really the only day where it's okay to ask them

  • how old they are.

  • You could say, "Hey, how old are you today?"

  • "So how old are you turning today?"

  • So for instance, later, when it's my birthday,

  • people will come over and say, "Happy birthday."

  • We will have a birthday cake with candles,

  • and people will feel like it's okay

  • to ask a very private question.

  • They'll say, "Hey, how old are you?"

  • And I will respond and say, "I'm in my late 40s."

  • (laughing) No, but seriously, though,

  • in English, you can ask children how old they are

  • almost at any point.

  • So if you are visiting your brother and sister-in-law

  • and they have a child, your nephew or niece,

  • you could say, "Hey, how old are you now?"

  • And that is totally fine.

  • But you rarely ask people who are adults in English

  • how old they are.

  • It's kind of a private question.

  • So wait for their birthday.

  • If you get invited over to their birthday party,

  • you can then say, "Hey, how old are you?"

  • Oh and one more thing about birthdays.

  • We use two different phrases

  • to talk about how old you are going to become

  • on your birthday.

  • We would say, "I am going to be," and then the age.

  • So let's say later this summer,

  • I was going to be 25.

  • I would say, "Oh, on my birthday, I'm going to be 25,"

  • or, "On my birthday, I'm going to turn 25."

  • We should for a minute go over

  • all of the terms we use to describe different ages

  • that people are.

  • When you are first born, we call you a newborn.

  • A newborn is someone who is just a few months old.

  • You could also call a newborn a baby,

  • but definitely, a newborn is a person who is just born

  • and is probably only a month or two old.

  • After that, we would just call you a baby

  • for a little while.

  • Once a baby is old enough that they start to crawl and walk,

  • usually when they start to walk,

  • we start to call them a toddler.

  • So a toddler is a young, young, young child

  • who is learning to walk or who has recently learned to walk.

  • After that, we just refer to you as a kid or child.

  • Someone between the age of three and four and maybe 10,

  • we would just call them a child or a kid.

  • And then we have this term now tween.

  • It's not a real word, but a tween is someone

  • who isn't a child anymore but isn't a teenager.

  • They're kind of between those two ages,

  • and we will sometimes call them a tween.

  • So a tween is like someone who is 10 or 11 or 12 years old.

  • Once you turn 13, you see the teen in the number 13.

  • Anyone from the age of 13 to 19 is called a teenager.

  • Teenagers are young and carefree.

  • That would be a good description for them.

  • At least that's what I was like when I was a teenager.

  • Once you turn 20, we would probably refer to you

  • as a young adult.

  • Anyone who is from the age of 20 to about 30,

  • we would call a young adult.

  • Anyone from the age of 30 to about 45,

  • we would refer to as an adult.

  • And then if you are age 45 to 60, maybe 65,

  • we would say that you are middle-aged

  • and you might also hear people describe that age

  • as being middle age with no D on the end.

  • I think the most correct term is to say

  • that you are middle-aged.

  • I'm middle-aged, by the way.

  • I am a middle-aged man. (laughing)

  • I should just admit it.

  • Once you are 60 to 65, we would start to call you a senior.

  • Some people are seniors at the age of 55.

  • It really just depends where you live.

  • But if you are close to retirement or retired,

  • we would call you a senior.

  • And then if you are older than that,

  • we now are starting to call people

  • who are very old elderly.

  • So an elderly person would be someone

  • maybe over the age of 70 or over the age of 75.

  • So those are all of your terms.

  • I hope that helped you get a better sense

  • of how we describe the general ages

  • of different groups of people as they get older.

  • We should talk a little bit too

  • about how to compare yourself in age to someone else.

  • So we have terms like younger and older

  • or youngest and oldest.

  • When you are older than someone,

  • it means that you were born before them.

  • If you are younger than someone,

  • you were born later than them.

  • And this is how we compare our age to different people.

  • In my family, I have an older brother

  • and an older sister and a younger brother

  • and a younger sister.

  • So you can see how I used those words

  • to compare our ages.

  • My brother is the oldest,

  • and my other brother is the youngest.

  • So that means they are at the top of the family

  • or at the end of the family.

  • Should I have said the beginning of the family?

  • Maybe I should've.

  • And then lastly, I just wanted to talk

  • about another term.

  • I am a middle child.

  • So when you are not the oldest

  • and you are not the youngest,

  • and if you are in a family of three or five,

  • you are perfectly in the middle in terms of age,

  • and we would refer to you as the middle child.

  • Sometimes if you are in a family of four

  • and you are the second or third oldest,

  • we would describe you as middle children as well.

  • But I, in my family, I am definitely the middle child.

  • I am the middle child of five kids.

  • Of course, we're all adults now,

  • but I'm still the middle child and I still act like one.

  • We should also look at some intermediate phrases

  • or some intermediate terms for talking about peoples' age.

  • In particular, I wanna talk about generalizations.

  • So if you don't know exactly how old someone is,

  • you might say that they are in their 20s

  • or they are in their 30s or in their 40s.

  • So for instance, I have a cousin

  • and I'm not sure exactly how old he is,

  • but I know that he's in his 30s.

  • So when you don't know the exact age of someone,

  • you can use that term.

  • We can also be a little more specific.

  • You could say, "I think he's in his early 30s,"

  • or you could say, "I think he's in his mid 30s,"

  • or you could say, "I think he's in his late 30s."

  • You'll often hear me describe my age

  • as that I am in my late 40s.

  • So those are ways that you can be less specific,

  • where you can talk about age

  • when you don't know the exact age.

  • You can also use these generalized terms for age

  • to talk about yourself.

  • You can say things like,

  • "Oh, when I was in my early 30s, I used to go out more."

  • Or you could say, "Later in life when I am in my 60s,

  • I am going to relax a little bit more."

  • So these are all just general terms

  • that you can talk about your age

  • or that you can use to talk about the age of someone else

  • where you don't want to be specific,

  • or maybe you just don't know what age the person is.

  • So let's talk about some more advanced phrases

  • when we are talking about age.

  • The first phrase I wanna talk about is the phrase

  • getting on in years.

  • If you describe someone as getting on in years,

  • it means that they're getting older.

  • The second phrase I wanted to talk about is over the hill.

  • If someone is over the hill,

  • it usually means they are over the age of 40.

  • So I'm definitely over the hill.

  • Another phrase I wanted to look at

  • is the phrase midlife crisis.

  • A midlife crisis is when you get around age 40 or 45

  • and you start to kind of second-guess your life.

  • You start to wonder if you chose the right career.

  • Did you choose the right path in life?

  • And you start to worry about it

  • and you have a little bit of anxiety about it.

  • We would call that a midlife crisis.

  • Another phrase you'll hear in English

  • is that somebody is turning grey.

  • You can see that my hair is turning grey.

  • When we say that someone is turning grey,

  • we are just simply saying that they are getting older.

  • When you talk about people who are a lot younger than you,

  • you can use the general term young people.

  • So you'll sometimes hear someone say,

  • "You know, young people these days,

  • they just aren't as serious as we were when we were young."

  • And you might also hear people use the word youth.

  • They might say, "Youth these days just aren't as serious