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  • - Hello all.

  • Welcome to seven tips for effective remote learning

  • with Khan Academy.

  • My name is Meaghan Pattani

  • and I head up US Teacher Education here at Khan Academy

  • and I'm joined today by my colleague Jeremy,

  • who leads our teacher success team.

  • So, just a little heads up,

  • today, we're gonna be covering tips and best practices

  • for remote teaching and learning.

  • Again, Jeremy and I are really here

  • to help support teachers and students

  • as they navigate this remote learning experience.

  • Jeremy and I are both former educators,

  • and we've tried to do our best to put ourselves

  • in your shoes going through this very chaotic time.

  • And we're gonna try our best to provide clear

  • and actionable steps using Khan Academy wherever possible.

  • Just a heads up, today we will not

  • be covering account setup or how to get started.

  • If you wanna learn more about

  • how to get started with Khan Academy.

  • I recommend using the link below,

  • in order to access our quickstart guide.

  • If you want a full copy of the slides

  • and all the links attached

  • in the handouts tab of GoToWebinar,

  • you'll find a full copy of the slides

  • from today's presentation.

  • So, why use Khan Academy for remote learning?

  • Well, Khan Academy is built

  • to serve learners anywhere at any time.

  • You can assign specific skills to practice,

  • or you can have students practice and get instant feedback,

  • you're able to keep track of student progress,

  • even when you're not together,

  • which right now we know is more important than ever.

  • Khan Academy is built to serve learners,

  • anywhere at any time, you don't necessarily need a computer,

  • everything students can access

  • on the web can be accessed on a smartphone.

  • So, if you have students

  • with limited access they'll still be able

  • to reach valuable content.

  • And our content is available

  • in over 40 languages and all for free.

  • Khan Academy is a nonprofit, with a goal to support high,

  • excuse me, high quality education for anyone, anywhere.

  • So, let's start here,

  • and while this may feel a little bit obvious,

  • I think sometimes when teachers

  • and students, jump into remote learning

  • those valuable communication skills

  • that you rely on every day seem to fall apart.

  • So, think about when you go into your classroom.

  • When you walk into your classroom in the morning,

  • you never think, "I'm not gonna talk

  • "to my students all day,"

  • of course you're gonna communicate with them.

  • And for some of your students you

  • are the most important relationship that they have every day

  • and so, now more than ever,

  • your students are in need of consistent communication.

  • So, if you and your students can connect live,

  • absolutely do it,

  • even if it's a learning curve for you and for them

  • there's some really great tools out there,

  • like Hangouts Meet, which allows teachers

  • to give live video lessons and record them for students

  • to watch later, there are a bunch of other tools

  • that are now offering their video streaming services

  • for free, so feel free to take a look

  • and have you have the opportunity to connect

  • with your students live,

  • I absolutely support taking that dive.

  • Let your students know you're thinking about them.

  • So, if you can't connect live or even if you have time

  • beyond that, which I know is a stretch right now,

  • send them a note via email or an app like ClassDojo.

  • Find a way to communicate with your students,

  • let them know that you're missing them.

  • I think students right now are really hungry

  • for that opportunity for social connection

  • and getting a note from you as a teacher, someone who's

  • so meaningful in their lives, telling them

  • that you missed them

  • and how excited you'll be to see them again,

  • it really has a deeper meaning.

  • And please, please, please provide feedback.

  • A lot of students have been given a bunch of work to do

  • while they're at home.

  • But if they're just given the work with no feedback,

  • how do they know that that work has meaning?

  • How do they know that they're doing things correctly?

  • So, please, if you've given your students work to do,

  • while they're remote, make sure

  • that you're giving them qualitative feedback as well.

  • Here's a couple of examples we're seeing

  • from our teacher community.

  • So, the top we have a teacher who says she

  • was channeling her inner Sal Khan,

  • and she used video chat to whiteboard live with students

  • and down below we have one of our ambassadors

  • who combines Flipgrid and combines Khan Academy

  • and creates videos for his students

  • in order to know that he's thinking about them

  • and they and he can message each other back.

  • Then, let's talk about communication between students

  • and between you and their families.

  • So, while that communication between you and your students

  • is so essential, students are also missing each other.

  • And so, using something like Google Docs or Slides,

  • allowing students to collaborate

  • or communicate in real time around shared problems

  • and ideas is a great opportunity.

  • We see a lot of teachers, maybe taking a sample problem,

  • so they'll look at Khan Academy and they see a problem

  • that a lot of students have answered incorrectly

  • and they'll throw it on a Google slide and then each student

  • can add a subsequent slide showing their work

  • on how they would solve the problem,

  • and students can leave comments saying,

  • "Oh that's what I missed," or "Great job,"

  • so that way your students are still able to collaborate

  • in a way similar to what they would do in class.

  • Also don't forget about parents and families.

  • Right?

  • Many of you I'm sure are now becoming both a full time,

  • stay at home parent and a full time work

  • from home teacher and so, think about some

  • of those other families who are in your shoes.

  • We're all working remotely on this journey together,

  • and if possible try and reach out to one family per week

  • just to share something their student might be doing well

  • or something, you know, know about their students

  • that's really exciting.

  • And don't hesitate to let parents

  • and guardians know how much you appreciate them

  • for supporting their child

  • through this process of remote learning.

  • This is a really hard jump for parents

  • and to get a little high five

  • from the teacher saying, "You know what,

  • "you're really doing a great job putting that effort in,"

  • that can make a huge, huge difference.

  • And don't forget each other, right?

  • I'm so excited to see so many people on here today

  • because we really are stronger together

  • and don't forget to reach out to your other teachers.

  • Teachers you work with daily

  • that you're used to communicating with,

  • members of maybe your peer learning community,

  • and just your teacher friends, they're going

  • through this transition as well,

  • so don't hesitate to share best practices,

  • or just check in on each other

  • and if you're looking for a way

  • to communicate with them, use some of the same tools

  • you're already using with your students.

  • Number two, choose the best tools, and stay with them.

  • Just the tools that are best for you and your students.

  • There's a lot of noise right now around digital tools,

  • and there's all sorts of things you can use

  • for remote learning.

  • But you know your classroom boss.

  • So, start with things that you've already been using.

  • If you've been using Khan Academy all year.

  • Great.

  • Please keep using us.

  • If you are looking for new tools,

  • take what fits you and your students.

  • I don't know your classroom better than you do,

  • and neither does anyone else.

  • And so, find what fits your students use that.

  • And make sure you're not switching it every day, every week

  • because students, we want them

  • to focus on what they're learning, we want them

  • to learn new skills in math or English language arts

  • or foreign languages.

  • We don't want them worried about stress over new tools.

  • So, if you find what's right stick with it.

  • Number three, keep a schedule.

  • And we know this is much easier said than done.

  • But sticking to consistent times for working and connecting

  • with students is really important.

  • And as we're trying to keep schedules for students,

  • we also wanna try and keep schedules for ourselves.

  • It helps give a rhythm to the day and to our organization.

  • So, find times for you to lesson plan,

  • connect with students, find times for you to take a break.

  • And if you're looking for examples

  • because this is a really big adventure for a lot of us,

  • we've got you covered.

  • Sal Khan has put together key schedules

  • for all different age groups.

  • So, you'll see on your screen right now, an example

  • for our elementary school students, an example

  • for our middle school students and example

  • for our high school students.

  • What should you be thinking about?

  • What might your students need?

  • And you'll see this is not just sit

  • in front of their computer for eight hours,

  • things like getting outside and playing,

  • finding time to read and reflect,

  • all of those things are there for them.

  • And definitely teachers are great at adapting resources.

  • So, if this is a great base for you,

  • take it and make it your own.

  • Number four, support independent learning.

  • And I know a lot of us are always trying

  • to find ways for our students to gain independence

  • and really take ownership and agency of their learning.

  • And so, with remote opportunities we

  • can encourage our students to really take hold of that

  • and to master new skills.

  • So, using Khan Academy's mastery system, students can set,

  • students can use mastery goals to work below, on,

  • or above grade levels, and students

  • can move at their own pace.

  • They're always welcome to go back and review content

  • or move ahead.

  • They can even work on subjects

  • outside what they would normally do inside your classroom.

  • Some teachers might encourage students

  • to move a course below or course ahead

  • in the same content area, or I even know one math teacher

  • who wants students to master their grade level in math,

  • encourage them to find something that they're passionate

  • about and really dive into master skills in that area.

  • So, encourage your students to take a little ownership

  • of their learning now and move ahead, or review concepts

  • that make them feel really competent in their learning.

  • and if you're looking for more guidance

  • on how to tactically do this,

  • the link at the bottom of this slide will take you

  • to a how-to article

  • on setting up course mastery goals for your students.

  • And this here is just a quick animation, so for those of you

  • that are familiar with the Khan Academy platform,

  • if you go to your teacher dashboard

  • and into your class, course mastery on the left hand side,

  • as you see the image doing, click placement and create goal.

  • Again, I highl