Placeholder Image

字幕列表 影片播放

  • Today we're off to Iceland, one of my favorite countries

  • which has been at the very leading edge of

  • the Coronavirus testing.

  • There is a company there called deCODE genetics,

  • which has been looking at

  • the Icelandic population's genomes for about 25 years.

  • When the virus hit, they very quickly started testing

  • just about everyone they could,

  • not just people who were sick,

  • but a random sampling of Icelanders.

  • They've come up with some of the biggest insights we have

  • on the virus.

  • Let's hit Iceland and talk to the CEO of deCODE genetics.

  • Do you mind just introducing yourself?

  • My name isri Stefánsson,

  • and I'm the founder and CEO of deCODE genetics.

  • You had one of the most ambitious testing programs.

  • You've tested I think it's about 10% of the population?

  • 10.5% of the population.

  • 10.5.

  • So it sounded like at first, anybody who wanted a test

  • could sign up and apply for one, and then you went

  • to this more random process where you,

  • I think you literally went through

  • the phone book and kind of picked people.

  • We started to test on January 31st,

  • and the healthcare system tested

  • for 28 days before finding the first patient.

  • We started to screen in a population in general

  • on March the 13th.

  • And we have already screened about 10% of the population.

  • We have determined that on average, during this time

  • that we've screening, about .8% of the population

  • has been infected by the virus,

  • but that number has been coming down.

  • We have sequenced the virus

  • from every single person infected.

  • And that first generated a very interesting picture.

  • So if you look worldwide,

  • there is a tremendous collections

  • of mutations in this virus.

  • So in this patterns of mutations,

  • you have about a barcode,

  • and having the sequence of the virus

  • from everyone infected gives us an opportunity

  • to determine the country of origin of

  • the infection in all of the infected in Iceland.

  • Another thing that you can do with this sequence is

  • that you can use it to trace the infection in Iceland.

  • You can figure out who was infected from whom.

  • So if you were diagnosed with an infection,

  • we can in an instant, find all of the smartphones

  • that within one or two meters from your smartphone over

  • the past five days, which is somewhat scary.

  • Yeah.

  • It sounds like considerable invasion of privacy.

  • But when you are looking a beast like this in the eyes,

  • you have to use whatever you have.

  • You know because Iceland is relatively contained,

  • because you were so aggressive with your testing

  • and tracing, I mean you didn't go on to the same lockdown

  • as some of the other countries.

  • Explain to me what lockdown looked like a month ago

  • and what it looks like now as a result of all the testing

  • that you've been able to do and all the tracing.

  • We really don't have a lockdown.

  • We don't have a curfew.

  • We have the ban on gathering more than 20 people.

  • We are insisting that we should keep social distance

  • of two meters.

  • We have our elementary school are open,

  • the childcare centers are open, the stores are open.

  • We are taking a very mild approach to this in general

  • but we have been very aggressive when it comes to

  • the specific approach to those infected

  • and been very aggressive in looking for them

  • by screening widely.

  • I think that the societal price for doing

  • this approach is much less,

  • there's a higher price than screening but that's trivial.

  • That's absolutely trivial.

  • I mean so this remains kinda shocking to me,

  • I mean like, how is it possible that we still do not

  • have widespread anti-body testing in places outside

  • of somewhere like Iceland?

  • I honestly, what surprises me the most

  • is that we don't have it in the United States,

  • because what we're doing here in Iceland is

  • what we've learnt in America, all right?

  • You have this unbelievably resourceful nation.

  • You have, you know, you have the 25, 50 best universities

  • in the world.

  • There does seem to be will here,

  • particularly among the universities.

  • Is some of this just down to the fact

  • that it's almost like a supply thing?

  • The reagents, the.

  • So much stuff has been tied up in China

  • and the supply chain, or do you really think this is

  • more of like a will-- ?

  • I am buying my reagents from the United States.

  • Okay.

  • It is not a reagent thing.

  • It is a complete lack of coordination.

  • There seems to be a complete inability to take advantage

  • of the fact that in an epidemic like this,

  • everyone wants to contribute.

  • You are so young, you may not remember,

  • but when Dukakis was running against Ronald Regan,

  • when Ronald Regan was running for re-election,

  • Dukakis said in one interview that

  • the fish rots from the head down.

  • I think that a lot of your problems begin

  • with your commander-in-chief.

  • Your company's so well known for,

  • obviously having these broad genetic models for working

  • on disease, I mean what else has stood out to you

  • about this particular virus?

  • You see, I've been involved with research into

  • a large number of diseases over the 42/3 years,

  • and usually when we begin to study a disease,

  • the first thing you have to figure out is

  • what questions have yet to be answered.

  • But when it comes to this disease, it falls into my lap

  • and all of the questions are unanswered.

  • If you look at people in general,

  • women are less likely to get infected than men,

  • and if women get infected they do not become as sick as men.

  • About two weeks ago, there were 10 people on respirators

  • at the National Hospital of Iceland.

  • Nine of them were men, just one woman.

  • Children are less likely to get infected than adults,

  • and if they get infected, they are less likely

  • to become sick.

  • There is an enormous diversity in the vulnerability

  • and it's really interesting to speculate on what

  • is it that what causes this clinical diversity.

  • There is something in the nature of the potential host

  • that is very important,

  • and I mean there are others all over

  • the world who are trying to figure out what it is.

Today we're off to Iceland, one of my favorite countries

字幕與單字

影片操作 你可以在這邊進行「影片」的調整,以及「字幕」的顯示

B1 中級

冰島阻止Covid-19的計劃實際上是有效的。 (Iceland's Plan To Stop Covid-19 Actually Works)

  • 22 0
    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
影片單字