Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • - What does squirrel taste like?

  • Squirrel tastes like squirrel.

  • (Rob laughs)

  • (upbeat instrumental music)

  • For one year, I only ate foods that I grew and foraged.

  • One year without grocery stories or restaurants,

  • nothing packaged or processed,

  • nothing shipped long distances.

  • Literally, everything I ate for the entire year

  • came from my garden or that I harvested from nature.

  • My name is Rob Greenfield.

  • I'm an environmental activist who embarks

  • on extreme adventures to bring attention

  • to important environmental and social issues.

  • Basically, I believe that our current global industrial

  • food system is broken.

  • Everywhere you look, it's causing severe destruction

  • to people, to other species, and to the earth as a whole.

  • And so I wanted to do something extreme.

  • I've always had the question, would it be possible

  • to step away from big ag,

  • step away from the global industrial food system,

  • and could I exist without grocery stories and restaurants

  • and actually grow all my own food?

  • I couldn't find people that had done it,

  • so for me, the solution was to do it myself

  • and see if it was possible.

  • When I started, I didn't know how much sun

  • does a carrot need?

  • How much water do you put on your collards

  • or your Swiss chard?

  • I was just literally on the internet researching

  • every plant and how to do it.

  • Food didn't get bland because I ate over 300 species

  • of food, I grew over 100 different foods,

  • and I foraged over 200 different foods.

  • That's almost a new species for every day

  • of the entire year.

  • I made my own flour by dehydrating cassava and yam.

  • Then I could make my own tortillas and bread.

  • I fermented a lot of foods and made things

  • like sauerkraut and honey wine and ginger beer.

  • I ate dozens and dozens of different meals

  • throughout the year that were really varied.

  • It really didn't get boring.

  • I chose Florida because as someone

  • who had minimal experience, I did want to be somewhere

  • where I could grow food year round.

  • It can be done in colder climates,

  • but I wanted to choose an easier place

  • since I was just a beginner.

  • What I chose to do was not live on a farm,

  • not live out in the countryside, because I wanted

  • to impact people, I wanted people to see me growing

  • my food, I wanted to interact with the community.

  • When I arrived in Florida,

  • one of the first things that I did

  • is I connected with the local food growing movement.

  • I went to the community garden.

  • So I just really immersed in the community

  • and got to know people, and I asked people

  • in the community if they would like to have free food

  • growing right in their yard rather than just grass,

  • and the people lined up to have me turn their yard

  • into a garden.

  • I ended up having six front-yard gardens,

  • and they were available for anyone to eat from.

  • Quickly it went from grass to having really enough food

  • for dozens or even hundreds of people to eat from.

  • And they were basically community gardens.

  • Anybody could walk in and eat the food.

  • For the year, I lived in a tiny house that I built

  • out of 99% second-hand materials.

  • It's 10-feet by 10-feet, so very small.

  • My arm span is six feet, so I span across most of it.

  • Basically it was a bed, a desk with a chair,

  • a freezer to store food, a couple of shelves

  • to store a lot of food, and then under the bed,

  • there was storage as well.

  • Being in Florida, I was able to utilize outside as well.

  • My kitchen was an outdoor kitchen,

  • and that was powered by rain water, so my sink was

  • just rain water for washing dishes and hands,

  • and I also had an outdoor compost toilet

  • where I would compost my poop and pee,

  • and turn that into fertile soil rather than

  • wasting water and shipping it off

  • to be someone else's problem.

  • That fertilizer is used on fruit trees,

  • so not on your kale and stuff on the ground,

  • but on fruit trees where the fruit is high above.

  • And then lastly I had an outdoor shower as well,

  • and the water from that was harvested from rain,

  • and then the water would be used to water banana plants

  • to grow bananas.

  • I gave myself six months to prepare,

  • but that ended up being ten months before I actually

  • started it, and I started from scratch.

  • I had to get seeds and soil

  • and figure out the absolute basics.

  • My basic strategy was to plant way more than I would need

  • so that way I would have enough.

  • That meant more work, but it ensured the success.

  • I talked to the local gardeners and farmers,

  • and I asked, "What grows so ridiculously well

  • "that even if you barely know what you're doing,

  • "it's not just going to survive, but it's actually going

  • "to thrive?"

  • I asked what has the fewest pests, what produces

  • a huge amount of food, and what can handle neglect?

  • And that is what I planted.

  • Most of these were foods that I had never eaten before,

  • you don't see at the grocery store, and a lot of them

  • I didn't even know the name of.

  • Things like chaya or moringa or katuk.

  • There were dozens of plants that became my staple foods

  • that are staples for people around the world,

  • but that were pretty much unknown to me

  • and most of the people I was around.

  • A year is a pretty long time.

  • Imagine taking any sort of diet and doing it

  • for an entire year.

  • Through the year, I had my ups and downs.

  • At times, felt my absolute best,

  • and then there was times that I was worried about my health.

  • One of the most interesting times was just

  • at the very beginning.

  • It was just about a week and a half in,

  • and I realized that my digestion was the best

  • that I had felt it in my adult life.

  • By the middle of the year, I found that I had

  • a deficiency I thought in fat and protein.

  • That's one of the hardest things to really get.

  • For me this is really funny because I was plant-based

  • fully for two years, and I didn't eat any meat.

  • I was trying to grow plant-based protein.

  • I was growing beans and peas that did really well,

  • but I was trying to grow peanuts and sunflowers.

  • And I was really excited to make my own peanut butter.

  • Literally from soil to the jar of peanut butter.

  • I was so excited for it.

  • But the problem was the squirrels wanted my peanuts

  • and they wanted my sunflowers.

  • I grew, I put a lot of energy into it,

  • and I almost, I barely ate just a few,

  • because they would eat them long before they were even ready

  • for me to eat them.

  • So in permaculture there's a saying, and that's,

  • "Turn your problem into your solution."

  • The squirrels were my problem.

  • They were eating my plant-based form of protein.

  • So I ate the squirrels.

  • (record scratches)

  • In doing so, I got protein that I needed,

  • and I took care of something that was causing me

  • a hard time in my garden.

  • I definitely had some controversy over that

  • in the neighborhood, but for me,

  • it's not about black and white.

  • We look at our food on our plates, and because it's

  • a grocery store or because it's a restaurant,

  • we just trust it.

  • We don't think about where it came from,

  • the impact that it had on other people, other species,

  • and on the land.

  • You can look at what I'm doing is you see it direct.

  • You see I ate a squirrel.

  • But if you are getting food from a farm,

  • even if it's vegan food, there's a good chance

  • they're killing squirrels or rats or mice

  • that are eating the food.

  • So for me, I'm in the direct fire.

  • You see these things that I'm doing, but the reality is

  • that we're all doing this; we just don't see it.

  • And so it makes it a very different thing.

  • When you're immersed in your food, you start to understand

  • the reality of the dinners that we're eating.

  • And then also, I was in Wisconsin at that time,

  • on a trip for the summer.

  • I went fishing, and I caught fish,

  • and particularly lake trout,

  • which are one of the fattier fishes that are out there,

  • and I actually ate literally the entire trout,

  • even the head, the eyes, the brain

  • because that's where so much of the fat is.

  • Also, deer that were hit by cars,

  • so some people would call that road kill.

  • I call them deer that were killed by cars.

  • That was basically, between the fish and the deer,

  • that was what brought me back into balance

  • and gave my body the nourishment

  • that I wasn't getting otherwise.

  • By the end of the project, I did a body fat composition,

  • and I had 15% body fat,

  • so I was able to work my way back up.

  • And at the end of the year, I felt honestly better

  • than I had recalled in my adult life.

  • I was healthier and I was happier,

  • and I didn't get sick once throughout the entire year.

  • The ironic thing is I have a little bit of a cold right now

  • after this and getting back into the food system.

  • My experience was that this created some of the happiest

  • and healthiest days of my life so far.

  • My goal wasn't just to grow and forage all of my own food.

  • My goal was to help other people do so as well.

  • During the year, I started Gardens for Single Moms,

  • and we built gardens for five single-parent families

  • in the neighborhoods and helped them grow their own food.

  • And we planted over 200 fruit trees

  • that were publicly accessible for everyone to eat from.

  • And then Free Seed Project,

  • and we sent out 5000 garden starter kits to people

  • to grow their own healthy food across the country.

  • A tomato is good on a plate when you get it

  • at the restaurant or a grocery store,

  • but to plant that from seed,

  • to watch it grow, to see it be this little green ball

  • that you can't eat, and then bigger,

  • and then this ripe, juicy, plump tomato,

  • and then to pick that, and to have picked off the insects

  • to the point where you can actually get to eat it

  • because the insects didn't, and you went through

  • all of those times together with that tomato,

  • and then you get to eat that tomato.

  • It might not actually taste better, but it tastes better.

  • There's just that love that went into it,

  • and you feel it, and you're like,

  • "This is the best tomato I've ever had."

  • Most of the food that we buy at the grocery store today

  • is shipped long distances, often from halfway around

  • the world, if not halfway across the country.

  • It's packaged in plastic that will be around

  • for hundreds of years, either in the landfill

  • or in our oceans and our lakes and our forests.

  • It's processed and filled with ingredients

  • that aren't really good for us.

  • Ingredients that we can't name that aren't real food,

  • and it uses a ton of pesticides and herbicides

  • and fertilizers that run off and pollute our water.

  • This food, although it appears harmless on our plates,

  • has so many repercussions to people, to other species,

  • and to the world that we depend on for our existence,

  • and that's why I think it's important to know that.