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  • -Our next guest represents

  • California's 45th Congressional District.

  • Please welcome back to the show Congresswoman Katie Porter.

  • How are you, Katie?

  • -I'm doing fine. Hanging in there.

  • -You have three children.

  • You are a single mother

  • who is balancing your duties with being a parent.

  • You were just saying your 14-year-old

  • is crushing social distancing.

  • -No, it's like a middle schooler's dream.

  • You don't have to actually go to the middle school.

  • So he's texting. He's playing his guitar.

  • I haven't seen him in a week.

  • But I assume he's still there and healthy.

  • -You have a reputation, well-earned reputation,

  • as being one of the toughest questioners on Capitol Hill.

  • It seems like you have a good B.S. detector.

  • Do your children appreciate that from you?

  • Or do she resent the fact that their mom is so good

  • at knowing when people are maybe not telling the whole truth?

  • -Well, it might be genetic,

  • so I feel like they're getting it.

  • So, I think one of the problems is when you're constantly

  • calling B.S. on your kids,

  • they learn how to do it back on you.

  • So I can't tell you the number of times that my kids

  • have kind of been, like, holding me accountable,

  • and I'm like, "Well, this only works in one direction."

  • But not true in the family environment.

  • So I am overdue on my allowance payments.

  • And I have just failed them in an interminable number of ways

  • that they are letting me know on a very regular basis.

  • They're my very toughest constituents to keep happy.

  • -You have been critical about the fact that Congress

  • is not working particularly well remotely up to this point.

  • There was talk that Congress was going to go back.

  • Now we hear that that's not the case.

  • Can you speak to how you feel

  • Congress should be operating at a time like this?

  • -We're asking the American people to adapt,

  • to do things differently than they've done before,

  • to be creative, to learn how to use new technology,

  • to be flexible,

  • to put public health ahead of everything else.

  • And Congress should be leading by example here

  • rather than acting like an exception.

  • So there may be reasons that we need to go back.

  • I was just back in Washington, DC, last week

  • to vote for more money to help small businesses.

  • But we ought to be adapting

  • to using technology whenever we can

  • to allow us to be as effective as possible

  • while still protecting all of the transit workers and others,

  • our staff, everyone that we engage with

  • when we do travel back to Washington.

  • So it is absolutely time to be training people.

  • If you still have a flip phone and you're a member of Congress,

  • it's time to trade that model up.

  • -And -- [ Laughs ]

  • Some, of course, are --

  • -You laugh as if that's like a small caucus.

  • I mean, the flip-phone caucus has double-digit membership.

  • And it's a bipartisan caucus, I want to add.

  • -I would imagine. Right. There is a lot of times

  • it feels like we're being partisan in our criticism.

  • I would imagine that it's very bipartisan,

  • the flip-phone caucus.

  • [ Laughs ]

  • Do you -- Some people, of course, are standing up

  • for the tradition of Congress

  • and saying the founders would be very anti-Zoom.

  • Do you believe our founding fathers

  • would like Zoom or dislike it?

  • -So, I think that, given the situation

  • that we're in with regard to health,

  • plus the fact that the technology exists,

  • I think that having a Zoom meeting would satisfy

  • the founding fathers' idea of assembling Congress.

  • And I think what would really --

  • I think when you're faced with the alternative,

  • I think what would really alarm the founding fathers

  • is allowing Congress to become a sort of four-member body

  • in which you have Kevin McCarthy and Nancy Pelosi

  • on the House side

  • and Leader McConnell and Leader Schumer

  • on the Senate side --

  • and you have only four people, in essence,

  • being the Congress and meeting and making decisions,

  • because that is what's silencing the diversity of the voices

  • that we have in the House.

  • So Zoom is a way to allow more representatives to have a voice

  • and therefore more Americans to have a voice.

  • It's actually the most Democratic thing we can do

  • in light of the need to protect public health.

  • -And how good do you think your colleagues would be

  • at muting or unmuting themselves on Zoom?

  • -I mean, I wouldn't want to take the past

  • to be the best that we could do.

  • There is a lot of mute and unmute discussion.

  • I would estimate right around 5% to 10%

  • of everything that we do is related to unmuting

  • and what button should be pressed.

  • But, look, people can change.

  • I spent my career teaching people.

  • People can learn Zoom.

  • People can learn how to use technology.

  • And there are legit concerns that we have to think about

  • as we make this transition.

  • One of them that's most important to me

  • is how we're going to let the American public

  • participate or view what we're doing.

  • We're having briefings on my Oversight Committee,

  • on my Financial Services Committee,

  • Progressive Caucus, all of these different things.

  • We're doing the work, but we're not allowing

  • the American people to see what we're doing

  • and to learn what we're learning.

  • And that's the most important thing

  • that we should be thinking about,

  • is how do we give the American people transparency

  • into the decisions that Congress is making right now?

-Our next guest represents

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眾議員凱蒂-波特呼籲仍在使用翻蓋手機的國會議員。 (Rep. Katie Porter Calls Out Congresspeople Who Still Use Flip Phones)

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    林宜悉 發佈於 2021 年 01 月 14 日
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