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  • I'm an immigrant from Venezuela,

    我是來自委內瑞拉的移民,

  • and I've lived in the US for six years.

    已經在美國住了六年。

  • If you ask me about my life as an expatriate,

    若你問我異鄉的生活如何,

  • I would say that I've been lucky.

    我會說我很幸運,

  • But it hasn't been easy.

    儘管並非事事如意。

  • Growing up, I never thought that I was going to leave my homeland.

    成長過程中,我從未想過 有天會離開家鄉。

  • I participated in my first student protest in 2007,

    2007 年我第一次 參加學生街頭抗爭,

  • when the president shut down one of the most important news networks.

    因為當時的總統下令關閉 最重要的新聞媒體網路。

  • I was getting my bachelor's degree in communications,

    我那時在大學念大眾傳播,

  • and that was the first time I realized I couldn't take free speech for granted.

    那是我初次了解到,

  • We knew things were getting bad, but we never saw what was coming:

    言論自由原來不是理所當然。

  • an economic crisis, infrastructure breaking down,

    我們知道情況在惡化, 但沒料到後來一連串的:

  • citywide electrical blackouts,

    經濟金融危機、 民生設施停擺、

  • the decline of public health care and shortage of medicines,

    市區斷電頻傳、

  • disease outbreaks and starvation.

    健保衰退、醫藥短缺、

  • I moved to Canada with my husband in 2013,

    疾病爆發、人民挨餓。

  • and we always thought we'd move back home when the crisis improved.

    2013 年,我和我丈夫搬到加拿大,

  • But we never did.

    一直以為危機過後 我們會再搬回去。

  • Nearly all my childhood friends have left the country,

    但我們始終沒有回去。

  • but my parents are still there.

    幾乎所有兒時的朋友也都離開了,

  • There have been moments where I've called my mom,

    但我的雙親還在那裡。

  • and I could hear people screaming and crying in the background

    有時,當我打電話回去給我母親,

  • as teargas bombs exploded in the streets.

    我可以聽到電話另一端 街上的催淚彈爆炸聲,

  • And my mom, as if I couldn't hear it, would always tell me,

    及人們的尖叫、哀號聲。

  • (Speaking Spanish)

    我母親總是一成不變地, 好像那些聲響不存在似的,

  • "We're fine, don't worry."

    (西班牙文)

  • But of course, I worry.

    她說:「我們很好,別擔心。」

  • It's my parents, and I'm 4,000 miles away.

    但,我怎麼可能不擔心。

  • Today, I'm just one of more than four million Venezuelans

    他們是我的父母, 遠在四千英里外。

  • who have left their home country.

    其實,我只是離鄉背井的 四百萬委內瑞拉人其中之一。

  • A lot of my friends are Venezuelan immigrants,

    我的許多朋友也都是委內瑞拉出來的,

  • and in the last few years,

    過去幾年,我們開始發想

  • we've begun talking about how we could make a difference

    有什麼我們能做的, 即使離故鄉這麼遠。

  • when we live so far away.

    於是「委內瑞拉程式碼」 就在 2019 年誕生了。

  • That is how Code for Venezuela was born in 2019.

    最初從一個駭客松開始, 因為我們都是科技人,

  • It began with a hackathon, because we are experts in tech,

    我們想或許可以發揮我們的所長

  • and we thought we could use our tech skills

    為在地人創造一些解決方案。

  • to create solutions for people on the ground.

    但首先,我們得要找到一些

  • But first, we needed to find some experts actually living inside Venezuela

    實際住在委內瑞拉的專家來指導。

  • to guide us.

    因為我們看過太多其他的駭客松,

  • We'd see so many other hackathons

    做出了很多精心設計、 雄心勃勃又出色的軟體,

  • that came up with wily, ambitious, incredible technological solutions

    理論聽起來都很棒,

  • that sounded great in theory but ultimately failed to work

    可是當真正要在目標國家 施行時卻失敗了。

  • in the actual countries they were intended to help.

    我們許多人在國外住了數年,

  • Many of us have been living abroad for years,

    我們已經不是很清楚

  • and we are detached from the day-to-day problems

    在委內瑞拉的人 每天所要面對的問題。

  • that people are facing in Venezuela.

    所以我們向真正住在 當地的專家求助。

  • So we turned to the experts actually living inside of the country.

    比如,胡利歐•卡斯楚醫師,

  • For example, Julio Castro,

    他是「醫療保健網」領導人之一。

  • a doctor and one of the leaders ofdicos por la Salud.

    2015 年,當政府停止發佈 健康保健的官方資料後,

  • When the government stopped publishing official health care data in 2015,

    胡利歐醫生組織了一個非官方、

  • Dr. Julio began collecting information himself,

    協調運作良好的手機通報系統, 開始收集相關資訊。

  • using an informal but coordinated system

    其中包含醫療人員、藥物、器材、

  • of cell phone communications.

    死亡率、疾病爆發等資訊;

  • They track available personnel, medical supplies, mortality data,

    將之匯編成報告, 在推特上分享。

  • disease outbreaks;

    講到委內瑞拉醫療保健, 他是我們的在地專家。

  • compile it into a report;

    再來,路易•斯卡羅斯•迪亞茲,

  • and then share that on Twitter.

    一位廣為人知的記者,

  • He became our go-to expert on health care in Venezuela.

    專注報導委內瑞拉的 審查制度及人權侵犯。

  • Luis Carlosaz,

    他主要協助我們了解事情的真相,

  • a widely recognized journalist who reports acts of censorship

    因為新聞都是政府在掌控。

  • and human rights violations suffered by the people of Venezuela,

    我們稱這些人為在地英雄。

  • he helps us make sense of what is happening there,

    有了他們的專業建議,

  • since the news is controlled by the government.

    我們提出一系列的挑戰 給駭客松的參賽者。

  • We call these people our heroes on the ground.

    第一場駭客松共有 來自七個國家,三百人參加,

  • With their expert advice, we came up with a series of challenges

    總共提出了十六個不同的計畫。

  • for hackathon participants.

    我們挑出其中最有潛力的,

  • In that first hackathon, we had 300 participants

    在賽後繼續發展。

  • from seven countries

    今天我要分享 其中兩個最成功的計畫,

  • come up with 16 different project submissions.

    讓大家看看我們目前的成果。

  • We picked the projects with the most potential

    分別是「醫療推特」 和「停電追蹤器」。

  • and continued working on them after the event.

    醫療推特是個智慧推特機器人,

  • Today, I'll share two of our most successful projects

    它能協助委內瑞拉人民 找到他們需要的藥物。

  • to give you a taste of the impact we are having so far.

    現在,在委內瑞拉,

  • They're called MediTweet and Blackout Tracker.

    如果你生病去求醫,

  • MediTweet is an intelligent Twitter bot

    醫院也不見得有 治療你疾病所需的醫材。

  • that helps Venezuelans find the medicine they need.

    情況惡劣到

  • Right now in Venezuela,

    醫生通常會給病人 一張「購物清單」,

  • if you get sick and you go to a hospital,

    而不是處方簽。

  • there is a good chance they won't have the right medical supplies to treat you.

    關於這個我有親身經驗。

  • The situation is so bad

    2015 年,我母親被診斷出癌症。

  • that patients often get a "shopping list" from the doctor

    她需要做腰椎穿刺,

  • instead of a prescription.

    醫生才能確診 並訂定治療計畫。

  • I live the need for this firsthand.

    但醫院沒有做穿刺所需的針。

  • My mom was diagnosed with cancer in 2015.

    當時我人在委內瑞拉,

  • She needed to have a lumbar puncture

    我每天看著母親的情況越來越糟。

  • to get a final diagnosis and treatment plan.

    我們找了很久, 終於在網路上找到了,

  • But the needle for this procedure wasn't available.

    那個網站就像是拉丁美洲的 eBay。

  • I was in Venezuela at that time,

    我跟賣家約在附近的麵包店,

  • and I was seeing my mom getting worse in front of me every day.

    好像在黑市買東西一樣。

  • After looking everywhere, we found the needle in a site

    我母親把針帶去給醫生, 醫生進行了手術。

  • that is like the eBay of Latin America.

    沒有那根針,她早就不在了。

  • I met the seller in a local bakery,

    但不僅是醫材,藥品也是如此。

  • and it was like buying something on the black market.

    她剛確診時,

  • My mom brought the needle to her doctor, and he did the procedure.

    我們還能在公家藥房 買到她所需的藥品。

  • Without this, she could have died.

    也不用花什麼錢。

  • But it's not just medical supplies,

    可是當公家藥房存貨用完,

  • it's medicines, too.

    我母親還有六個月的療程。

  • When she was first diagnosed,

    六個月的療程。

  • we bought her treatment in a state pharmacy,

    我們在網路上買到一些藥, 剩下的從墨西哥買。

  • and it was, like, practically free.

    目前她正處於緩解的第三年,

  • But then the state pharmacy ran out,

    每次我打電話去,

  • and we still had six months of treatment ahead.

    她就會告訴我: 「我很好,別擔心。」

  • Six months of treatment ahead.

    但並非人人都有辦法 離開委內瑞拉,

  • We bought some medicines online and the rest in Mexico.

    許多人的健康狀況也無法旅行。

  • Now she's in her third year of remission,

    那就是為什麼人民會轉向推特,

  • and every time that I call,

    用「#ServicioPublico」 來買賣藥品,

  • she tells me, "I'm fine, don't worry."

    這個標籤是「公共服務」。

  • But not everyone can afford to leave the country,

    這個推特機器人能掃瞄 #ServicioPublico,

  • and many aren't healthy enough to travel.

    將那些搜尋特定藥品的使用者

  • That is why people turn to Twitter,

    和販賣私人用剩 藥品的賣家連結起來。

  • buying and selling medicines using the hashtag #ServicioPublico,

    我們再把這些推特 用戶的地點資料統合,

  • meaning "public service."

    做成一個視覺化的工具。

  • Our Twitter bot scans Twitter for the hashtag #ServicioPublico

    類似「保健醫生」的在地組織,

  • and connects users who are asking for specific medicines

    能一看就知道什麼地方缺少什麼。

  • with those who are selling their private leftovers.

    我們也將機器學習演算法

  • We also pool the location data of those Twitter users

    運用在偵測疾病發生的區域,

  • and use it for a visualization tool.

    以及當地是否有援助物資,

  • It gives local organizations likedicos por la Salud

    這個工具可以協助有關單位

  • a sense of where they have a shortage.

    在補給品的分配上 做出更好的決策。

  • We can also apply machine learning algorithms

    我們的第二個計畫 叫做「停電追蹤器」,

  • to detect clusters of disease.

    目前,委內瑞拉正值電力危機。

  • If they've received humanitarian aid,

    去年委內瑞拉的斷電次數多到

  • this could help them to make better decisions

    有些人說是有史以來最慘的一年。

  • about the distributions of the supplies.

    我有足足兩天無法和我父母通訊。

  • Our second project, is called Blackout Tracker.

    有些城市天天停電。

  • Venezuela is currently going through an electricity crisis.

    但這些只能在社群媒體上看到。

  • Last year, Venezuela suffered what some people consider

    因為政府不會在新聞上報導停電。

  • the worst power failures in Venezuelan history.

    現在一斷電,委內瑞拉人 就趕快打開手機,

  • I had two long days without communication with my parents.

    用推特發出「SinLuz」標籤 及其所在位置,

  • Some cities experienced blackouts every day.

    這標籤的意思是「沒電」,

  • But you only know about this on social media.

    當然是在手機電池還有電時,

  • The government won't report blackouts on the news.

    這樣全國各地的人 都知道哪裡斷電。

  • When the power goes out,

    就像醫療推特,

  • many Venezuelans, we quickly tweet out the location with the hashtag #SinLuz,

    停電追蹤器掃瞄推特, 找出 #SinLuz 標籤,

  • meaning "without electricity,"

    把使用者的地點做成一張地圖。

  • before their phones ran out of battery,

    你能一眼看到

  • so people around the country know what is happening.

    今天哪些地方停電,

  • Like MediTweet,

    以及某特定時段 總共斷電了幾次。

  • Blackout Tracker scans Twitter for the hashtag #SinLuz

    人民有知的權利,

  • and creates a map using the location data of those users.

    我們提供辦法。

  • You can quickly see

    同時,這些資訊也能作為依據,

  • where the blackouts are happening today

    以前政府很輕易就能否認問題的存在,

  • and how many blackouts have happened over time.

    或是找藉口塘塞,

  • People want to know what is happening,

    因為沒有官方數據。

  • and this is our answer.

    現在有了停電追蹤器, 則可呈現出問題的嚴重性。

  • But it's also a way of holding the government accountable.

    當然有些矽谷人 可能會覺得這些計畫

  • It's easy for them to deny that the problem exists

    好像沒什麼重大的技術創新。

  • or make excuses,

    可是,那正是重點。

  • because there is no official data on it.

    這些計畫雖然不是超級先進,

  • Blackout Tracker shows how bad the problem really is.

    卻是委內瑞拉人民需要的,

  • Now, some people in Silicon Valley may look at these projects

    對生活有巨大影響的。

  • and say that there are no major technological innovations.

    除此之外,我們最大的成就

  • But that is the point.

    或許是開始一項運動,

  • These projects are not insanely advanced,

    一個將世界各地的人集結在一起,

  • but it's what the people of Venezuela need,

    運用專業技,幫委內瑞拉人民 創造出一些解決方案。

  • and they can have a tremendous impact.

    同時,因為與當地人合作,

  • Beyond these projects, perhaps our most significant accomplishment

    我們做出來的是人民 想要、需要的解決方案。

  • is that a movement has been created,

    更棒的一點是,

  • one where people around the world are coming together

    我們用的是本身的專業技能,

  • to use their professional skills to create solutions for the people of Venezuela.

    所以做來得心應手,

  • And because we are partnering with locals,

    輕輕鬆鬆就發揮了影響力。

  • we are creating the solutions that people want and need.

    今天假設在舊金山,

  • What is so great about this

    有人想聘請專業人士 開發出醫療推特

  • is that we are using our professional skills,

    或停電追蹤器 這類解決方案,

  • so it comes easily and naturally.

    可得花一筆不小的錢。

  • It's not that hard for us to make a difference.

    我們只是提供自身的技能,

  • If someone from San Francisco

    發揮的影響力卻比純粹捐錢還大。

  • were to hire professionals to create solutions

    各位同樣也能做到——

  • like MediTweet or Blackout Tracker,

    不一定是委內瑞拉,

  • it would cost a small fortune.

    而是貢獻給你自己的社會。

  • By donating our services,

    現今世界似乎比以往更緊密相連,

  • we are making a bigger impact than if we were just to donate money.

    但仍有許多處於偏僻 或封閉角落的社群,

  • And you can do the same thing --

    只要我們願意就能伸出援手。

  • not in Venezuela, necessarily,

    我也相信,你們可以 運用本身的專業技能

  • but in your own community.

    將不同社群的資源串聯起來,

  • In a world that is more connected than ever,

    創造出有效的解決方案。

  • we still see how specialized communities can be living isolated or in silos.

    任何一個有知識、 有專業技能的人,

  • There are so many great ways to help,

    都有強大的力量 能帶給社會希望。

  • but I believe that you can use your professional skills

    對我們「委內瑞拉程式碼」而言,

  • to connect diverse communities and create effective solutions

    這還只是開端。

  • through those relationships.

    謝謝。

  • Anyone with knowledge and professional skills

    (掌聲)

  • has a powerful force to bring hope to a community.

  • For us at Code for Venezuela,

  • this is just the beginning.

  • Thank you.

  • (Applause)

I'm an immigrant from Venezuela,

我是來自委內瑞拉的移民,

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B1 中級 中文 TED 委內瑞拉 推特 追蹤器 藥品 醫療

用簡單有效的技術連接危機中的社區--約翰娜-菲格拉 (Simple, effective tech to connect communities in crisis | Johanna Figueira)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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