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  • 29 200: that's the number of days in your life, that is, if you live to the age of 80.

  • If you sleep for eight hours a day, for 80 years, that amounts to 9733 days.

  • In other words, sleep makes up a third of your life.

  • If you work for eight hours a day, five days a week, for an average period of 45 years,

  • that amounts to 3900 days.

  • Or, 13% of your life.

  • But, before you can go to work, you often have to attend school.

  • Because some students attend college and others don't, let's assume an average period of 15

  • years spent in school.

  • If you attend school for eight hours a day, five days a week, for 44 weeks out of the

  • year, that amounts to 1100 days.

  • Or, 4% of your life.

  • If we add up these percentages, that amounts to roughly 50% of your life.

  • So, half of your life is accounted for by sleep and work.

  • Knowing this information may bother you.

  • Or, it may excite you.

  • If it does bother you, allow me to try and change your perspective.

  • Potentially, if we are smart about the decisions we make, with respect to sleep and work, we

  • can get half of our life put together.

  • So, let's start in the land of dreams.

  • The World Health Organization and the National Sleep Foundation recommend that individuals

  • get 8 hours of sleep each night [9].

  • However, 2/3 of adults in developed nations get less than this [9].

  • In other words, 66% of adults are living in a perpetual state of drowsiness.

  • 40% of the population are morning people, also known as larks [9].

  • They have a natural tendency to wake up early and sleep early; they feel the most energized

  • early in the morning and feel sleepy early at night.

  • 30% of people are evening people, also known as owls [9].

  • They have a natural tendency to wake up late and stay up late; they feel energized and

  • sleepy later in the day than larks.

  • The remaining 30% fall somewhere in between these two extremes [9].

  • Society has a bias for larks which leaves owls at a constant disadvantage.

  • Owls are forced to wake up earlier than they naturally desire and fall asleep later than

  • they should.

  • As a result, they're always sleeping less than required and operating in a more drowsy

  • state.

  • If you can, build a life that is in harmony with your natural circadian rhythms: you'll

  • be better off than those who don't.

  • But, there's also a responsibility on society and employers to make environments that are

  • better suited for night owls.

  • That issue aside, how can we get the best sleep each night?

  • Here are a few of my favorite tips from Medline Plus [14]:

  • - Try to sleep at the same time and get up at the same time each day, even on the weekends.

  • This will help your body keep a consistent sleep-wake rhythm and improve your sleep quality.

  • - Avoid napping after 3 PM.

  • Naps make it harder to fall asleep at night.

  • - Try to exercise for at least 30 minutes a day but not too close to bedtime.

  • - Try to get some sunlight during the day so that your sleep cycle is accurately calibrated.

  • Try to get sunlight as soon as you wake up if possible.

  • Conversely, try to dim the lights and avoid screen time before bed.

  • - Lastly, leave time to unwind before bed at the end of the day.

  • Create a nighttime ritual that allows you to progressively get more relaxed before falling

  • asleep.

  • Now that we've discussed sleep, let's move on to the next big part of life: work.

  • According to a poll conducted by GallUp, 85% of people don't feel engaged at work [5].

  • In America, this number is a little bit better at 70% [5].

  • In other words, a lot of people are wasting their time and potential.

  • Imagine how much better the world would be if everyone felt engaged at work.

  • What if everyone is present and excited when they wake up for work each day?

  • What could we accomplish as a species?

  • I know it sounds like I'm asking a lot, but I think getting people to feel engaged

  • is simpler than you might think and it doesn't require that everyone become a musician, an

  • athlete, or a movie star.

  • According to the widely cited Self-Determination Theory (SDT), the answer to why some people

  • love their work more than others is intrinsic motivation.

  • Intrinsically motivated activities are things that we do because they are enjoyable like

  • listening to music, watching a movie, or talking with a friend.

  • The process, itself, is enjoyable; we don't need a reward for doing it.

  • Now, for the real question: can we have jobs that are intrinsically motivating?

  • According to SDT, a job needs to be interesting, provide the right amount of challenge and

  • novelty, and meet three psychological needs to produce and maintain intrinsic motivation:

  • autonomy, competence, and relatedness [10].

  • Autonomy is when you feel like you have personal control over what you do, when you do it,

  • and how you do it.

  • In other words, you feel in control over your work and not like a slave to another.

  • You feel competent when you can get better at what you do and that you're responsible

  • for the outcomes of your actions.

  • And, lastly, relatedness occurs when you feel a connection to the people you work with;

  • you care about them and they care about you.

  • In his book Drive, Daniel H. Pink brings up another element important for career satisfaction

  • which I think is worth touching on: purpose.

  • A person's purpose is a goal, much larger than themselves, that they are working towards.

  • According to Pink, studies done at the University of Rochester found that students who had set

  • and achieved purpose driven goals were happier than students who had set and achieved external

  • goals such as making a certain amount of money [11].

  • As you may have noticed, a satisfying career was not necessarily linked to passion, money,

  • fame, or status.

  • Instead, it was linked to the psychological needs of autonomy, competence, relatedness,

  • and purpose.

  • So, how do you go about acquiring these psychological needs?

  • What can you do, as an individual, to achieve them?

  • In his book So Good They Can't Ignore You, Cal Newport lays outs a straightforward strategy:

  • - Build up your skills in an area.

  • When the skills you have are low in supply but high in demand, you have become more valuable.

  • In other words, you are highly competent.

  • - When you are highly competent and valuable, you have leverage with respect to your work;

  • you have more choice than your employers.

  • - You can use this leverage to be more selective about your own hours, your own teams, and

  • what companies you work for.

  • As a result, you have more control over your autonomy, relatedness, and the purpose you

  • work towards.

  • - To summarize, become competent at an in-demand skill, and use that competence as leverage

  • to get yourself more autonomy, relatedness, and purpose as these are the things that make

  • for a fulfilling career.

  • As you become competent at an in-demand skill, the money will, of course, follow as a byproduct

  • of your valuable nature.

  • Now that we've discussed sleep and work, we've essentially covered 50% of the average

  • life.

  • But, there's one more big aspect that I want to look at.

  • As of 2018, there are approximately 7.6 billion other humans you could get to know [4].

  • Of these 7.6 billion, you will meet 10s of 1000s.

  • Of these thousands, there will be - at any one time - roughly 1500 whose names and faces

  • you could recognize [3].

  • Of these 1500, there will be 150 who you have a fairly good reciprocal relationship with

  • [3].

  • These people will make up your core social group and this number is referred to as Dunbar's

  • Number.

  • Of these 150, there will be roughly five who you are really close to and whom you interact

  • with almost daily [3].

  • The people in these groups will likely fluctuate throughout your life and, based on data presented

  • in The Atlas, it might fluctuate as follows [13].

  • Early in your life, most of your time will be spent with friends and immediate family.

  • As you transition into adulthood, the amount of time you spend with friends and family

  • declines quite a bit, and most of your time is spent with your co-workers, your kids,

  • and your partner.

  • And, as you enter old age, most of your time is spent with your partner or alone.

  • There are so many ways to look at and interpret this data.

  • I encourage you to take a look at the original graphs, linked in the description, and decide

  • what it all means to you.

  • But, I'll share some insights that I have pulled out from the data.

  • My first insight is that this data is descriptive, not prescriptive; it's a representation

  • of how things are but not how they should be.

  • While the average person does spend most of their time with their family from the ages

  • of 15-30, there isn't any reason I couldn't spend more.

  • For example, this data might be a good indicator that I should plan annual family vacations

  • and get-togethers so that I ensure that I am spending as much quality time with my family

  • as I can.

  • It's so easy to get caught up in the everyday problems & ambitions of our lives that we

  • can go years without spending quality time with the people close to us.

  • And, before you know it, they could be gone.

  • My second insight is that picking good co-workers and a good partner are among the most important

  • decisions we can make in a life.

  • These are the people whom most of us will spend the greatest amount of time with.

  • My final insight is that it's important to make peace with yourself.

  • Most of your life will be spent alone, especially in the final years.

  • So, it's important to learn how to live with yourself, know yourself, and live true to

  • yourself so that you can be comfortable, or even happy, in your own mind.

  • These are just some insights that I have pulled from the data, but I would be interested in

  • hearing what you got out of it in the comments.

  • So, that's the mathematics of your life, or at least half of it.

  • If you sleep well, put some thought into your career, wisely choose the people around you,

  • and spend time with your loved ones, I think you'll come to the end of it pretty satisfied.

  • And hey, there's still the whole other half that

  • we didn't even discuss.

  • As always, thanks for watching and I'll see you next time!

29 200: that's the number of days in your life, that is, if you live to the age of 80.

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9分鐘內完成你生命的一半 (Half of Your Life in 9 Minutes)

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    Summer 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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