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  • Hi I'm Joel and I'm Lia and today we have got an English accent lesson. Before we get

  • started, don't forget to click subscribe on our channel for future content and don't forget

  • to press the bell. So why is English accent training so important? Firstly, wherever you

  • go in life, the first thing anybody will take from you, or absorb from you is the way you

  • speak. It's your first impression really, or second impression, first is what you look

  • like, but then second impression is what you sound like. And often people will be quick

  • to judge you, before they get to know you. So in my experience, out of all the English

  • accents, whether that's American English, Australian English, or Northern or Southern

  • English, the Southern English accent, so a Neutral or Standard English accent is seen

  • as the most prestigious, the most reliable, the most educated... just well-respected accent

  • to have. Mainstream media used to be populated entirely by this accent. Which is why it's

  • known in some circles as 'BBC English accent' because the BBC (British Broadcasting Company)

  • in the UK, only used to hire people with our sorts of accents. Now that's not the case,

  • they hire people with all sorts of accents, but back in the day, they only hired 'us'

  • (people like us) because our accent was seen as the most educated and the right way to

  • speak. Following that, it would be unusual if you were learning English in anything other

  • than this accent. I would find it quite unusual if I spoke to someone who had English as their

  • second language, but they spoken with a regional accent. Yeah, I've never seen anyone learn

  • English in a Liverpudlian accent. Or in a Bristol accent. Like, it just doesn't happen.

  • It would be bizarre. It would be really weird. I think it's either American English, isn't

  • it? Or just British English, but by 'British English' meaning Southern British English.

  • Essentially, the easiest way to sound more British is to consume as much British content

  • as possible. When you're learning a new language they say the best thing to do is to move to

  • that place and absorb yourself in that environment, and I think that applies to accents as well.

  • Absorb yourself with that accent, listen to as many British English people as you can.

  • Don't listen to people with loads of different regional accents, listen to one type of accent.

  • So, Southern British accents, Southern English accents, RP, Standard English, they all mean

  • the same thing. And I think we get a lot of people messaging us saying "how can I improve

  • my English I really want to be better" and the simple answer is: you just have to absolutely

  • commit to this and commit and make a decision that you are only going to speak English,

  • you know, if you're coming here, I'm only going to speak English, I'm only going to

  • be around English speaking natives. And as soon as you make that promise to yourself,

  • your English will improve, 100%. But if you're just going to be.... it's never going to happen.

  • Half-hearted. You can't half-heartedly try to do anything. Because you won't see the

  • results. But I get people messaging me on Instagram saying "I've learnt so much from

  • your channel, you've really helped me improve my English, how can I be even better?". No

  • course that you enrol on is going to do it for you. You just have to do it for yourself.

  • And you're in the best place possible to do that... Joel & Lia's YouTube Channel! But

  • I mean, as well as us, you're living in the age of the internet, where you can watch as

  • much content as you want as possible, for free! No longer do you have to go and pay

  • £100 an hour to go and see an accent coach, or and English teacher, you've got all the

  • lessons for free on the internet. So you're welcome! You're welcome! Kidding! When you're

  • in the UK go and watch theatre, don't sit at home watching too many films, because everything

  • you're hearing is American English. If you're getting confused and you can't really tell

  • the difference between what you're hearing in Hollywood films and the way that Joel and

  • I are speaking then you really need to listen closely and just watch British people if you

  • want to improve your British English. Exactly, if you want to learn American English, absolutely

  • fine, go ahead and do that. But I think that's really confusing for people learning an English

  • (British) accent, is when you're confusing it with an American accent. For example, the

  • 'r' sound, the rhotic 'r', so in words like 'car', in British English we don't say the

  • 'r' at the end, it's just open 'cah'. But in America they say it like "carrrr", so they've

  • got an 'r' at the end of the word, and just little things like that, British people will

  • pick up on it and go "oh, you're not from here" because they've heard you say "carrr"

  • instead of "cah". Yeah, 'that's a really nice carrr'. It's not right. Well it's not incorrect,

  • it's just not British. Another thing that you said "example", we've covered this in

  • other videos, it's just these small little signs, you know 'example' is really American.

  • And also Northern. I would say 'for example', but that's not the be-all-and-end-all. No,

  • no one's gunna not understand you, it's just that if you want to be really specific, then

  • you need to listen out for these tiny little differences. Sounding more 'British' gives

  • you more social capital. It's not just a dated idea, it's not just the BBC English that Joel

  • was talking about, it's true. If you're coming here and having job interviews, for instance.

  • Language is your biggest tool and your strongest weapon. It's a sad reality, that if you come

  • over and have a job interview, and you're against a British English person and you speak

  • English perfectly well, you're just as intelligent, maybe more intelligent, but you don't quite

  • sound the same, people will judge you on that and you most likely won't get the job because

  • they want to go with someone who - well people are shallow and they'll go with someone that

  • sounds like them. Exactly, I think that's why as well, we've tried to create this channel

  • which is just about British culture because you could speak perfectly, your pronunciation

  • and everything about your English could be perfect. But an employer might be looking

  • for you to just have a sense of humour that is similar to theirs or just be on that level

  • with somebody where they feel like they can go to the pub with you, that they can have

  • a drink with you, that they can have banter. And I feel like what we're trying to give

  • you, is British-ness in one. Do you know what I mean? Yeah, because socialising is a huge

  • part of British culture even in the workplace. Yeah, for sure. If I met somebody and I had

  • a job, I know I would go for personality as well as if they were qualified for the job,

  • because imagine having someone who's personality shines through the phone and you're talking

  • to clients and so on. You just need that personable thing, going on for you. And you can't only

  • get that from speaking the language that comes with living here, having British friends,

  • making that commitment to yourself that you're gunna dive into British culture and really

  • go for it. Yep, definitely. There's a lady at work who's absolutely lovely, she speaks

  • English as a second language and speaks English perfectly, absolutely perfectly, and I overheard

  • a conversation with her colleague and she was saying that during her appraisal, her

  • boss had come to her and said "there's no issue with what you're saying or what you're

  • doing, like you're really great at this, but you're just a bit cold and abrupt with customers"

  • and she'd said it was because English was her second language so whilst the issue isn't

  • with her speaking, it's about her mannerisms, her attitude, and things like that, so when

  • you'r learning English as well, don't just learn the sounds, try and learn about the

  • culture and the mannerisms and the etiquette of British English people. it goes the same

  • the other way, like I'm really interest in Japan and I really want to go there. And I

  • would love to learn Japanese, but imagine that I was perfect at Japanese, imagine, but

  • I knew nothing about eating the Japanese way and how to 'be' at the dinner table. I could

  • come across so rude without knowing. You know, it's just the same you've just gotta really

  • absorb it. Definitely. So I hope that's helped those of you that are learning a British English

  • accent. Those are just a few little tips and bits of advice for learning an English accent

  • and culture. We'd love to open up this conversation in the discussion, in the comments section,

  • AS a discussion! So please leave us a comment and let us know your thoughts. These are just

  • our opinions but obviously we're open to hear the opposite. We're open to be wrong! Thank

  • you so much guys, we'll be back next week with another video, don't forget to subscribe.

  • Subscribe! Bye!

Hi I'm Joel and I'm Lia and today we have got an English accent lesson. Before we get

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A2 初級 英國腔

學習英國口音的TIPS! (TIPS for Learning British Accents!)

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    周新 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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