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  • Hey there, it's me and you're watching MarieTV.

  • Now we're about to get into an interview with Robin Sharma all about how to maximize

  • your day for productivity, rest, and joy.

  • Now we recorded this interview long before COVID-19 hits so you're gonna hear us talk

  • about things like traveling and art galleries and other activities that are just not possible

  • at this moment.

  • Now that said, I think that this interview contains a lot of timeless lessons that can

  • really help us all.

  • I also want to say, you know, this worldwide pandemic, it's difficult and everyone is

  • dealing with it in their own ways.

  • If you're having a really tough time right now, especially as it relates to this interview,

  • take what works for you and leave the rest.

  • That said, enjoy it, have fun.

  • I'm sending so much love Let's dive in.

  • Hey, it's Marie Forleo, and you are watching MarieTV, the place to be to create a business

  • and life you love.

  • Now if you're someone who wants to make the most out of your days, out of your weeks,

  • out of your years, my guest today has some pretty good ideas to help.

  • Robin Sharma is a globally respected humanitarian, bestselling author, and the founder of The

  • Robin Sharma Foundation for Children.

  • Considered one of the world's top leadership experts, his clients include Fortune 100 companies,

  • billionaires, athletes, music icons and members of royalty.

  • Robin's books have sold over 15 million copies in over 92 languages.

  • His newest book, The 5 AM Club, is available now.

  • Robin, thank you so much for taking the journey to be here.

  • Thank you, Marie.

  • So I want to talk about The 5 AM Club, and we're going to dive deep into that.

  • But first, for those that don't know your story and your journey, I feel like there's

  • so many people in our audience that may find themselves in the position that you once were

  • in a career that you're like, "This isn't necessarily me."

  • Can you take us back to those days, and tell us a little bit about how you started out,

  • and what that transition was like from being in a place that didn't feel aligned with who

  • you ultimately were, to the career that you have today?

  • Sure.

  • I think, Marie, life's greatest heartbreak is being untrue to yourself.

  • I come from very humble beginnings.

  • I have a great family, and yet the people around me said, "If you become a lawyer,"

  • like I basically had a choice.

  • Become an engineer, a doctor or a lawyer.

  • And so I followed through on that, and I went to law school.

  • I became a really successful litigation lawyer.

  • I had a nice place to live, and had a nice car, and I was making great money.

  • People said, "I'm on... you're on your way to being a judge," and yet I would wake up

  • every morning, and I would look at myself in the bathroom mirror and I didn't like or

  • even know the person who was looking back at me.

  • I love that word, angst.

  • That angst just got to a point where I said I had to make some changes.

  • I started listening to that silent whisper of my heart.

  • There's something I believe in, which is instinct is much more powerful and wiser than intellect.

  • I think when all of us trust our instinct in a world that says intellect and logic is

  • everything, we start to enter what Mr. Riley in The 5 AM Club callsthe magic.”

  • That's what happened to me.

  • So did you know what you wanted to do instead of your law career, or did you have... was

  • there a period of transition?

  • I know for me, when I was on Wall Street and I worked in magazines, I kept hearing that

  • little voice of, "This is not where you're supposed to be.

  • This is not who you're meant to be in the world, and not the work that you're meant

  • to do."

  • But I was really frustrated because I didn't...

  • I was like, "Well, can you please tell me what else I'm supposed to do?"

  • It took me years to find my path.

  • So I was curious about if you had clarity in that moment, or if you had to take a journey

  • around to find some discovery in what else you could do?

  • Yeah, and I totally hear what you're saying.

  • I find your destiny doesn't knock, it whispers.

  • It wasn't this epiphany.

  • I think when you start to trust your instinct, and trust yourself versus the world, and you

  • block out the opinions of other people, the pace of synchronicity starts to open up, and

  • these doors that you're supposed to walk through start to present themselves to you.

  • So what happened to me was I just started...

  • I mean the angst, and the pain and the confusion.

  • By the way, I think confusion has a bad rap in society.

  • Anyone on a path to growth and self-excavation and personal mastery is going to be confused

  • all the time.

  • Because the very nature of leaving your safe harbor of the known, going out to blue ocean

  • where possibility lives constantly means you're going to be out in the unknown, which is where

  • fear lives, but on the other side of your fear is your freedom.

  • So I started paying attention to that angst, and that confusion.

  • I went to books.

  • I went to books, and I started interviewing people who were financially successful, as

  • well as emotionally successful and spiritually successful.

  • I started putting together this new philosophy for living.

  • Then, as we know, ideation without execution is delusion, and so I started living what

  • I learned step by step.

  • I started changing the way that I lived, and given my "transformation," I said, "I want

  • to share my message with other people."

  • I self-published a little book called Megaliving.

  • That was actually my first book.

  • It had a super cheesy title, 30 Days to a Perfect Life.

  • I had this little passport picture on the front, and it was poorly designed.

  • The type was so small you couldn't read it.

  • I had 3000 copies that were published, and they sat in my little dining room.

  • That book started selling, and then I self-published a book called The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari

  • in a Kinko's copy shop.

  • My mom was my editor.

  • My father helped me sell it at service clubs.

  • Just one book at a time.

  • That led into a whole new reality for me, a whole new career for me.

  • What's so cool about that is when I started my journey, I remember I first published an

  • ebook, which was new at the time, right?

  • This is the late '90s.

  • I just remember that journey in my... it turned from an ebook into a self-published book.

  • My parents helped me get it out into the world, and shrink wrapped it.

  • I Just look back at those days, and it was so cool, the beginnings and then to see where

  • it could go.

  • So thank you for sharing that, because I know so many people listening right now might have...

  • whether they want to transition into a career where they share their thoughts and ideas,

  • or they want to just transition into being an artist, or maybe an engineer or maybe a

  • lawyer.

  • Just to understand that it takes time, and that it's okay to start humbly and you can

  • go to great places.

  • You just have to listen to that instinct.

  • I want to transition into The 5 AM Club, because you've shared that this book took you four

  • years to write.

  • So how was this process different than your other books?

  • I wanted The 5 AM Club to be the most beautiful, content-rich, handcrafted book I've ever done.

  • Now, whether that happened or not is up to the readers.

  • One of my favorite books is The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran.

  • I don't know if you've read it, but it's just...

  • Yes, I have.

  • It's just a masterpiece of philosophy.

  • One of the things that I read about Kahlil Gibran is he carried the manuscript around

  • with him for five years because he wanted every single line to be the best line he could

  • possibly handcraft.

  • That was my intention with The 5 AM Club.

  • So I wrote it in , which is one of my favorite places in the world.

  • I wrote it in Mauritius.

  • I wrote it in Russia.

  • I wrote it in Sao Paulo.

  • I wrote it in Switzerland.

  • It was just this beautiful, dangerous, messy, confusing, inspirational process where I just

  • wrote to try to make it the best piece of work I could do.

  • I faced self-doubt.

  • I faced people who looked at the content and said, "Okay, everyone's talking about mindset.

  • You're talking about these four interior empires that the book is based upon.

  • Mindset, Heartset, Healthset, and Soulset.

  • What's that all about?"

  • I tried to have images, little pieces of art in there.

  • I have these frameworks on exponential productivity and elite performance.

  • Then towards the end of the book, there are those 11 letters from Mr. Riley, the eccentric

  • tycoon talking about entering the magic, and the mysticism of prosperity, and philosophy

  • on living a life that soars, and sings, and has an impact and is beautiful.

  • I just tried to write from the deepest, most honest, honorable place I could because I

  • think the world is in a very messy place right now.

  • I think a lot of people are bored, and struggling and exhausted.

  • This isn't a platitude, I think every single human being has this bigness, and this bravery,

  • and this creativity, and this magic inside of them.

  • I've experienced it in my life.

  • Not everyday, but I've experienced it.

  • I wanted to share it with people, how they can enter it in their own lives.

  • So was the process hard for you because you feel like it was a different style of writing,

  • or was it hard just because of travel and balancing the business?

  • I'm trying to understand a little bit more about what made this one more difficult or

  • different than the others for you, because you've written a lot.

  • You've written a ton of books.

  • Yeah.

  • It's a very great question.

  • It was different for me.

  • It was different for me because a lot of my other books, it was teaching, and what I tried

  • to do in this book is balance.

  • How do you master the world by first honoring and building intimacy with your primal hero?

  • It was a hard book because I wanted to go deeper.

  • It was a hard book because there are a lot of new concepts that I believe are disruptive

  • to the field of call it personal development and elite performance.

  • There was a lot of self-doubt as well when I wrote this book, because I think when you

  • try to present anything new to the world, it's... you're going to doubt yourself.

  • Also, to be completely candid, as I always want to be, I hadn't written a book for roughly

  • 10 years.

  • Interesting.

  • I didn't know that.

  • Yeah.

  • So I really had focused more on other things, and there were people who were saying, "Well,

  • his best days are over.

  • Oh, he's the monk who sold his Ferrari, or the greatness guide, or the leader who had

  • no title but he's not an author anymore, and perhaps he's not relevant anymore."

  • So I felt that challenge, and I wanted to do something that was hopefully special.

  • Yeah.

  • I think you really accomplished it.

  • Thank you.

  • Before we... the cameras turn on...

  • I really, really enjoyed it.

  • But I think what you just mentioned there is important because so many of us, no matter

  • what stage of life we're at, I remember when I was in my early 20s having this constant

  • voice in my head like, "You're too old.

  • You're too old already.

  • You haven't done X, Y, or Z by 22 or 23," which now sounds absolutely just...

  • I could slap myself, right, going back.

  • But I think that is one of the most prevalent undercurrents of anxiety and fear in our culture

  • is a fear of irrelevance, and somehow that our best days are behind us.

  • So thank you for sharing that, because it's something that I think all of us, if we haven't

  • faced it yet, it's definitely coming.

  • Yeah.

  • I think that's an important point, which is I think we live in a world where the seduction

  • is to push 1,000 pieces of mediocrity, versus deliver one piece of mastery.

  • What I mean by that is if you spend 20 years on one book, but it is the greatest book that

  • you could possibly do, then that's a win.

  • By the way, even if the world doesn't applaud what you bring to the world, if you've delivered

  • your piece of magic to the world, your Sistine Chapel ceiling to the world, you've won.

  • Yes.

  • We live in this world that is much more about egoism versus heroism.

  • I think heroism is... it's really...

  • The race is really a race against yourself.

  • I'm not that into applause and worldly accolades.

  • I think if you feel you've done your best, and you've been true to your creativity, and

  • you've lived by your values, and you've released what you believe to be magic to the world,

  • and you've done your best to raise others while you've honored yourself, you're a hero.

  • You've won.

  • It doesn't matter if you're an army of one.

  • I mean van Gogh didn't...

  • I believe van Gogh didn't sell one piece of art while he was alive.

  • Yeah.

  • Let's talk about The 5 AM Club specifically.

  • I love the subtitle, which isOwn Your Morning, Elevate Your Life.”

  • So is this a practice for you that you had not only experienced for yourself and the

  • transformative nature of it, but clearly you've taught it to other people?

  • Were you like, "Goodness, if people could just get this one thing"?

  • Obviously, there's so much more in the book than just The 5 AM Club idea, which I want

  • to dive into, but there's something.

  • I mean that's the title of your book.

  • So was this practice itself so transformative you're like, "This is what the next book has

  • to be about"?

  • Absolutely.

  • I have two children, Colby and Bianca.

  • If there was one habit, or if there was one piece of advice –– not that they listen

  • to my advice –– but if there was one piece of advice I'd ask them to listen to, it's

  • rise before the sun.

  • There is a reason many of the great women and men of the world, the great history makers,

  • the great poets, the great philosophers, the great movement makers rose before the sun.