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  • So this gold Apple Watch has been sitting at the bottom of a lake for 9 months. And

  • as you can expect, it's not currently working right now. If you remember, about a year ago

  • I went and hung out with Casey Neistat and we dipped an Apple Watch in 24 karat gold,

  • which was pretty fun. There's more to that story though. As I was practicing to see if

  • I could actually do it, I made two watches. One of which I gave to my wife who has an

  • iPhone and does that kind of thing. And she still has her watch and wears it all the time

  • and enjoys it. Actually, if you watch Casey's video really closely at the one minute mark,

  • you can see my wife's knee right there in the corner.

  • The other watch I gave to Dan from the YouTube channel What's Inside. And he lost it while

  • boating pretty soon afterward, and it's been sitting at the bottom of a lake for 9 months.

  • We did try to find it one time but we were unsuccessful. But just yesterday, Dan and

  • the scuba diver Jake, who I'm sure you've seen his videos on YouTube, went down to the

  • lake and actually found it.

  • Now, Apple Watches are water-resistant...but not for 9 months. Today we're going to see

  • if we can fix it. Water damage is a super hard thing to repair, especially on an Apple

  • Watch, so it should be pretty interesting. Let's get started.

  • [Intro]

  • So the craziest thing about this Apple Watch as a result of being stuck under water for

  • 9 months, is that it has a gold haze looking ring thing around the screen. Kind of like

  • what we see after a burn test, where a portion of the screen is just white and doesn't recover.

  • I think it's kind of cool now how the screen matches the 24 karat gold body. So if the

  • screen does still work after this repair, I'm just going to leave it.

  • The gold plating on the body looks pretty good even though it's been underwater for

  • the better part of a year. It helps that the lake it was lost in is fresh water and not

  • salt water. Apple Watches are some of the hardest and most complex pieces of mobile

  • technology to take apart and repair successfully. An Apple Watch teardown makes a cellphone

  • teardown look like a cakewalk, so thumbs up to whoever does this on the regular because

  • I'd personally rather poke my eyes out.

  • The Apple Watch screen sits on a little shelf inside the Apply Watch frame, and as we know,

  • Apple Watches are water-resistant down to about 50 meters for short periods of time.

  • So the screen adhesive is incredibly strong. The goal here is to take my paper thin metal

  • pry tool and stick it between the gold frame and the screen, and then tilt it so the screen

  • will gradually lift up. The reason I'm not using heat this time around is because heat

  • just makes the repair harder since it's hard to hold onto and there's no wiggle room inside

  • of here. And most importantly, sitting between the screen and the metal shelf is a thin ring

  • of electronics called the Force Touch Ring. So I'm putting my tool right below the glass,

  • but above the Force Touch Ring while trying not to damage it. The Force Touch Ring is

  • only a $15.00 replacement part on Amazon, but it's still just extra work to swap out.

  • Once I make a big enough gap I can slip the thin piece of plastic between the glass and

  • the Force Touch layer, and slice all around the edge of the screen to saw through the

  • adhesive. Remember, there are screen display ribbons at the top and bottom of the device

  • that I'm trying to avoid. If I were to break the screen, it would be a $200 replacement

  • part. It doesn't help that the Apple Watch is super small and I'm not used to working

  • with tiny things.

  • Finally, after carefully slicing off the adhesive from every side, the screen can lift up from

  • the Apple Watch exposing the taptic engine as well as the super small battery. I'll put

  • some drops of isopropyl alcohol on the screen ribbon so it'll separate a bit from the screen

  • and allow us more access to the screen ribbon cables.

  • The tiny screen ribbons aren't Lego-style unfortunately. They are latch-style connectors,

  • and like everything else inside this phone, they are extremely tiny like a sprinkle on

  • a cupcake. The drop of alcohol helps the adhesive not be so sticky while we peel away the black

  • protective flap on the connector. Then I can reach my tweezers in and gently pop up the

  • little latch holding down the connector to the screen. This watch might look big on whatever

  • screen you're watching this video on right now, but I promise it's very small in real

  • life. I can grab the ribbons and pull directly out releasing the screen from the Apple Watch

  • body...and it's free. For being under water for 9 months, this thing actually isn't in

  • too bad of shape. It was under about 10 or 15 feet of water. You'll have to check out

  • Jake's video to see how deep it actually was when he found it while scuba diving. But at

  • first glance, this watch is still surprisingly very clean, with only a little bit of rust

  • and corrosion around this screw and a few other places that you'll see in a second.

  • But still, much better than I expected.

  • The tiny 291 milliamp hour battery, that's about as big as my thumbnail, needs to be

  • pried out. No magic pull tabs this time around. And there's one tiny screw holding down a

  • bracket over the battery connector. All of these screws are tri-points.

  • When a phone or electronic device is water damaged, it's usually the battery or the ribbon

  • connectors that stop working first. A phone won't turn on if the battery is dead, and

  • also won't function if the connections are corroded. I'll show more of that in just a

  • second. I can pop off the battery ribbon cable just like a little Lego, but with how clean

  • things look, I'm much more optimistic about bringing this guy back to life.

  • I'll drop some more isopropyl alcohol into the battery connector and brush it off to

  • dislodge any corrosion. Connectors are conductive, so they can send signals or power throughout

  • the device. But corrosion, that green or black gunk that comes with being exposed to liquid,

  • stops the flow of power. So it needs to be cleaned or scraped off gently while not damaging

  • the contacts. A replacement battery for this Series 4 Apple Watch isn't too expensiveabout

  • $20. So I'll take a new one which hasn't been exposed to water, and clip it down into place.

  • Then I can take this screw that's smaller than an ant's leg and put it back inside the

  • metal bracket which covers the battery connector. Then I'll set the battery down. Hopefully

  • a new battery is all it takes to repair the Apple Watch. Taking out the other electronics

  • like the motherboard and heart rate sensors gets super complicated because everything

  • is so miniaturized. If I peel back the plastic over the screen ribbons, I can expose a little

  • T-shaped arm below the gold contacts. I can use these little arms to gently push the connector

  • up into it's slot. But first, notice that the ribbon connectors are a bit dirty. I'm

  • going to clean these off as best I can with the alcohol, as well as the latches on the

  • screen itself. I could obviously just replace the screen at this point. The whole display

  • does cost $200, but I kind of like the story that the gold looking ring around the edge

  • comes with after being underwater for 9 months.

  • Blasting air into the connectors also can sometimes help clear the corrosion after the

  • alcohol breaks it loose. Finally, I can gently line up the screen ribbons with the latches

  • and push them into place with the plastic T shoulder things. If the water does power

  • on and function right now, it'll probably continue to work for a good long while. But

  • with water damage, it's never a for sure thing. Just like rust does on metal, these little

  • bits of corrosion inside the devise could start corroding again at any time. Water damage

  • is like cancerbut for electronics.

  • With the new battery and clean connectors, I'll throw the 24 karat gold Apple Watch back

  • on a charger. And we have success. After charging for a bit, the Apple Watch turns on and still

  • thinks it's Saturday, July 6th...almost 10 months ago when Dan lost it in the lake. Everything

  • appears to be working. But one thing that's not working correctly is the spinning knob

  • her over on the side. It won't register spins or presses which is kind of important. So

  • I'll turn off the watch while checking that the display is indeed working, and dive back

  • into the minuscule interior.

  • Underneath the battery we can find that knob connection and clean it off. Two more screws

  • the size of ant legs hold down the metal bracket which I'll remove. Then I can disconnect the

  • knob ribbon just like a little Lego and clean off all the gold contacts...polishing them

  • up so they can be as conductive as possible again.

  • Electricity is a finicky thing, especially when it's this small. With everything connected,

  • clean, and plugged back in, the spinny knob is back to functioning like normal. If you

  • stayed awake this long during the video, congratulations. We're on the home stretch of sealing everything

  • back together before we take it back to Dan. Unfortunately though, during my screen removal,

  • I did de-laminate the Force Touch Sensor, which kills it. So I do have to replace that

  • $15 part. Dan, I'll accept my reimbursement in the form of Oreo's, Mountain Dew, or pizza.

  • And yes, we do have to remove the screen one more time to install the new Force Touch Ring.

  • It's held down by one more illegally tiny tri-point screw and I can pop off that connector

  • with my pry tool.

  • The Force Touch Ring is made up of 2 layers, and the Apple Watch can tell when the two

  • layers are compressed together. When the screen is pressed harder than usual, it generates

  • the Force Touch Command and it's pretty important to the overall functionality of the watch.

  • I'll clean it up and then take the new Force Touch Ring adhesive and pop it down under

  • the watch body. After the thin strip of pre-cut adhesive is in place, I can install the Force

  • Touch Ring by setting it on top of the adhesive, making sure that there's still plenty of room

  • for the screen to sandwich down on top. I'll clip in the Force Touch's extremely tiny connector

  • and screw it back in with that microscopic screw. We can reconnect the display for the

  • last time. Finally, we can take those clean as we can get them gold ribbons and slide

  • them up into their own latches, and lock them down into place with my soft fingernail instead

  • of a hard metal object that could break the latch. I'll push the black tape up over to

  • protect the connectors and try turning everything on. And lucky for us, or I guess lucky for

  • Dan, everything works. The rotating bit, the clicky bit, the touchy bit, and even the Force

  • Touchy bit. Not too shabby. I'll get some E8000 adhesive to put around the edge underneath

  • the display. It's an industrial strength transparent glue for electronics and jewelry, and should

  • help with the water-resistance again.

  • Even though I would never actually trust it to be water tight. The glue only takes a few

  • minutes to start drying, so I'll clamp it and let it continue to dry for the next 24

  • hours or so. Then I can clean off any excess glue with the isopropyl alcohol. It should

  • be dry with just enough time for us to take it back to Dan.

  • So after Dan found the watch, he drove 4 hours to come drop it off to me. And I fixed it

  • in a day. And now I'm driving 4 hours back to him, and it's going to be a surprise cuz

  • a) I don't think he thinks I can fix the watch. And b) he doesn't expect me to drive 4 hours

  • to drop it off. I would just ship it like a normal person.

  • -[Cambry] But we're not normal.

  • -[Zack] So uh, this should be interesting. '

  • [Whispering] There he is right there.

  • -[Dan] What?! What are you guys doing here?!

  • -[Cambry] Hi!

  • -[Dan] You can't come all the way here to surprise us! We surprised you! What the heck?!

  • -[Zack] It's working!

  • -[Dan] Is that why I'm here? That's what the surprise is? Oh man! Wait no...how is it working?

  • You already fixed it?

  • -[Zack] I already fixed it. So it was actually a little bit more difficult than I anticipated.

  • -[Dan] So it took you like 24 hours?

  • -[Zack] A couple hours...a couple hours...So inside we replaced the battery, and then there

  • was a bunch of corrosion on like the little spinny bit, and then also on the battery contacts.

  • So, but other than that..

  • -[Dan] It totally works!

  • -[Zack] It is water damaged so it's like...

  • -[Dan] The screen's a little dim, but it works! It was at the bottom of the lake.

  • -[Zack] Let's say it's working now and it might now work forever.

  • -[Dan] What in the world! You guys came all the way down here? This is amazing!

  • -[Zack] It was a fun project!

  • Now we just need Casey Neistat back in here and we can have all three..

  • -[Dan] The whole crew is back!

  • Outside it looked really dim, but in here, let's see...that looks great. It just adds

  • character to it.

  • -[Zack] So the question is are you going to go swimming with it again?

  • -[Dan] Never with this one. I've learned my lesson and I kind of want to get a new band,

  • but I need something that has a latch on it. Is that what you have on yours?

  • These Apple Watches are so bad. Even when I go down my slide in the backyard this one

  • sometimes comes off. Yeah...never again.

  • Alright guys, we're just going to FaceTime Jake...Scuba Jake, and just see if he answers,

  • and we'll tell him that it's here. So...alright here we go. FaceTime.

  • Dude, he's probably swimming in a river somewhere right now.

  • -[Jake] Hello!

  • -[Dan] Hey, it works!

  • -[Jake] What's up man, how are you?

  • -[Dan] Good. You just jump into a waterfall?

  • -[Jake] Yeah. Well, alright. We landed in Atlanta after we went to your house. And then

  • we went to Tennessee to go search underneath some waterfalls. Look what I'm wearing. I'm

  • wearing a Utah jacket.

  • -[Dan] Hey you're representing! It never stops, you're always saving people's stuff.

  • -[Jake] That's right.

  • -[Dan] Well I got this crazy thing I've got to show you, and I had to FaceTime you and

  • show you this. I had this guy come over today. He drove all the way over to my house.

  • -[Jake] Hey!

  • -[Dan] And check this out. He got it working!

  • -[Jake] No way! That's the one?!

  • -[Dan] This is it. It's gold. Look, it's the gold one.

  • -[Jake] Oh wow. Dude, I can't believe you.

  • -[Dan] Look at the screen. It still has that weird stuff on it. He didn't replace the screen.

  • -[Jake] No I think that's really cool. It adds to it. So we drove to your house and

  • you drove all the way to his house? What kind of lie did you come up with?

  • -[Zack] We didn't talk to him, we just told his wife that we were going to stop by and

  • she kept the secret for us.

  • -[Jake] That's awesome man! I'm so stoked that still works. That's amazing. That's such

  • a cool thing that you guys made. And like to go out there to experience that and to

  • be with you guys is such an awesome experience. And to have it actually still work after like

  • 10 months underwater....that's pretty insane. That's so cool man. I'm proud of y'all.

  • -[Dan] There we go! She lives again. Thanks to you too.

  • -[Jake] Yeah I can't believe honestly that we found that. We were going to drain the

  • whole lake if we had to.

  • -[Dan] Awesome. Well thanks again my friend.

  • -[Jake] You're welcome bud. Don't drop it anymore.

  • -[Zack] Right?

  • -[Dan] Right!

  • -[Zack] And that is it. The conclusion of the epic adventure. The watch was made, given,

  • lost, found, and fixed.

  • -[Dan] All because of me being irresponsible. All of this work went into it.

  • -[Zack] But think of the friends we met along the way.

  • -[Dan] It's true. It was worth it. Just as you heard from Jake.

  • -[Zack] Right!

  • -[Dan] He's grateful that he came out to Lake Powell and saw that. If you're jumping in

  • water, PSA, don't wear Apple Watches with this band because the water will just wreck

  • it and then it's just gone.

  • -[Zack] Alright. I will leave Dan's video here as well as Jake's...Scuba Jake's over

  • here. And check those out if you want to see the complete story. And thanks for watching.

  • I'll see you around.

So this gold Apple Watch has been sitting at the bottom of a lake for 9 months. And