Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Hello, everyone. Welcome to this English course on adverbs.

  • And in this video we're gonna talk about adverbs. Now the simplest definition of an adverb is

  • that it's a word that describes or modifies a verb.

  • Now actually adverbs can modify other parts of the sentence like other adverbs.

  • But in this video, we will focus on verbs and four kinds of adverbs.

  • Adverbs of time. Adverbs of place. Of Manner and Adverbs of Degree.

  • Usually they will answer the following questions about the verbs:

  • When? Where? How? and To what extent?

  • Let's look at these sentences. "The boy ran."

  • And then we have, "The boy ran excitedly."

  • Now this example shows the power of adverbs. In the second sentence you find out how the

  • boy ran. In the first sentence you don't have any

  • information on how the boy ran. So in the second sentence, we find out that

  • the boy was very excited. So it's very important to understand adverbs

  • and understand how to use them because they will make you speak English a

  • lot better. So let's get started.

  • First let's talk about the position of an adverb.

  • So where do we put the adverb in the sentence? Now that is a bit tricky because the adverb

  • in an English sentence can be in different parts of the sentence.

  • Let's look at a few examples: She climbed the mountain slowly.

  • Slowly she climbed the mountain. She slowly climbed the mountain.

  • Can you guess which word is the adverb? The word 'slowly' is the adverb.

  • It describes how she climbed the mountain. And as you can see, the adverb is in three

  • different parts of the sentence but the meaning is exactly the same.

  • Let's now talk about how to make adverbs. Now most adverbs, not all of them, but most

  • of them end in -ly. So it's actually very easy.

  • You take the adjective and you add 'ly' at the end.

  • Let's look at a few examples. If you have the adjective 'nice', and you

  • add 'ly' to it, you make the adverb 'nicely'. So for example you could say,

  • "He is a nice speaker" using the adjective 'nice'.

  • But you could also use the adverb 'nicely' and say,

  • "He speaks nicely." A second example - If we take the adjective

  • 'quick', and we add 'ly', we can make the adverb 'quickly'.

  • So we could say, "He is a quick runner."

  • But we could also say, "He runs quickly."

  • Be careful guys. Not all adverbs end in 'ly'.

  • Some adjectives don't change form when they become adverbs.

  • They're called flat adverbs. Typical flat adverbs would be 'early' or 'late'

  • and a few others. And it's very important to know these flat

  • adverbs. Because a lot of my students try to add 'ly'

  • to some adjectives and unfortunately they make incorrect sentences.

  • So let's take a look at an example. Okay. If I tell you

  • "The car drove fastly" Do you think that makes sense?

  • Now it does make sense to try to add 'ly' to the adjective 'fast',

  • but unfortunately guys 'fastly' does not exist in English.

  • So the correct sentence is, "The car drove fast."

  • Another example, "He arrived 'late' or 'lately' to class."

  • What do you think's the correct answer? Again, it makes sense to try to add 'ly' to

  • the adjective 'late', but 'lately' is not the adverb of the adjective

  • 'late'. The adverb is 'late'.

  • So the correct sentence is, "He arrived late to class."

  • Let's now take a look at a few sentences to practice finding and making adverbs that modify

  • verbs. Now remember, adverbs tell us so much about

  • the verb. Usually they tell us 'when' or 'where' or

  • 'how' or 'to what degree'. So the first example we have is,

  • "He easily lifted the box." Can you spot the adverb in this sentence?

  • Of course the adverb is 'easily' - ending in 'ly'.

  • Okay and it tells us how he lifted the box. It's an adverb of manner.

  • Now the second sentence, and this is a bit more difficult,

  • "I will download the file tomorrow." Now where is the adverb?

  • Because there is no word ending in 'ly', so it's a bit more complicated.

  • Well the adverb is 'tomorrow' and it tells you 'when'.

  • It's an adverb of time. And these are sometimes a bit more difficult.

  • Make sure you watch my next video. I will talk about them.

  • Our third example now. "I put it there."

  • Again no words ending in 'ly'. The adverb is the word 'there'.

  • And it tells us 'where'. It's an adverb of place.

  • We will talk about them in our next videos as well.

  • And our last example, "You didn't study enough for the test."

  • The adverb is the word 'enough'. And it's an adverb of degree.

  • Okay. It tells us to what degree.

  • Again it's not a word ending in 'ly'. And we will talk about adverbs of degree in

  • our next videos. Remember guys - it's very important to understand

  • adverbs and to know how to make them. They will make you speak English so much better.

  • And this video was only a quick introduction to adverbs in English.

  • In our next videos, we will focus on each kind of adverbs.

  • So make sure you watch the rest of the course. Thank you for watching my video and see you

  • next time. Thank you guys for watching my video.

  • I hope you liked it and found it useful. If you have, please show me your support.

  • Click 'like', subscribe to the channel. Put your comments below if you have any,.

  • And share the video with your friends. See you.

  • Hello, everyone. Welcome to this English course on adverbs.

  • And in this video I'm gonna focus on Adverbs of Time.

  • Now adverbs of time tell us 'when' an action happens,

  • and also 'how long' and 'how often'. Now these adverbs are extremely common in

  • English, so you really need to know about them.

  • So let's start learning together. Let's now take a look at a few example sentences

  • telling us 'when' something happened. 'She ate ice cream yesterday.'

  • The adverb in this sentence ishave you noticed?

  • 'yesterday' of course. And it's an adverb of time.

  • When did you eat ice cream? 'yesterday'

  • I see you now. Now where is the adverb in this sentence?

  • Of course the adverb is 'now'. Again it's an adverb of time.

  • When do I see you? 'now'

  • 'I tell him daily.' The adverb is 'daily'.

  • Again adverb of time. 'We met last year.'

  • Can you see the adverb? Of course the adverb in this case is 'last

  • year'. Again notion of time.

  • When did we meet? 'last year'

  • And finally, 'He will call you later'. The adverb in this sentence is also an adverb

  • of time. It is 'later'.

  • So these are all adverbs of time And as you can see in those examples,

  • usually adverbs of time are at the end of the sentence.

  • Let's now move on to example sentences showing us how long something happened.

  • These adverbs are also usually placed at the end of the sentence.

  • But let's have a look. 'She stayed home all day.'

  • Which part of this sentence is an adverb? Can you see it?

  • Of course, 'all day'. And it tells us how long she stayed home.

  • 'I studied in Canada for a year now.' In this sentence, 'for a year' tells us

  • how long I studied in Canada. 'He has taught English since 1990.'

  • How long has he taught English? Since 1990.

  • 'I studied English for four hours.' Which pond is the adverb?

  • 'For four hours' 'How long did I study English?'

  • 'for four hours' And finally, 'We have lived in New Zealand

  • since 2005.' The adverb is of course 'since 2005'.

  • As you can see adverbs are not necessarily just one word.

  • 'since 2005' - two words. 'for four hours' - three words.

  • Okay, so they're not just one word sometimes they're more than one.

  • Adverbs telling us how often express the frequency of an action.

  • They're usually placed before the main verb, but after the auxiliary verb,

  • such as B may have or must. The only exception is if the main verb is

  • the verb to be. In which case the adverb goes after the main

  • verb. Let's have a look at a few example sentences.

  • 'I often eat pizza.' Can you spot the adverb?

  • It's 'often'. And as you can see, it is placed before the

  • main verb which is 'eat'. So 'I often eat'.

  • The second example, 'He has never drunk Cola.'

  • In this case, we have an auxiliary verb. The auxiliary verb 'have' and the main

  • verb is 'drunk'. So the adverb is placed between the auxiliary

  • verb and the main verb. 'He has never drunk.'

  • 'You must always brush your teeth.' Same applies.

  • We have an auxiliary verb 'must'. Okay.

  • And we have the main verb 'brush', so the adverb goes after the axillary verb,

  • but before the main verb. 'You must always brush.'

  • 'I am seldom late'. So the main verb is the verb 'to be'.

  • Be careful. So in this case the adverb goes after the

  • main verb. 'I am seldom late'.

  • And finally, 'He rarely lies.'

  • The main verb is 'lies'. So the adverb goes before the main verb.

  • 'He rarely lies'. Okay.

  • Some adverbs expressing 'how often' express the exact number of times that an action happened

  • They're called definite 'adverbs of frequency'. And in this case, they're usually placed at

  • the end of the sentence. Let's have a look at a few examples.

  • 'I visit my dentist yearly.' The adverb is 'yearly'.

  • Okay. 'Once a year' and it expresses the exact

  • number of times that I visit my dentist. It's a definite adverb of frequency,

  • so it's placed at the end of the sentence. Other example,

  • 'He goes to the gym once a week.' Again we have a definite adverb of frequency

  • which is 'once a week'. 'I work five days a week.'

  • Same thing. We have a definite adverb of frequency which

  • is 'five days a week' so it's placed at the end of the sentence.

  • And finally, 'I saw the movie five times.'

  • Again 'five times' expresses the exact number of times that I saw the movie.

  • Now, if you want to use more than one adverb of

  • time in a sentence, you should put them in the following order:

  • First, 'how long?'. Second, 'how often?'.

  • And finally, 'when?'. Let's take a look at a very good example sentence.

  • 'He taught at the school for ten days every month last year.'

  • Now as you can see, first, we're told 'how long' - for ten days.

  • Then, we're told 'how often' - every month. And finally, were told 'when' exactly

  • - last year. This is a very good sentence using the different

  • kinds of adverbs of time in the right order, so I hope you can do the same.

  • Okay, guys. Let's do a bit of extra practice.

  • I have four example sentences for you to spot adverbs of time,

  • so let's get started. 'He has been to Canada three times.'

  • Can you spot the adverb? Of course the adverb is the adverb frequency

  • 'three times'. Okay.

  • How often has he been to Canada three times. The second example is,

  • 'Generally I don't like to eat spicy food.' The adverb is 'generally'.

  • And remember I told you some adverbs of frequency work well at the beginning of a sentence if

  • you want to emphasize the frequency, so 'generally' is one of them.

  • Another example would be 'sometimes'. Next example.

  • 'He will clean his room regularly from now on.'

  • Now be careful. In this case, we have two adverbs.

  • The first one 'regularly'. The second one 'from now on'.

  • Keeping the order, 'regularly' is 'how often?'

  • followed by 'when?' – 'from now on'. And finally,

  • 'I've been going to church for four days every month since 1996.'

  • Three adverbs in this case. 'how long?' – 'for four days'

  • 'how often?' - 'every month'

  • 'when?' – 'since 1996' Okay guys.

  • You now know a lot more about adverbs of time. Remember these adverbs are extremely common

  • in English, so it's very important for you to learn about

  • them. They will improve your English skills very

  • quickly. Okay now there are obviously other types of

  • adverbs - adverbs of place of manner and of degree

  • And I will focus on these in my next videos, so check them out.

  • Thank you for watching my video and see you next time.

  • Thank you very much guys for watching my video. I hope you liked it, and if you did, please

  • show me your support. Click like, subscribe to the channel, put

  • your comments below if you have some, and share it with all your friends.

  • Hello, everyone. Welcome to this English course on adverbs.

  • In this video, we're gonna talk about adverbs of place.

  • Adverbs of place tell us where an action happens. They could also give us information on direction,

  • distance, or movement. Let's take a look at a quick example.

  • 'Let's go and play outdoors.' Now in this sentence, the adverb of place

  • is 'outdoors'. It answers the question, 'Where?'.

  • Where? 'Outdoors.'

  • Okay. Now let's learn a bit more about adverbs

  • of place together. Let's get started.

  • First, let's talk a bit about 'here' and 'there'.

  • 'Here' and 'there' are two adverbs of place that relates specifically to the

  • speaker. 'Here' meaning close to the speaker.

  • Close to me. 'There' meaning farther away.

  • Okay. Let's take a look at a few examples. 'I put my keys there.'

  • So the adverb 'there' indicating the location of the keys

  • and they're a bit farther away from me. Okay?

  • Second example. 'Please come here.'

  • 'Here' being the adverb, you know, meaning to me.

  • So these adverbs are place at the end of the sentence.

  • But you can also put them at the beginning if you want to emphasize the location.

  • For example, 'Here are your keys.'

  • 'Here'. close to me.

  • 'There is your umbrella.' Over there, farther away.

  • So in these two cases, I want to emphasize the location

  • so I place the adverb at the beginning of the sentence.

  • Okay, guys? Let's now take a look at adverbs of movement

  • and directions. Some adverbs end in '-ward'.

  • Or '-wards'. It's the same thing.

  • And they express movement in a particular direction.

  • For example, 'homeward' or 'homewards' 'backward' or 'backwards'

  • 'forward' or 'forwards' 'onward' or 'onwards'

  • So they express a movement. And they specify a particular direction.

  • Let's take a look at a few examples sentences. 'We drove eastwards.' or 'eastward'.

  • It would be the exact same thing. 'The children looked upwards at the stars.'

  • 'You need to move forward one step.' So each time you have a movement specifying

  • the direction of this movement. Okay?